Dolores O’Riordan

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Posted in Articles |


Our site begins provide tons of Cran-Dol-video stuff again! Check out our video-section. It’ working again! We just begin to restore all stuff, so there will be much more video! Check the site for updates. More Cran-video everyday!

Right now you can download Dolores’ 2007 concert Avo Sessions + 12 live-videos

Really exclusive videos (including great-quality Moscow 2007 concert) will be available soon. Have fun! The Cranberries forever!

Posted in Site Update |


You can download the great Dolores’ concert in San-Sebastian 2007 in DVD-quality right now!  This concert is uploaded online for the first time! And It’s in great quality!

Links of DVD-version of concert in Video-section. Size - 2750Mb, length - 1hour 13min.
It’s one of the best Dolores-Cran concerts we have ever seen! Enjoy! There are several screenshots:

Posted in Dolores News |


Download high-quality record of The Cranberries’ performance in Dublin (9 January, 2009)!:
Download video (115mb) - Linger, Ordinary Day, Zombie

Posted in Dolores News |


Happy New Year, dear fans, Dolores O’Riordan, Noel & Mike Hogan, Fergal Lawler ! We wish you Health… So you may enjoy each day in comfort. We wish you the Love of friends and family… And Peace within your heart. Happy New Year!

BTW Dolores O’Riordan made a GREAT present for us:

- The release date of new Dolores’ album “No Baggage?” is announced today! It’s may 2009!

- The Cranberries will perform together at Dublin concert!
-  Visit new Dolores’ official site www.doloresoriordan.com. You can watch Dolores’ video-congratulation & new photos, to listen to cuts from new songs here. Don’t forget to register for exclusive content

Thank you Dolores for this great present! You’re the best!

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores’ official site was under construction for the long time. At least we know the date of site launch - 00:00 of the 1 of January 2009! Visit www.doloresoriordan.com and listen to the soundtrack. You can listen to the cut of NEW DOLORES’ SONG at the end of soundtrack, just wait for 2 minutes! It would be so lovely, cool, amazing song!!!

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores O’Riordan shared by the 32-sec version of new song with fans!

Download it here:
http://rapidshare.com/files/164309765/myspace.mpg.html

I’m asking now, please
Will you catch me, will I hide
I am begging on my knees
will you be there when I die?

Borderline, borderline.. (???)
Borderline, borderline, borderline…

Posted in Dolores News |


The Letter from Dolores:

Hi guys,

Hope you’re all doing well out there!! Things are brilliant here. I’ve got some updates for ya on the new record, the website, etc. It’s been pretty nuts on my end!! So much going on!

As for the album, we’re all finished recording and mixing now, and headed into the mastering phase. I’m really happy with the way the album’s turned out. Like always, I’ve written all of these songs from my heart. We also shot some video inside the recording studio while we were making the record, so you guys can share in some of those experiences with me. I’ll be uploading that footage to my new site when it launches (along with a bunch of other stuff.) I’ll be making an announcement soon with the official release date for the album, and the official date the website will launch!

So, about my new website!! I just took a look at the new progress today, and it’s really fantastic what the team has been up to behind the scenes.

I think my favorite thing about my new site is that it’s going to be a really interactive experience for you guys. Some of the features include my own social networking community that’s built right in, where you can create a profile, upload your own photos and concert videos, post blogs, create groups, chat live with other fans in my new chat rooms or post in the forums, etc. I just created my own account this evening, and uploaded my first new photo! Haha.

The team and I will be posting updates and uploading new videos, pictures, and tour news on the main page of the site, but members of my community will have access to a lot of exclusive stuff that non-members won’t have access to… and it’s totally free to be a member. :)

So after the new site is launched, I really hope you’ll all join up, create your own profiles, and then leave me some comments or send me a message to let me know what you think!

Anyway, that’s all for now. 2009 is just around the corner now! Really looking forward to seeing you guys on tour and sharing this new music with ya. Thanks for hanging in there with me. ;)

Loves,

Dolores xx

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores wrote a song for the kids canadian tv show “Roll Play”. The new song is “Centipede Sisters”.

Download new song “Centipede Sisters” here: Write your comments about the song in Forums, plz.

CENTIPEDE SISTERS

The centipede sisters,
The centipede sisters,
Let’s watch them interact,
As opposites attracts !

Liz stands up, Zil sits down
Liz might smile, Zil might frown
Liz says black, Zil says white
Liz says day, Zil says night

The centipede sisters,
The centipede sisters,
Let’s watch them interact,
As opposites attracts

The centipede sisters,
The centipede sisters,
The story just begins
With the centipede twins !

Liz jumps high, Zil jumps low
Liz walks fast, Zil walks slow

Round and round and round and round
They’re spinning round and round and round
They’re spinning round and round and round
Fall down !

The centipede sisters,
The centipede sisters,
Let’s watch them interact,
As opposites attracts

The centipede sisters,
The centipede sisters,
The story just begins
With the centipede twins

Opposite attracs,opposite attracs,
Watch us interact.

Opposite attracs,opposite attracs,
Watch us interact
The centipede sisters,
The centipede sisters,
Let’s watch them interact,
As opposites attracts

The centipede sisters,
The centipede sisters,
The story just begins
With the centipede twins

The centipede twins (x4)

Posted in Dolores News |


Happy birthday, dear Dolores O’Riordan! “We love you just the way you are”! Thank you for everything you have made for fans! Your voice is the most beautiful, magic, powerful & weakness thing in the world! Russian fans wish you the best, and hope that you are specially happy in this spacial day. 

Everything is changing, but your voice, your talent are forever! And our love is endless too. Be happy, dear Dolores! We love you!

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores O’Riordan has send the letter to fans on her site:

Hello!

Thanks to everyone for all your support, messages, and kind words. Sorry it’s been so long but I’m happy to share there’s lots going on!!

21 new songs, in the studio working away, a brand new website in the works with all the things you’ve been asking for from forums, your own fan profile pages, videos, tons of exclusive stuff, interactive areas, chat room, contests, live webcasts, 24/7 radio, regular updates from the road, a mobile site, even the occasional live video chats and a lot more!

There will be more announced soon, so keep checking back here until we announce the launch of the new site!

Love,

DoloresXX

Posted in Dolores News |


Source: Daily Mail
Author: CATHERINE O’BRIEN

Dolores O’Riordan enjoyed huge success with the Cranberries, but it came at a high price. Now, after years out of the limelight, she is back - but this time with no entourage and no fuss…

For anyone looking to restore their faith in the power of serendipity, the story of Dolores O’Riordan is a good place to start.

When she was 18, a girl at school told her about three boys in a band looking for a singer.

She met them and, within a week, they had written their first song together, called ‘Linger’.

Barely a year later, it reached the U.S. top ten.

Dolores O’Riordan is back after years out of the limelight. The singer enjoyed huge success with the Cranberries, their first single, ‘Linger’ reached the U.S. top ten

The Cranberries went on to have number-one singles in 26 countries and sell more than 40 million albums worldwide.

Dolores, a wisp of a woman with a hypnotic, powerhouse voice, was catapulted from the backwaters of Limerick to the global stage, becoming one of Ireland’s richest women.

But then, almost as suddenly as she had appeared, she vanished.

Seven years of relentless touring and recording had led to a catastrophic breakdown.

She had therapy, recovered, had three children and focused on “just being anonymous”.

In late 2005, just as Dolores was thinking of getting back to work, she took a call from the American actor Adam Sandler, who was directing and starring in a film called Click.

“‘Linger’ was one of his favourite songs, and he had this wedding scene in which he wanted me to perform in a cameo,” she explains.

Her daughter Dakota was six months old at the time “and I was still nursing her, but I thought, ‘I can’t refuse’.”

Dolores leaving court with husband Don Burton after their former nanny Joy Fahy lost her case against them, April 2004

So she weaned Dakota, flew to Los Angeles and, from the moment she stepped on to the film set, “I enjoyed myself so much. It was like being called back”.

Having fled the spotlight for so long it was a big step for Dolores to re-enter the fray with her debut solo album and accompanying world tour last year.

The difference this time, she says, is that she is doing it on her own terms.

“In a band, you are always rushing, working to schedules, feeling you are part of a package.

“Now I don’t have to worry about anyone else - I can just be myself.”

We meet in a plush Park Lane hotel in London. A decade ago, as part of the Cranberries, Dolores would probably have arrived with an entourage and conducted interviews in a lavish suite. Today, she is alone and happy to sit in a quiet corner of the lounge.

Up close you can see the subtle signs of her star status - lusciously layered hair, gleaming dentistry and a French manicure.

But at 36, she still has about her that fragile yet feisty air of the goth teenager who used to paint her nails black and pale her face with baby powder.

Her only jewellery is her wedding band.

“I don’t like bling,”she says.

“Don (her husband) bought me lots of jewellery, but it was just something else to stress about.

“When you have four bracelets, you constantly ask yourself, ‘Which one shall I wear?’ The easiest thing is not to wear any.”

Her jeans and pumps are similarly understated.

“I was a fashion victim for a while, and I do love tailored clothes.

“But I don’t feel I have to prove myself by wearing expensive stuff. What is important is what’s in your heart.”

To understand the ambitious, uber-cool yet at times crushingly insecure Dolores, you have to appreciate her earliest years, growing up in rural Ballybricken. Hers was a classic Irish Catholic childhood - convent education, Mass every Sunday and saint’s day.

There was hardship - her father had suffered brain damage in a car crash two years before Dolores was born and never worked, so her mother toiled to pay the bills, childminding and doing housework by day, followed by shifts at a local factory at night.

As the youngest of seven - she has five brothers and one sister - Dolores had an attention-seeking, rebellious streak, but mostly she did what she was told.

She played the church organ, sang Gregorian chants and wasn’t allowed to go to discos or wear make-up.

“My mother had this notion of me becoming a nun,” she recalls.

“But I was thinking rock star, and when I was 18, something inside me flipped. One day I ran away, and it broke my mother’s heart.”

Within weeks of leaving, she had hitched up with the Cranberries and was touring Ireland in an old bread van, before signing a jaw-dropping six-album deal, and travelling to America.

She shudders to think of how hard the wrench must have been for her mother.

“We made our peace a couple of weeks after I left, but I never moved back.

“You take your parents so much for granted, then later you’re sorry for having been such a pain.

“I thought I knew it all.

“It was only when I got to my 30s that I realised I knew a lot less than I thought I did in my 20s.”

They were heady days, and Dolores loved the songwriting and performing, but she admits to having been naive about what it is to be a celebrity.

“Fame is weird,” she says. “You’re just trying to be normal, but then you find yourself in the darkness.”

The Cranberries toured with Suede and Duran Duran, before headlining around the world.

“We were on a massive high, but at the time you don’t feel it because you’re waking up at seven and a make-up artist is prodding you because you’ve got a magazine shoot at nine, and you’re doing tour, album, tour, album, and it’s like that every day.”

She’s not whingeing, just telling it as it was. And she blames no one but herself.

“I was a workaholic, like my mother. I could never say no.”

She wasn’t good with men - a factor she puts down to her relationship with her father.

“We have the best relationship now, but he had been emotionally absent when I was growing up.

“The car accident made him that way, but at the time I couldn’t see that.”

There were a couple of messy liaisons before, at 21, she met Don. He was Duran Duran’s tour manager, a Canadian ten years her senior, and he showered her with love.

“To this day, if we’re out to dinner, he’ll take my coat, give me my chair, check out the menu for what I like. He’s a real caregiver, so protective of me.”

Dolores and Don married in 1994 in Tipperary - she famously wore a see-through dress - and spent their honeymoon camping in Galway.

“We only had five days before my next gig and I couldn’t face staying in a hotel where everyone would recognise us, so we woke up the day after our wedding in a tent, hungover and starving,” she grins.

“We had a gas stove, but no food, so I walked down to the village shop for a tin of beans and there I was, on all the front pages. I put my head down, grabbed the beans, and ran.”

A year later she started having anxiety attacks - her limbs would seize up when she was about to go on stage or when she was with strangers.

She couldn’t eat or sleep, and her weight plummeted to six stone.

Interviewers described her as moody and erratic, and speculated that she had anorexia.

In fact, she was just emotionally spent.

“When you have that sort of fame, you are bigger than your own self.

“I thought I was indestructible.

“It was only later, when I saw pictures of myself, that I realised how terrible I looked.”

Beechy Colclough, psychotherapist to the stars (he has also counselled Elton John, Michael Jackson and Robbie Williams), proved to be her salvation.

“He made me feel that it wasn’t me who was nuts, just the world around me.

“He said, ‘It’s your life. Stop being famous and get away.’ So I did.”

Taylor, now ten, was born a year after her breakdown.

“Having him gave me a whole new outlook on life.”

He was followed by Molly, now seven, and Dakota, two.

The Cranberries made a couple more albums but other band members were starting families too, “and one of them had a seriously ill child and life took over”.

Dolores and Don moved to Canada, to a log cabin home in Ontario.

“The Canadians are very grounded. I could take Taylor to school and sit in his class with a bunch of six-year-olds and just be Mum.

“I wasn’t singing, wasn’t performing, I had no website. And sometimes Don and I would go online and see all this banter on the unofficial sites, people asking ‘Where is she?’ But it was important to disconnect myself.”

The one thing she never stopped, however, was writing songs.

Her album Are You Listening? is a collection of 12 tracks, plucked from more than 30, that reflect the highs and lows of her past decade.

It is dedicated to Don’s stepmother Denise, who died of cancer in 2004. She had been like a second mother to Dolores.

There are also ballads she has dedicated to her children, to Don and to her parents, and a blisteringly angry track entitled ‘Loser’.

She’s not identifying her ‘loser’, so we can only speculate whether the lyrics ‘A two-watt light bulb is brighter than you/I’m sick and tired of people like you’ are directed at the former nanny who tried, and failed, to sue her and Don over negligence and false imprisonment claims in 2004.

Dolores seems a woman who has achieved a hard-won equilibrium.

She and Don still have their log cabin, but their main home is now in Howth, Dublin, where Ronan Keating and other entertainment and media types are near neighbours. “This is practical for the children. We’re part of the community.

“Life has changed so much for me, but I’m a normal mother, and one of the things I’m most proud of is that I’m giving my children their own normality.”

She recalls an ex-boyfriend saying to her once that if she had children, she would stop being an artist.

“But you know, living my life through their lives is my inspiration. Your career goes up and down, but your family is for ever.

“Becoming famous skewed my perspective for a while, but, underneath it all, I always knew that.”

???????????

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


- Dolores O’Riordan’s Song “Ordinary Day” has got an active support of admirers borrows and is 1 place on radio Radio 31 (Kazakhstan)! Continue to vote for a song!
- On Radio Maximum Dolores’ song “When We Were Young” has fallen with 8 to 16 place. So let’s vote actively! Let’s lift again a song on high places.
- Solo album Dolores O’Riordan “ Are You Listening? ” Has been nominated in a nomination “ Best Irish Female ” (details Here). And yesterday results of voting have been announced. Unfortunately, Dolores has not won (Cathy Davey is the winner). But all the same it is pleasant, that Dolores was among applicants for a prestigious rank is already a recognition of her musical merits in solo creativity. The theme is discussed at a forum Here.

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores 4 new wallpapers in our Gallery.

Special thanx to Farhad for these great works!

If you have your own wallpapers with Dolores and want to share, send them to us! We will upload it here with great pleasure!

Posted in Site Update |


3 new wallpapers are added to Gallery.

Special thanx to Farhad for these great works!

If you have your own wallpapers with Dolores and want to share, send them to us! We will upload it here with great pleasure!

Posted in Site Update |


• Gallery is updated. We have added 1100 Dolores’ photos in section “Dolores’ Photos”.
There will be added more photos soon!

Posted in Site Update |


There are the first 3 photos from European Border Breakers Awards where Dolores has got award (click the left button for iriginal size versions):

You can see Dolores’ old daughter Molly (7 y.o.) on the third photo! She celebrated her birthday on January, 27! She looks like her mother in childhood!

Dolores looks really happy! It’s her second music awards after she began solo-career. She has got ? Capri Music Awards 2004 for the best”Ave Maria” perfromance.

And Dolores has changed her hairstyle, as you can see! She made her hairs shoter, but they are still long behind. Maybe she will return to shot hairstyle in futute!

| Discuss in Forum

Posted in Dolores News |


Here is the new letter from Dolores to fans:

23RD JANUARY - A LETTER FROM DOLORES

Hey you Guys,
Hope you had a wonderful Holiday Season, Mine was lovely with the family, Santa was really good !!!
Sorry it’s been awhile since I wrote but I was chillin out. I began new tracks last week in Canada for the new album, sounding great and it was a blast.
Thanks so much for all of your support over the years,This weekend I’m off to Cannes to perform at the EBBA awards and after that Disneyland for my Daughter Molly’s 7th Birthday.
Keep in touch
Lot’s of Love
Dolores XX

Posted in Dolores News |


• It’s time for amazing things! Our dear Lisa sings 3 songs in Dolores style, she imitates Dolores voice SO GREAT! You know, it sounds just like Dolores sang in 1990-1991 demo-records! It’s a really wonderfull performance! Listen to all 3 tracks and you will see that it’s beautiful and really sounds like Dolores’ singing!
- Lisa - Umbrella (time - 4:31)
- Lisa - Gomenasai (time - 3:43)
- Lisa - Umka (time - 3:13)

| Discuss in Forum

Posted in Site Update |


Download new Cool Interview with Dolores! Dolores rides snowmobile, plays the piano, and performs the part of new song!!!
And there is the text of new song:
“Looked out the window, it rained today (…………..) so far away.”

Screenshots:

Image

| Discuss in Forum

Posted in Site Update |


Unfortunally Audio/Video sections aren’t working during last month, cos of technical reason. We are reuploading the stuff to new hosting. We need time to finish this work, be patient! The links has already changed to new address. So you can download reuploaded files right now (fro example Koko 2007 video concert). And there will be more and more fixed links every day! We will write when all links will be fixed.

Posted in Site Update |


Dolores made new experiment during her Acoustic Tour. She wore hat & scarf on the concert. It’s hard to remember Dolores with hat during all these years! It’s really something new.

??????? ? ????? ??????? ? ?????-2

Posted in Dolores News |


Steve DeMarchi, guitarist from Dolores’ Band, wrote new Dolores’ concert dates on his Blog in November and December. Congratulations!

29 November - BOSTON - WXRV - Charity-Fundraiser Show
30 November - DES MOINES IA. - KPTL - Charity Xmas Show
02 December - NASHVILLE TN. - WRLT - Sunday Night Concert Series
03 December - CHARLOTTESVILLE VIRGINIA - WCNR - Free Show
07 December - McALLEN TEXAS - KHKZ - Xmas Show
08 December - EL PASO TEXAS - KSII - Xmas Show
12 December - BOULDER CO. - KBCO - Radio Show
14 December - PHOENIX AZ. - KMXP - Xmas Show
15 December - PALM SPRINGS CA. - KPSI - Xmas Show
16 December - BAKERSFIELD CA. - KLLY - Lounge

Source: ???? ???????

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores is nominated in Best Irish Female Awards (by Meteor Music).

We ask all of you to support Dolores & vote for her Here

The full list of women for this nomination is:
* Andrea Corr
* Cathy Davey
* Maria Doyle Kennedy
* Roisin Murphy
* Sinead O’Connor
* Dolores O’Riordan

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores performed at concert DES MOINES IA yesterday. There were 8 songs: Linger, Ode to my Family,Ordinary Day,Zombie,When You’re Gone,Free to Decide, Loser ? Dreams.

Cranfan72 (one of cran-fans) writes that Dolores has new tattoo - 6 letters on the left arm. blink.gif Also Cranfan72 talked with Dolores after the concert. Dolores was all, but Cranfan72 says that performance was great anyway.

There is no any photo of new tattoo yet. But we will upload it as soon as possible!

Posted in Dolores News |


Source: CONFRONT Magazine, July 25, 2007
Article written by: SteveK
Published by: 25.07.2007

When CONFRONT’s Editor told me that we were being offered an interview with Dolores O’Riordan, I jumped at the opportunity. Here was my chance to finally interview someone whose music I had been listening to for years, having been a fan of the Cranberries since the very early 1990s when I bought ‘Everybody Else is Doing it, so Why Can’t We?’; CONFRONT’s interview coincided with the release of ‘Are You Listening?’, O’Riordan’s first solo effort.

My excitement turned to worry, however, because while doing research on O’Riordan, I discovered that the singer/songwriter from Limerick, Ireland is a fairly private person; what little news there is of her is fairly ordinary, and as straightforward as she and the Cranberries had been about their politics through their music, there wasn’t much controversy to build an interview around.

Fortunately what I found out while talking with the unassuming artist who was calling from Cologne, Germany, was just how easily she inspired conversation. So much so in fact, that I found myself speaking with her as if we were old friends catching up, talking about things like children, creativity, our mutual love-hate relationship with road-trip vacations and just the simple things that make life so extraordinary.

Despite having jotted down questions about the release of ‘Are You Listening?’ I found myself engrossed in conversations about her family life, getting a glimpse into how this Irish mother juggles celebrity and family. Although originally intended as a Beat Bazaar interview, Dolores’s candid simplicity with regard to herself and motherhood made it impossible to not want to share this side of her in greater detail.

“Well, in part I just really wanted to spend some seriously quality time with my family,” she explained when I mentioned that it had been 4 years between this new solo project and the last release of the Cranberries. “I’d finished with the Cranberries; we’d kind of done the full journey: five albums, the Greatest Hits…we were out of the contract and it was time to get off of the treadmill and get away from it all, go chill out and enjoy the kiddies-and have another one!”

I had noticed that one item of criticism that kept coming up in reviews I had read was that ‘Are you Listening?’ sounds so much like the Cranberries musically. Was it her intention to continue in the same musical style or was that just coincidental? After all, O’Riordan’s voice is expressly distinctive.

“Well, I didn’t really want to cut my legs off and call myself “Shorty” or anything like that. It’s still me, so it’s the same chick, the same writer. I’m a little bit more experimental though.”

While listening to the new album, what I found was that with the Cranberries there was more of a social or political message, whereas with ‘Are You Listening?’ it has become something much more personal; it’s apparent a change in her life’s perspective has been made; that the time off and the personal life she was able to foster really coloured the album.

“I suppose that’s really because I spent four years at home. I was very grounded, you know. I was first a mother, then a wife, then a daughter. Kind of making up for all the years that I toured and left my family, you know? I just wanted to stay at home and be normal and see if I’d missed anything in all those years I’d been traveling. Kind of trying to go back and catch up and hanging out with old friends again. In that time the old songwriting became a hobby again. Which is odd because when that happens you do it as a therapeutic thing, you know? You do it because you feel like it; you don’t do it because you feel like ‘Oh, we have to meet a deadline we’ve got to get an album out’ you know? Also, when you’re on tour you don’t have much life experience because you’re going from the hotel to the stage to the bus, to the hotel to the stage to the bus. And that’s it; you don’t really experience that much, you know? You’re on this kind of treadmilly thing, you know? So it’s kind of hard to get inspiration. And I suppose you take your inspiration from social stuff because when you’re traveling and you’re watching the news a bit more. But when I was at home it was more like, you know, very organic and it was a bit of a hobby to write about everyday things, ordinary things.”

Through research I also found out that Dolores spends a great deal of her time on Canadian soil.

“Well, Vancouver is lovely…I like the Vancouver mountains. (…) I like Montreal, Quebec; I’ve had a lot of good times there, I’ve had a lot of fun there socializing. (…) Done a bit of damage to the old credit card there , you know, spending a lot. (…) Good for a bit of shopping and good little restaurants and good little pubs. I think it was either Montreal or Quebec; one of them we were in for the anniversary and a wedding anniversary; we had great laughs.”

She later recounted her experience taking a road trip through Ontario, a family vacation much like any of us have taken with our parents at one time or another. Her story brought back many memories of childhood voyages and cranky yet fun excursions. Here are a few excerpts:

“Yeah, the other half decided ‘Let’s take an RV down to Niagara’ and the baby wouldn’t sit down the whole way, you know? So all the way down to Niagara it was like ‘Wah!’ it was so funny; and trying to get the kids to sit down in an RV is really difficult, you know? It’s quite hilarious; my poor husband was fit to bust by the time we got to Niagara Falls; he was like ‘Oh, my God I’m going to go crazy!’ because the kids were giving out and stuff, you know [like] ‘I’ve got to go to the bathroom!’ and he was like ‘Oh, God, okay, can you balance there?’ It was so much fun I don’t think we’ll be doing the RV again.

“It’s not just the driving it’s the stress of driving; and then you get stuck in rush hour in Toronto (…) and there’s naught you can do about it. And then, you know, it’s like ‘I’m Hungry!’ and ‘Well, okay, there’s some bread and butter’, but ‘Yeah but I want something else’.

“We drove from Ontario about five, six hours down to Niagara and we stayed there; they have great little lands there; stuff for the kids to spend time playing on their own machines; it’s a good fun place, Niagara is. Then we did Marineland as well. That’s great fun as well…good rides there. You always feel like puking afterwards but it feels good at the time, you know…those dangerous rides. It’s kind of one of those funny things, too; when the kids get to that age where they want to do the roller coasters. And you’re thinking ‘Hey, man! I’m so beyond that I’m an old lady, here!’ but they’re going ‘Come on! Come on!’ and then you just kind of go and you just feel like ‘Oh my God, I’m so sick!’ How do kids like those things spinning around and going upside down and shaking around and all that?”

In an effort to get back to the topic of music , I asked one of the questions I had always wanted an answer to and now finally had the opportunity to ask: What is it with Ireland? Is there something in the water that keeps turning out so many great musicians on such an epic scale? U2, Van Morrison and Sinead O’Connor, to name a few, all hail from the “Green Isle” and though varied in their musical styles, all seem to share that same passion. Not surprisingly, Dolores’s answer rotated quickly back to the topic of children.

“I would say it’s kind of very much a part of the culture, music; we have the Celtic music and the Celtic people are very musical-you know, the Scottish people are very musical as well-and so you have that kind of background and in primary school all the kids have to play the tin whistle when they were five or six. They kind of really push it on some of us in school, you know? Get the little small ones playing the tin whistle or the pipe or playing something, you know? It’s nice to get kids playing music on their own because then when they’re hitting their teens and they’re going through their tough times they can go off to their rooms and play with their instrument, you know?”

Even a question like “What was the first and last concert you attended” seemed to bring back memories of her kiddies. “The first concert I ever went to was the Waterboys in Croom, in County Limerick. And the most recent one I’ve gone to was probably my bass player’s with Tin Lizzy in Dublin (…) it was rocking. But I had to leave early because I was very pregnant and it was vibrating. I don’t think they use in-ears so the stage was really rocking, right? And the baby was going nuts because I was about eight months pregnant. It was like vibrating the baby.”

I think most notably the point at which it had become clear that Dolores’s life had changed from rock star to mother over the course of those four years spent at home with her children came when I asked what her musical guilty pleasures were.

“Uh, Sesame Street, maybe?” She said which made me laugh. This wasn’t exactly what I had expected this icon of mine to answer. “But I’m not embarrassed, though; I’m kind of proud of it. I think Sesame Street is brilliant music. What’s that guy’s name? is it [Jim] Hanson? His stuff is great and he has the bear in the big blue house and stuff. And I just think that he’s so melodic and my kids listen to it and at home you just find yourself singing along. But I’m not really embarrassed about it. I don’t really get embarrassed because I think it’s important to be yourself and be proud of your choices and who you are.”

I assume that as an artist and a working parent, the decision to take time off from your life, your passion and your dreams could seem daunting. But it is obvious that with her children comes a new life Dolores cherishes and feels it imperative to make time for. All too often we hear stories of parents in the entertainment industry who feel that juggling career and family is a daunting task, children regularly being pushed into the arms of necessary third party helpers and surrogate parents so that the celebrity can take advantage of the moment and keep the momentum of their careers going. Yet this talented artist seems to take it all in stride.

The past four years might have taken the spotlight off of Dolores O’Riordan, but the May 2007 release of her first solo effort ‘Are You Listening?’ will certainly help to edge it back in her direction. I believe Allmusic.com said it best when they printed: “That’s why [the album] is a success as a solo debut: it doesn’t resurrect O’Riordan’s earliest work as much as reconnect with it, and she hasn’t sounded this purposeful, or made a record this satisfying, since the days of “Linger.”

Posted in Stuff, Articles |


We have added 78 great photos from concert in Russia. You can Download 276 photos from Dolores’ concert in Moscow in our Gallery right now! Hi-res photos, good view, great Dolores…;) We will add more photos soon!

Authors of therse photos agreed to support our Fan-Club, and it’s exclusive stuff specially for our site! We allow to everyone place some of these photos on your sites, but DON’T delete site-mark & don’t change file-names (cos there are names of authors in file-names).

Posted in Site Update |


- Download 198 great photos in Our Gallery. Thank to all fans who sent photos to us. We will add new soon
- Site updates are ugraded and automated. Now it’s really easy to add it & there will be often updates.
- We have problems with our Audio/Video stuff. You can’t download it right now, but we are reuploading the stuff right now and we will write when we will fix it.

Posted in Site Update |


Dolores cancelled her world tour. After her mealing poisoning in Russia & 2 cancelled concerts she gave 3 gigs:

15TH NOVEMBER - BASEL, SWITZERLAND (AS SPECIAL GUEST OF RUFUS WAINWRIGHT) - FESTSAAL MESSE BASEL
16TH NOVEMBER - MANNHEIM, GERMANY - ALTE FEUERWACHE
17TH NOVEMBER - GENT, BELGIUM - HANDELSBEURS

But jne fan from Switzerland wrote that Dolores has got injection and then she performed. She was ill during last 3 concert. And polish press writes that Dolores has pleurisy. It’s not a dangerous illness, but Dolores need to treat herself and have more rest.

And there is the official letter from Dolores:

19TH NOVEMBER - APPOLOGY FROM DOLORES - REMAINDER OF EUROPEAN TOUR (Lille, Paris, Luxemburg, Warsaw and Prague) CANCELLED DUE TO ILLNESS

Hello to all!
Just a note to say sorry for canceling the tour, I need to rest a while as I have been traveling and touring for the better part of a year. The Doc says rest and I’ll get better. I will come back in the new year.

Love to you all and Happy Holidays!
Sorry once again.
-Dolores XX

We wish Dolores get well again! And we hope that fans will understand if Dolores does something, that means that she really need to do. Let’s support Dolores!

Source: Official site

Posted in Dolores News |


• Dolores O’Riordan has visited Russia with concert! Russian fans are so active! There made a lot of photos (more then 200), many video-audio-records in high quality. We will share by it a little later. Russian forum is crazy of it. She was there. We made 2 portraits of her and gave it to her. And also we ordered a special medallion with her face and also gave it to her. And we gave her 45 daffodils with words “… and the daffodils look lovely today”. We hope she will return someday to our country and I will be there too.
• We learned a food poisoning occured and two canceled most expected Italian gigs. We have sent a letter to Dolores. There we express our deepest regret on the occasion of this incident. • Download 149 photos from russian concert in our Gallery (other photos will be uploaded there later)
• Video & audio from concert will be on the site a bit later. Keep visiting our site.

Posted in Dolores News |


Source: www.laopiniondemurcia.es

The former singer of The Cranberries shows her darkest and most personal side in her last album, “Are you listening”, which she is presenting at a concert in Murcia.

Dolores O’riordan’s (the former singer of the famous band The Cranberries) press conference was held yesterday at the “Narciso Yepes” room in the Murcia’s audotorium, in order to present her concert, that is actually taking place today.

The artist, who arrived free-and-easy at the press room, started a solo career last May that has made her tour around a half of the world, and now she stops in Murcia to present her new album, “Are You Listening?”. An album that is - as she confesses- very autobiographical and personal. The artist chose that title, because it seemed “very humble” for her and she was “very surprised, because nobody had never used it before”, she said.

The singer assured that, at the concert she is giving tonight, she will sing not only new songs, but also old hits, “I like singing the old songs, because they make people remember something they have lived.”

The artist, who describes these moments as the most beautiful of her career, says that “when I look at the audience in a concert and I see they are singing my songs, I feel they are indetified with what I’m telling along them.”

This fact means for her that her lyrics become a dance, since “it’s beautiful that my lyrics are still alive”. Dolores states with a smile on her face that she’s going to try to “vary things in order to make more newnesses.”

The whole world remembers her with her band partners around, but she is now moving through the world of music with an own voice; although she is not with The Cranberries anymore, she doesn’t forget them, because there aren’t such big differences between “that Dolores” and the current one. The artist thinks, as she declared yesterday, that “the biggest difference is actually a gravity issue. The body grows old and that makes you change.”

This thirty-six-year-old singer, has had three children during the time she has been “standing” on her musical career, and this - she says- “has changed my body a lot”. But O’riordan is convinced that “when the body falls the soul rises and you keep on growing”, that’s why she continues on her musical career with new challenges to accomplish, even though she has to deal with them alone.

The singer complained about the few time that she has had during the tour to know more deeply the places where she has to sing, that’s why she wishes she could enjoy the city of Murcia much more.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


10.09.2007 Dates of Dolores’ gigs in november:

04.11 - MURCIA, SPAIN - AUDITORIO
05.11- MADRID, SPAIN - LA RIVIERA
06.11- SAN SEBASTIAN, SPAIN - KURSAL
08.11- PALMA DE MALLORCA, SPAIN - AUDITORI
10.11- MOSCOW, RUSSIA - B1 MAXIMUM CLUB
12.11- MODENA, ITALY - VOX CLUB
13.11 - FIRENZE, ITALY - SASCHALL
15.11- BASEL, SWITZERLAND (AS SPECIAL GUEST OF RUFUS WAINWRIGHT) - FESTSAAL MESSE BASEL
16.11- MANNHEIM, GERMANY - ALTE FEUERWACHE
17.11- GENT, BELGIUM - HANDELSBEURS
20.11- LILLE, FRANCE - L’AERO
21.11- PARIS, FRANCE - OLYMPIA
22.11- LUXEMBURG, LUXEMBURG - VENUE TO BE CONFIRMED

Source: http://www.doloresoriordan.ie

Posted in Dolores News |


Source: radio 89,7 FM ”Obiteljski radio”
Published: october, 2007

Part 1
Dolores O’riordan is tonite’s special guest. Last friday she call us by telephone and asked for what area code is +385, when we told her, her reaction was:

Dolores: Croatia, of course i was trying to figure out from where i recieved a phone call.

After introducing myself, i used my best weapon, my birth date, 27th of January, and she answered:

Dolores: Ohh the same as my husband and my daughter, perfect!!

She asked how’s the weather in Croatia, we replied back asking the same.

Dolores: Absolutely amazing, it’s really sunny today, pretty hot, i went out in a walk in one t-shirt which is kinda bizzare, it’s usually cold..But this october we have such a lovely weather in Ireland.

October, or better say Halloween night in 2002, many of Croatian people remember so well..31st of october, five years ago she was here with the Cranberries, so we asked if she remembers that too..

Dolores: I do remember, actaully. I remember people were so emotional during the concert I remember even seeing people crying.

As we heard Dolores wrote a song called Croatia, is that true??

Dolores: Oh yes, it was probably i was so touched seeing this people crying, i realise Croatian people suffer emotionally a lot and i was so sad about it and that’s why I wrote this song.

We asked her about some details of song and does she intend to release it someday?

Dolores: Yeah, the chorus goes ”Calling Croatia, I comfort you now” (my note: i think she says calling croatia instead of call me Croatia, as the overvoice said but im not sure about it), i felt like im giving them consolation, music can be an escape if u can reach the people and fill them with music, in some way you are connected, i felt good touching people hearts. It’s all about that, just go there. In every country it’s different, you think you have problems, but when you visit other countries you see that there are even more challenges there.(i dont get this sentence but she said smth like this). My eyes are always wide open and when I travel somewhere else I try to learn something new. For the first time I was in South America, it was unbelievable, people are amazing, strong, witty (smth like have lotsa humor) but also so emotional.

In South America, audience really like the song ”When we were young” from the Are You Listening album which u can listen to now. Stay with us.


Part 2
Beside the music on tonite’s show we can present an exclusive interview with Dolores O’Riordan. For four years she doesn’t play with the Cranberries, but this year she revitalised her career, she recorded new album, get together a new band and started touring.
On drums we have Graham Hopkins (ex player of Therapy), Marco Mendoza from Thin Lizzy and Steve de Marchi who was playing support guitar with the Cranberries, on her band Dolores says:

Dolores: I know Marco for about 8-9 years, my husband for about 15 years, so he’s an old friend and brilliant bass player, Denny DeMarchi is Steve’s brother, their father was concert pianist, he was amazing artist, but he passed away when Steve and Denny were young. It’s so nice to see that after that they continue to play, Steve on guitar and Denny on keyboards.

How did u all gather in one place?

Dolores: DeMarchi’s are old friends of the Burton’s, for almost 25 years, my husband decided to hire Marco and it happend in Los Angeles, and Graham well it seems we just bump into him. (i think i can hear her laughing in the back, lol)

Were you all excited about releasing a debut solo album Are you listening?

Dolores: Yeah I was really excited, it was brilliant, you know, it was nice especially after having 4 years off. I had to start from the beggining, start to build my career again, but it feels nice as i think we did something which turn out great. It’s really hard nowdays for the artist cause the music industry has changed.

Most of the time you write songs about things that happen in your life, things that happen to you directly, but do you ever get inspired about things that happen to other people, that u meet along the way, the kind of stories that don’t happen to you directly but have an affect on you?

Dolores: Oh yeah, definatelly, you know, Ecstasy was not written about me, but about people who had problems with depression, drug addiction. I met so many people through my life, so i write about that side of human spirit, when people suffer, how they survive and live with it and how to be strong. Life is not always easy.

This is Ecstasy, so stay tuned to hear more from Dolores O’Riordan..(but they play Apple of my eyes instead of Ecstasy, xaxaxaxa, as what i can hear it..)


Part 3
Dolores O’Riordan is special guest of the tonite’s Total Music Info show. She finished first part of the tour, which included
Europe, USA and South America. Only part if the dates of the second European tour was announced which starts in November. Are you looking forward to the new shows and are u thinking of coming back to Croatia?

Dolores: I totally look forward to go back, you know, it should be great. It’s been a long time, u said 2002, that’s 5 years, well i’ll be near so I could drop by.

On Official site www.doloresoriordan.ie, most known singer is writing her tour diary (lol where did he see that, cause she didn’t write much..xexe) What is your experienece while travelling and meeting fans?

Dolores: Fans are brilliant, you know, i probably feel that as i write my own songs and the fans are there to give the songs the complete meanings. I live my songs in one way, but it can have different meaning to any other person. The audience (fans) make song alive and all other things why songs keep on existing.

Dolores was one of the favourite singer of the late Pope John Paul II, how she remembers him?

Dolores: Oh I loved him, I love John Paul II, it was lovely. He was the Man who loved people and kids. Something special was arround him, he had aura. It was amazing.

That’s the main reason why Dolores was chosen to sing ”Ave Maria” for Passion of Christ, movie by Mel Gibson. That was not the only connection with the acting and movie, she also had cameo role in Adam Sandler’s movie ”Click” we asked if she sees herself in a movie and what kind of role she would wanna act?

Dolores: I don’t think i could act actually because, i think what happens when you are a person who’s very well known for being who you are so it’s hard to be somebody else. Im not good in transfering in somebody else, some role because im totally into myself, even when i was a little child. We had shows in school, i knew how to sing but never was good for acting as i think i dont know how to act.

I sit true that she loves soap operas?? (my note: where did he heard that, lol)

Dolores: Ah, no. I just wacth ”Carnation street” but i havent wacth that now this year as i was touring.

Posted in Interviews with Dolores |


Dolores & frontman of italian band Negramaro Giuliano Sangiorgi recorded new song “Senza Fiato” for ”Cemento armato” soundtrack. Marco Mantani the director of this film. Today is release of this film.

mp3 “Senza Fiato”: http://rapidshare.com/files/60777226/Dolores_O_Riordan___Giuliano_Sangiorgi_-_Senza_Fiato.mp3.html

Photos of Dolores & Giuliano
http://img404.imageshack.us/img404/6723/31es5.jpg
http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/9673/33cs5.jpg

Discussion about the song is here:
http://www.the-cranberries.ru/phorum/index.php?showtopic=835

Song Lyrics:
http://www.doloresoriordan.ru/eng/lyrics.htm#senza

Posted in Dolores News |


New Dolores O’Riordan’s videoclip When We Were Young” is accessible for free download in internet! Clip director is popular clipmaker OLIVIER DAHAN. The Cranberries worked with him before (he made great clips “Salvation”, “Promises”, “This Is The Day” and “Animal Instinct”).

You can download clip here: http://www.u-manfilms.com/films/dolores_dahan.mov (60 Mb).
Alternative link (the same video): http://www.doloresoriordan.net/dol/Dolores%20O’Riordan-WWWY.rar

Download screenshots here: http://www.doloresoriordan.net/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=3400

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores will visited South America with concerts! For example, concert in Colombia will be on 2007.07.30! Congratulate all cran-fans who waited Dolores during years, and finely have opportunity to visit her concerts! So don’t miss concert, maybe she will perform in your country!

And also it means that solo-tour is not so short at all. We are sure, that the reason is success of Dolores.
There are links to some articles about Dolores’ tour in South America:

http://img367.imageshack.us/img367/7004/foto0001fn6.png
http://www.gaymagazine.cl/musica/?contenido=644
http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb271/S…/signature2.jpg
http://www.10musica.com/interior/noticia.php?idx=4345
http://www.clarin.com/diario/2007/07/21/es…los/c-01401.htm
http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb271/S…nte-dolores.jpg

Posted in Dolores News |


In spite of problems with Hopkins’ (drummer) health, Dolores’ North America tour goes on. Yesterday was San Francisco concert. Graham played too and looked very well.

Dolores sang “Promises” for the first time during this tour, and also performed song “Willow Pattern” once more.

There are some  rumours that Dolores’ world tour can be continued in South America and some another places in August. But there is no official information about it yet. So maybe it won’t happen.

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores has got another trouble during her North America tour. Yesterday drummer Hopkins had seizure during Los-Angeles concert!

There was ordinary beginning: Dolores came to the stage, played “Zombie”, then “Angel Fire” and “Animal Instinct”. And after that public noticed that drummer had spasms. Dolores asked to turn lights on and call to emergency. Then Dolores came to the stage and said: “My drummer feels bad”. Then the concert was canceled. Even Dolores & her band played only 3 songs, the audience applauded to her very loud.

It is still a question will be North America tour go on or not. Concert in San Francisco is planned today.

Some fans tell, that drummer felt bad before, and Dolores asked him did he feel well or not on the Cologne concert.

We hope that Graham will be fine soon and return to Dolores’ band!

Posted in Dolores News |


Fans who visited concert in Chicago write that Dolores made new tattoo. It’s on her right hand, under tattoo “celtic cross”. New tattoo is something like “multicolored celtic ornamental pattern”. Dolores has 3 tattoos now! (on her both hands).

There is no photos of new tattoo yet, but when it will be accessible, we will upload it here.

Posted in Dolores News |


O’Riordan redeems ’90s with a warbling roar

When the keening singer Dolores O’Riordan started her show Friday night at the Fillmore, she did something very wrong.

She opened with “Zombie,” a signature smash from the Irish band she put on the shelf five years ago, the Cranberries.

“Zombie” - like the other jangling ‘berries anthem, “Linger,” that seemed to be everywhere at the time - helped make the ’90s a cavernous musical yawn, with its sonic listlessness and nattering, obvious lyrics.

It was boorish. It was braying. It was a reminder of every awful tune that rock’s worst decade had yielded.

It didn’t have to be that way. There are Cranberries songs most delicious, and over the course of the night, O’Riordan picked a few. The thundering sound of O’Riordan’s quartet may have muffled the swishy girl-group sound of “When You’re Gone,” but it didn’t diminish its prettiness.

But opening with “Zombie,” with its rushed strum and that high-pitched howling thing O’Riordan used as its chorus? It could only have been worse if she had hit the stage while step-dancing.

Luckily, O’Riordan, the imp with the shiny black hair and nasal brogue, then unveiled a tiny clutch of solo tunes that were both achingly potent and bristlingly inventive.

With its chopsticky piano riff, phase-shifted guitars, haunted harmonies and complex lullaby melodies, “Black Widow,” off O’Riordan’s new solo CD, Are You Listening?, seemed to be something only the avant-oddball Kate Bush could pull off properly. But there was O’Riordan, a slip of a woman, rocking to-and-fro, crowing mournfully about the empty life and emptier death of her mother-in-law, in an atmosphere most haunted.

The crunching, tinkling “Stay with Me,” the simple sentiment and rhythmic thwack of “When We Were Young” - those songs sparkled.

And even though her warble infected squeaky new tunes such as “Angel Fire,” it seemed as though O’Riordan had redeemed herself, redeemed every wrong the ’90s ever achieved.

Maybe there’s hope for Michael Flatley yet.

Posted in Review, Stuff |


There were thoughts that Dolores is pregnant since june, when her belly became bigger, even she was very thin. She had flat belly on promo-photos and on march-april photos (http://www.doloresoriordan.net/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=50). But we weren’t so sure before, that’s why we became sure only now. Her pregnancy is obvious now. Just look at photos from recent concerts and video from Koko:
Photo 1
Photo 2
Photo 3

Maybe toru is shot because of Dolores’ pregnancy. Dolores performed before when she was expecting a Molly. Congratulate Dolorse with this event. We wish her the best!

Posted in Dolores News |


Yesterday’s concert in Washington was cancelled. Dolores’ mates said that Dolores has broken her front tooth when she had dinner & ate japanease crackers!

She came to the dentist yesterday. Her concert in Philadelphia isn’t cancelled yet.

We hope that Dolores will get better soon and continue her tour! We wish to restore Dolores’  health! We are with you, Dolores!

Posted in Dolores News |


Source: Washington Post
Published: July 6, 2007
Author: Catherine P. Lewis

DOLORES O’RIORDAN’S AIRY, haunting vocals were so fundamental to the sound of the Cranberries that any recording featuring her voice sounds reminiscent of that group. Such is the case with “Are You Listening?,” her first full solo album since the band’s split nearly five years ago. Luckily, though, the album is more than just a nostalgia trip: O’Riordan and her songs are so enchanting that her music feels light and fresh rather than just a retread of the Cranberries’ best elements.

The songs here are clearly inspired by the events in her life since her old band’s final album, from the birth of her daughter on the enticing, lulling “Ordinary Day” to her love for her husband on “Apple of My Eye,” which rises above its overly doting lyrics with a warm, lilting delivery.

But life during O’Riordan’s time off was not all butterflies and apple pie: “Black Widow” is a response to her mother-in-law’s battle with cancer, and her howling frustration is reminiscent of the passion in the Cranberries’ “Zombie.” The song begins as a delicate duet between her voice and a staccato piano line, but her fervor intensifies to match a more aggressive rock sound. Though O’Riordan’s graceful voice may never truly sound angry, she conveys her fury with a frailty that makes her sorrow all the more heartbreaking.

Posted in Review, Stuff |


‘Listening’ proves a challenge at O’Riordan gig
By Christopher John Treacy / Music Review
Tuesday, July 10, 2007 - Updated: 07:40 PM EST

There’s loud and then there’s loud. And then there’s Dolores O’Riordan’s show at Avalon Monday night.

Plenty of rock ’n’ roll is volume-centric; it goes with the territory. Tool. Rush. Zeppelin. Sabbath.

O’Riordan? Not so much.

And yet, at Monday night’s show in support of her solo debut, “Are You Listening?” the former Cranberries vocalist performed at levels way too far in the red.

O’Riordan and her four-piece band brought their own snazzy soundboard - so shiny and state-of-the-art it looked as if it could fly a spacecraft. Why lug a soundboard across the country that produces an unflattering mix? It boggles the mind.

O’Riordan sure looked cute, though. She’s as skinny as ever, and her once spiky head of what-color-will-it-be-this-time hair is now a demure shoulder-length, dyed matte black to match her leather jacket and belted cotton dress.

Performing an 18-song set split straight down the middle between new and old, she walked onstage strumming her guitar for a rousing opening run through “Zombie” from the Cranberries’ 1994 sophomore disc, “No Need to Argue,” exciting the skimpy but enthusiastic crowd.

They stayed excited, particularly up front, through “Angel Fire” with its whisper-to-a-yelp verse-to-chorus contrast and the edgy pop of “Animal Instinct,” another Cranberries tune, from 1999’s “Bury the Hatchet.”

But despite the consistent quality of the rhythm section (Marco Mendoza on bass and Graham Hopkins on drums), by “Apple of My Eye” it became clear the acoustics were a disaster.

At times O’Riordan seemed spot-on, but sometimes she was so far up in the mix her vocals became a distorted screech, while at other turns the band’s din swallowed her singing whole. The real shame of it is that you could tell she was singing 100 percent live, no tracking or processed tuning - yet her effort was spoiled by a combination of volume and treble.

Without any massive outbursts from the band, “Ordinary Day” was much tighter, featuring O’Riordan’s acoustic guitar accompaniment. Likewise, “Human Spirit” came off well, sung with conviction and surefootedness. But “Black Widow,” the most adventurous of the new songs, suffered - the long instrumental passage lumbered along, leaving the track’s nuances buried in the rubble.

Pared-down encores of “Linger” and “Dreams” came off pleasingly enough, and overall, O’Riordan’s solo debut is strong. But when she poses the question “Are You Listening?” as she has with the CD’s title, the best answer might be, “Absolutely - but we can’t hear you.”
DOLORES O’RIORDAN with JESSIE BAYLIN at Avalon, Monday.

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Source: http://www.boston.com
Author: Marc Hirsh
Published: July 11, 2007

As the familiar grinding chords of “Zombie” filled the air before Dolores O’Riordan even set foot on the Avalon stage Monday night to join her band, it was as though the Cranberries frontwoman wanted to waste no time reminding the audience who she was.

Yes, there was a new album, her solo debut, “Are You Listening?,” to promote. But stepping out on her own for the first time without the safety net of one of the most popular groups of the ’90s behind her, O’Riordan hedged her bets by giving the audience what it wanted right from the start.

The move turned out to be largely unnecessary. The crowd saved its greatest enthusiasm for the Cranberries songs that made up half of the set, but there was plenty left for the new material. “Apple of My Eye” managed to be gentle and pounding simultaneously, while the ominous guitar arpeggio and keyboard drone that opened “Stay With Me” eventually gave way to booming, heavy stop-start chords in the chorus as O’Riordan let loose with a throaty wail.

The next song, “Black Widow,” tried the same formula and fell short, revealing some of the weaknesses in her material in the process. A few others, like “Ordinary Day” and “Pretty,” seemed to go nowhere. Worse, O’Riordan’s voice seemed to be hit-or-miss (”Linger” was particularly disappointing), not to mention too idiosyncratic for the sound system to keep up. The shift from the whispering verse to the belting chorus of “Angel Fire” was abrupt and extreme, and feedback plagued most of the songs toward the end.

But if those problems frustrated O’Riordan, she pressed on without complaint while Graham Hopkins’s drumming anchored a sharp and muscular band, making “I Can’t Be With You” pulse with energy and propelling the strummy, thumping closer “Dreams.”

By then, O’Riordan had spent an hour and a half displaying a comfort and ease onstage that even a five-year hiatus couldn’t erase.

With a folk-group lineup of acoustic guitar and electric bass behind her, opener Jessie Baylin sang an engaging set in a voice reminiscent of a drama-free Amy Winehouse hooked on roots-pop instead of jazz and the girl-group era.

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores O’Riordan
by John Voket
EDGE Boston Contributor
Wednesday Jul 4, 2007
Source: http://www.edgeboston.com

Dolores O’Riordan. Her first stop on her U.S. is next week in Boston.
Dolores O’Riordan.

As early as 1993 Dolores O’Riordan and her band mates in the Cranberries found them-selves having to dispel rumors about her pending departure from the band to pursue a solo career. But it wasn’t until a decade later that the Cranberries would play their last few gigs, several as openers for the Rolling Stones, before its members went their separate ways.

Almost immediately after becoming a self-proclaimed “free agent,” the sprightly soprano began develop-ing material that became her first solo offering, Are You Listening. The May release has been well-received and contains a variety of palettes on which O’Riordan has portrayed various life-altering ex-periences including the death of her much beloved mother-in-law (Black Widow,) her marriage to Don Burton (Apple of My Eye,) and the birth of her youngest daughter Dakota which inspired her first solo single (Ordinary Day.)

After filling June with more than a dozen live shows across Europe, O’Riordan hits the states with a Boston gig July 9, and subsequently winds her way through most major markets including New York, Philly, Chicago, Denver and Seattle before wrapping in Vancouver on the 23rd.

She recently talked with EDGE about her new project, the tour and some of the events in her life that have influenced her art, post-Cranberries.

EDGE: Your advance indicates the songwriting for Are You Listening took place over al-most four years. Which song was completed first?

Dolores O’Riordan: Apple of My Eye was first. I wrote that while I was still touring with the Cranberries in 2003. I remember I was out on the road without my husband and my kids, and all I had to keep me company at times was a picture of him I would carry along from hotel room to hotel room. And I wrote that one of those nights when I was on my own sitting in one of those lonely hotel rooms.

EDGE: It has been publicized that the song Black Widow was created for the Spiderman II movie soundtrack, and ended up on the new solo album instead. Can you put any rumors about that number to rest by clarifying the background of that really emotional song?

O’Riordan: I think the Spider Man thing is just a rumor, something that developed a life of its own on the Internet. Around the time the Cranberries decided to take a break, I learned my dear mother-in-law had cancer. I remember beginning writing that song on a particularly sad day in Octo-ber. You know when you are in your 20s you think you are going to live forever, but as you get older you begin to find out there’s so much of that disease in the world it’s really very disturbing.

EDGE: I know for some songwriters it’s a hard question to answer but can you elevate a few of the new songs to being your favorites?

O’Riordan: I quite like the piano part on Black Widow. I had the melody down and I remember playing it for my husband and he said it’s really nice, but it’s really weird. And I think that’s when we started thinking it might be right for a soundtrack. He said it was ’very spidery.’ Then we started going through what we went through with my mother-in-law and I started putting lyrics to it. The way it all unfolded was such an experimental process for me, never really knowing what it was going to come out like in the end. But in the end I really ended up liking it because it is so different, you know? In the Spirit has a similar kind of piano part, and that song was particularly rewarding for me. I wrote it during a period when I was sort of looking for something of my own mind. Over the years I spent so much time with the Cranberries, touring about and all, and in a way I became this famous singer person. But I wanted to know who I really was, what it would be like for me to take away the singer and take away that whole world. And over those four years it has been really good because the self-discovery had a rejuvenating effect on me.

EDGE: Your youngest, Dakota Rain, was born during the process of creating Are You Listening. Did the pregnancy or her subsequent arrival have any influence on the songs?

O’Riordan: Yes, Ordinary Day is written about her. But you know my children don’t really know much about mommy being a singer. I’m the one around the house doing the dishes and making the dinner. We try to keep things pretty normal. I’m really careful about fame because I got famous really young and it didn’t affect me really well. I think so many parents hope their children might get into the public eye, and then when the kids are 13 or 14 they can’t handle it. You won’t find me pushing my kids to be in any of my videos or anything like that. I try to keep them out of the public eye, and keep their feet on the ground.

” … I really try to live one day at a time. That’s my motto - I live in the moment and enjoy what I’m going through now. I’m not going to think about next year because it may never come, right?”

EDGE: I’m sure with all the experiences your husband had as road manager for Duran Duran, having his guidance and experience has been really important as well.

O’Riordan: It’s very good actually. I think there is something extra special about having your spouse managing your career, because they love you and they’re not going to push you too hard. And they know when to pull back on the workload. It’s great to have that symbiosis. He supports every-thing I do, but he doesn’t get involved in the creative process. He is more like the agent, talking to me about what is coming up in terms of shows and keeping his eye on the business end of things.

EDGE: You worked with Morgan Page on a remix of the first single Ordinary Day. Will that remix be an exclusive, or do you have designs on working with other DJs, producers or remix art-ists on their interpretations of your new material?

O’Riordan: I think it was an experiment to see how it would work out for the sake of mak-ing a dance-oriented thing for the teenagers and the dance crowd. I don’t have any plans for other re-mixes.

EDGE: You collaborated with Zuccero, who also shared the studio with Sting, Eric Clap-ton and Sheryl Crow on that same album. In the process of putting your new album together, did any-one approach you about having any famous guests collaborating?

O’Riordan: Nobody approached me because I was completely un-approachable. I was in the forest. I had no email, I just shut the doors on the whole world so I could just have my own private experience. I had spent 15 years bouncing ideas off other people, and I really wanted to prove to myself I could pull it off by myself. It was lovely to just shut the doors on the planet - forget about the fact that I was a singer or entertainer - and suddenly launch this therapeutic process. I used the time to get rid of my own issues, and to talk about my own issues in the music.

EDGE: In the process of songwriting or producing, was there a conscious effort to craft certain songs to appeal to perhaps younger fans who might consider a band like The Cranberries a “classic” act?

O’Riordan: I don’t really think about my work like that. Writing was such a therapeutic process for me. I was just locked away from the world and I wasn’t really thinking consciously about the audience that would be receiving the music. If I was I might not have been so creative with the lyr-ics, and been so open with my heart. During the process I had another baby, and I started painting and thinking I might never go back to this at all. For me it was just about getting myself away from every-body and thinking about my own life.

EDGE: What artists do you look to for inspiration as a songwriter, or as a really dynamic performer?

O’Riordan: There are hundreds of people I think are great performers and songwriters. But I don’t think about it much when I put pen to paper and I get down to the piano and it’s coming out of my heart and soul. I love David Bowie, but I never conscientiously sit down and try to write a song like David Bowie, I’m never going to sit down and try and write a song like Changes. That would sound really false because it wouldn’t really be creative. There are so many artists I admire, you know, David Bowie, Metallica, Aerosmith, Bjork, Annie Lennox, David Crosby, Sinead O’Connor, but I don’t try to copy them because I think I have my own style and my own gift and I try to keep in tune to that.

EDGE: Besides this upcoming tour and further promotion for the new album, what else is on your plate for the coming year? Are you looking ahead to your second solo album?

O’Riordan: Absolutely not. If I can manage to go through with this tour that will be great. I may fall in love with it, and I might go longer, but I really try to live one day at a time. That’s my motto - I live in the moment and enjoy what I’m going through now. I’m not going to think about next year because it may never come, right?

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Source: http://jam.canoe.ca/
Author: JASON MacNEIL

TORONTO - With Irish group The Cranberries currently nothing more than a memory and with no plans to get back together anytime soon, it might be quite a while before fans hear some of the band’s biggest hits. Fortunately, the group’s lead singer, Dolores O’Riordan, isn’t one to distance herself from her musical past.

O’Riordan’s early Saturday evening 85-minute set at the Phoenix Concert Theatre centred on her recent, long-awaited debut solo album Are You Listening?, but the performer made sure to include some of The Cranberries’ repertoire beginning with the harder, edgier Zombie. Dressed in a black T-shirt, matching mini skirt and fishnet stockings, and looking like she just came from a Joan Jett concert, O’Riordan got the crowd on her side early.

“Thank you very much! I hope you are listening to Are You Listening?” she said prior to starting Angel Fire and quickly going into the mid-tempo Animal Instinct which once again showed her unique set of pipes, a set that can turn on a dime from a precious ethereal tone to a throaty howl.

Following the melancholic piano-driven “love song” Apple Of My Eye, O’Riordan and her tight, note-perfect four-piece band went straight into Ordinary Day, the lead single off the new album. What was more surprising was how enthusiastic the crowd, which filled about two-thirds of the venue, was toward the radio-friendly tune. Little coaxing was needed from O’Riordan for a sing-along.

After taking a picture of the crowd, the chatty 35-year-old went back in time with the melancholic Ode To My Family, the leadoff song from The Cranberries’ 1994 album No Need To Argue. Yet things took a slight downturn with the ensuing Human Spirit with O’Riordan rocking out as much as one can with a tin whistle. As well, Black Widow, inspired by the death of her mother-in-law, was an eerie effort with keyboardist Denny Demarchi repeating a carnival-like series of notes throughout.

These were the exceptions though to stronger numbers like the plodding, unnerving and heavy Stay With Me that sounded like a long lost cousin of Led Zeppelin’s Kashmir. Leaving the stage briefly as the band fleshed out the song, O’Riordan returned with the short and sweet Pretty, which lived up to its title.

Perhaps the highlight of the set, though, was the tender When You’re Gone, which would have fit perfectly as the slow dance number at any ’50s high school prom. Swaying with her electric guitar as she performed, O’Riordan earned one of the biggest cheers of the night. Just as pleasing was the punchy follow-up Loser, which could have been mistaken for The Cranberries in 2007.

For the homestretch, the performer opted to go back in time with a frantic, garage-rock rendition of Salvation that had O’Riordan dancing around as if she was a teenager. The four-song encore also closed with her strumming an acoustic guitar and easing her way into Linger before rounding things off with Dreams.

Opening the show was Jessie Baylin and two supporting musicians. Baylin, who has a new album entitled You, played an adequate 30-minute set highlighted by Leave Your Mark.

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Dolores changed her coiffure and image!
Download new photos here:
- 73 photos from Montreal concert
- 12 photos from Toronto concert (7 July)

Dolores’ image during last photo sessions and concerts was dark, black, sometimes official… It was like Gothic. But we all know that Dolores like to change her image very often, and she did it again!

Dolores begins her North America tour with new image and coiffure. She sut her hairs, and has coiffure which she has never hdd! She weared strange and shot dress in Montreal, red tights and gym-shoes. She looks so pretty here! I just want to say that Dolores is still the same is she always was! She like to surprise people, her fans. Dark colors are not for Dolores, she is so bright, and her wear should be bright too.

Posted in Dolores News |


Source: www.ticketpro.ca
Author: BERNARD PERUSSE, The Gazette
Published: July 06, 2007

After years spent feeling like a commodity instead of a human, ex-Cranberries singer Dolores O’Riordan is enjoying her life

When you take four years to record an album, people will think you’re either lazy or Paul Simon. But the wait for Dolores O’Riordan’s new disc, Are You Listening? - her first since the demise of the Cranberries - had nothing to do with lethargy or obsessive perfectionism.

“I wanted to take time out to enjoy my life and not be rushing around in the rat race, which I felt I had been in the Cranberries,” she explained during a recent telephone interview. While the group was together, she said, time seemed to be going too quickly. “Each time I’d have a baby, I’d go back on tour when the baby was (about) 5 months old,” she said. “This time, it was nice not to be in a contract and not feel like you had to be an entertainer. For once in my life, that was my feeling - just to feel like a human spirit.”

For O’Riordan, the leisurely pace was a long time coming. She was only 23 when the Cranberries broke through commercially in 1994 with their second album, the multi-platinum seller No Need to Argue. The Irish group’s hard-edged pop sound, largely defined by O’Riordan’s go-for-the-jugular vocal attack, brought arena-rock success. For a while, during the mid-’90s, it seemed as if songs like Linger, Zombie and Salvation were part of the zeitgeist.

Fame came at too high a price for O’Riordan. “There’s not really much I remember (about those years), except working all the time, and a lot of suitcases being packed and unpacked, singing 24/7 and seeing millions of hotels. It was just a big fog, really,” she said. “If you’re very big, there’s a lot of demand, and you’re wanted in 50 places at once. There’s massive pressure on you. It’s inevitable that you’re going to get burned out when you’re young.”

The singer began to fight depression. “I was a workaholic and I was driven too hard by the industry,” she said. “Because I had no life, I got depressed. I was really thin, and I had a skinhead - and I didn’t look happy.”

The Cranberries followed up their breakthrough album with To the Faithful Departed (1996). By the time O’Riordan left and the group officially broke up in 2004, they had released five studio albums.

While hope springs eternal for some diehard fans, O’Riordan said the Cranberries are finished. “We could do a reunion tour in 15 years’ time or something,” she said. “We did what we’d set out to do.”

O’Riordan, who married Don Burton, Duran Duran’s former tour manager, in 1994, said her children - stepson Donny, 16; Taylor, 10; Molly, 6; and Dakota, 2 - have provided a durable anchor.

“When you’re a kid and you have nothing and you go out there and you’re famous and everybody wants to kiss your bum-bum morning, noon and night, and nobody’s going to be honest with you, and you’re surrounded by yes-people who just want you to work 24/7, eventually it’s going to wreck you. There’s no reality there,” O’Riordan said. “Once I got away from that mentality and started my family, it was that real love that you don’t find when you’re a huge commodity.”

That emotional connection informs much of the material on Are You Listening?, she acknowledged - but the idea that domestic joy is a deterrent to art is a cliche, she said.

She’s glad she had children at a young age, she said. “I’m 35 now. There’s a sense of reality you get from children that you don’t get from being famous.”

Her close bond with her mother is echoed in the kind of relationship she fosters with her own kids, she said. “I think the mother-daughter bond is a very particular one. Your mother lived her life and she wants you to fulfill all your dreams and maybe the ones she didn’t fulfill. I feel that with my own kids. When they accomplish something, I see it as my own accomplishment.”

Some of the youngsters may join O’Riordan on parts of her current tour, which began in May. “We’re having great fun,” she said of her new backing musicians. “Working with new people, it’s totally like being in a new group. We’re having a good laugh.”

Dolores O’Riordan performs at Metropolis, 59 Ste. Catherine St. E., tonight at 8:30. Tickets cost $42.50. For more details, call 514-908-9090 or go to www.ticketpro.ca.

Posted in Stuff, Articles |


What Toronto restaurant do you like to eat at before a show?

DOLORES: I never eat before a show, but I love going to La Castille Steak House & Tavern (2179 Dundas East, Mississauga).

What club do you hit when you want to party after the gig?

DOLORES: I don’t go to clubs. Ever.

What do you love most about Toronto?

DOLORES: The people, clean city, waterfront.

What do you hate about the city?

DOLORES: Being stuck on the 401.

Hotel of choice and why?

DOLORES: Four Seasons wherever I go, because you can’t go wrong.

Most memorable border-crossing experience heading to Toronto?

DOLORES: Twice rejected in the early ‘Berries days because we had the wrong visas.

What was the wildest time you’ve ever had in Toronto?

DOLORES: Too many to count. We had our daughter’s christening on a 100-foot yacht cruising around the harbour - great view from the water.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Author: Sarah Rodman, Globe Staff
Published: July 6, 2007

When touring took its toll, she left the Cranberries for a new life

Dolores O’Riordan doesn’t have much in common musically with Britney Spears, but the former Cranberries vocalist is sympathetic to the struggles of today’s pop starlets.

“They’re only kids, and they have a lot of pressure to deal with,” says O’Riordan, on the phone from a Sicily tour stop, where she is promoting her first solo album, “Are You Listening?” “They have a lot of people who are jealous of them, who love them and who think they own them, so you do feel a bit of sympathy because I don’t think anyone understands what it’s like unless they go through it.”

O’Riordan went through it.

The singer from Limerick joined the Cranberries at age 18. The Irish quartet’s blend of the ethereal and the muscular, on hit songs such as “Dreams,” “Linger,” and “Zombie,” made them a success in the early ’90s, a sweet but sharp alternative to the era’s twin poles of grunge and teen pop.

Over the course of 13 years and five releases, the group sold upward of 40 million records. But running the hamster wheel of touring and recording took its toll on O’Riordan, as she obsessed over pleasing fans and record label execs.

“I had my little boy 10 years ago. I nursed him for three months and the band were looking at me like ‘When are we going back to work? We’ve got to deliver another album here,’ ” O’Riordan, 35, recalls in a rapid-fire patter marked by a lilting brogue. “So I left the baby when he was 12 weeks and went back to the Cranberries and back out on the road and back hammering in the studio. Then I stopped again when I was about four months pregnant with my second child, and I went home, popped her [out], nursed her for three months, back to rehearsal, back on the road. You know, no real life, just really going through routines and feeling a certain sense of obligation because you’re in contracts and you have the band waiting for you.”

O’Riordan’s weight plummeted alarmingly, and she had to cancel shows due to depression and exhaustion.

“I don’t think anybody can put blame on her for anything she went through,” says drummer Graham Hopkins, late of Irish rock band Therapy? and sometime member of the Frames. “[Forty] million albums sold isn’t necessarily the most sane of things to happen to anybody. And I think she’s come out of it so triumphantly.”

That triumph had its casualties, however. When the Cranberries released their greatest hits album in 2002, O’Riordan put on the brakes. “I said to the boys, I can’t turn the clock back, my children are going to be small only for a while, I want to stop this. I want you to go ahead with your lives, don’t wait for me. I don’t know what I’m doing, but I’m certainly not going on the road and not back into the band, not now. I don’t want to be the sad old rock star who’s had too long away from the kids.”

Instead she spent time with her husband, former tour manager Don Burton , and had another child. The family moved to Toronto to be near Burton’s ailing mother, and O’Riordan wrote songs when the mood struck her between checking homework assignments and cooking dinner.

“It was great to just suddenly find myself sitting around looking up at the sky, counting the stars, wondering ‘Will I ever go back? I don’t know. But right now I’m enjoying this moment.’ It was a beautiful four years.”

It was also a fruitful four years, as “Are You Listening?,” recorded in bits and pieces during that interval, demonstrates.

Forsaking the harder musical and political edges that had marked the Cranberries later — and less successful — albums in favor of odes to O’Riordan’s family, “Listening” is meditative and optimistic. It features more of O’Riordan’s first instrument, piano, and showcases different sides of her multifaceted voice, from dusky croon to sculpted howl to ecstatic yodel.

Hopkins, who played on the album and anchors O’Riordan’s new band, which comes to Avalon on Monday, was surprised by some of the turns O’Riordan took during recording. “I think it would’ve been easier for her to go on the same path, but she’s gone somewhere different, and I think that’s probably because she’s experienced so much of life’s pains.”

First single “Ordinary Day” is a gentle prayer for 2-year-old daughter Dakota. Icy piano rocker “Black Widow” is a choir-filled outpouring of emotion in response to the illness and death of her mother-in-law.

But as the up-tempo “Loser” proves — with its snappy backbeat and tuneful sneer — O’Riordan has lost neither her gift for penning a melody that whistles around in your head after one listen or the sass that fueled the band’s more aggressive side.

“It’s a fresh sound, but it’s something that people can recognize at the same time,” says Ron Bowen, program director and morning drive-time host of WXRV (92.5 The River).

“I think a lot of people who liked the early Cranberries material are linking with this record because in a way we’re on the same page in life,” says O’Riordan of fans who have started families and begun to recognize their parents’ mortality.

She’s also grateful for those fans who aren’t on quite the same page, at least chronologically, including Avril Lavigne and Natasha Bedingfield , who have cited her as an influence. “It’s very flattering, but it does make me feel like ‘How many more lines have I around my eyes?’ ” says O’Riordan with a laugh. Her crow’s feet also spring to mind when kids approach her at shows and say, ” ‘I was 6 when my mom used to play your music,’ and I’m thinking “[expletive]!’ The penny dropped.”

Because there was no animosity in the band’s split — the other three members have begun separate music projects — O’Riordan says the door isn’t closed on a reunion. “But,” she says, “we’d want to be apart for 20 years or something, you know? And it would have to work. Like, the Police are totally selling out, they’re massive. So if you’re that hot it’s great, but then if you’re not it doesn’t work. Maybe one day [fans will say] ‘Hey man, [the Cranberries] were cool, let’s go!’ Or it might be like, ‘Who?’”

Posted in Stuff, Articles |


Autor: Christopher John Treacy
Published: July 6, 2007

After selling more than 40 million albums worldwide with the Cranberries, Dolores O’Riordan was tired of the rock star grind.

You could almost hear the passion fading on the Irish quartet’s ho-hum final disc, 2001’s “Wake Up and Smell the Coffee.” Finally, after the Cranberries’ 2003 tour, O’Riordan left the band that had made her a star. At the time, the media portrayed her departure as the product of a nervous breakdown, but her reasoning seems perfectly sound in hindsight.

“It was clearly the end of the road,” O’Riordan said from Los Angeles shortly before embarking on the solo tour that brings her to Avalon on Monday. “We started recording another disc, but nothing felt inspired. We’d lost any sense of creative excitement.

Plus,” she continued, “I needed time to care for my mother-in-law, who was very ill. I’d come to a massive intersection and I eliminated the Cranberries as an option since it no longer seemed to be going anywhere. In retrospect, it seems if I hadn’t taken the time off, I probably wouldn’t ever have returned to music.”

It took four years for the now-35-year-old siren to feel her creative itch return, resulting in her diverse new solo debut, “Are You Listening?”

But for O’Riordan, family had to come first.
“I went up to Canada,” she said, referring to her Ontario property. “I had to completely step away. No contracts, no obligations. I wanted to be surrounded purely by love, so I became a full-time mother.

“Suddenly, deciding what to give my kids for dinner became important. I wanted to prove to myself that I could run my own household and actually cope without all the usual assistance that rock stars require.”

Prove it she did. Not only did she care for her children, Taylor, 9, and Molly, 6, she and her husband, former Duran Duran tour manager Don Burton, found time for a third: Dakota, who was born in April 2005.

O’Riordan also did some volunteer elementary school teaching and made good on a promise to herself to finally obtain a driver’s license.

It was partly thanks to a nudge from funnyman Adam Sandler that she found her way back to music. A phone call asking her to do a cameo in his film “Click” got the ball rolling.

“The call about the film thrust me back into the big bad world,” she said. “I spent 10 days in L.A. enjoying a bit of the celebrity treatment and I thought, ‘Gee, this isn’t so bad, now, is it?’ I had to stop breast-feeding Dakota and switch to the pump so I could make the trip, which was really difficult, but I ended up having a blast. And I also had four years of experience and inspiration to bring to that table for a new project.”

O’Riordan must have known she’d eventually record again: “Are You Listening?” was whittled down to 12 tracks from the 30 new songs she’d amassed. Using a variety of producers and musicians gives the CD a fresh feel, along with vindication of her decision to walk away from the Cranberries. Despite some rumors, she’s not planning a reunion.

“I wouldn’t consider working with a full-time band again,” she said. “No, this is better. As an artist beholden only to myself I can move freely between this life and my other identities as wife and mother. That way, neither ever really gets dull. And I know I’m blessed to be able to have both.”

Dolores O’Riordan, at Avalon, Monday at 8 p.m. Tickets: $30; 617-931-2000.

Posted in Stuff, Articles |


After years when her triumphs were in danger of being masked by her tribulations, DOLORES O’RIORDAN is back in defiantly upbeat form. She talks to STUART CLARK about confidence, critics, Calvin Klein and her “confirmation-size breasts”!

YOU THINK I’m going to talk to you now, you bastard? You were supposed to be here at 12 o’clock. TWELVE-O-FUCKING-CLOCK! Now sod off or I’ll set the dogs on you!”

Dolores O’Riordan says none of these things as myself and H.P. sharpshooter Mick Quinn arrive 45 minutes late for our twosome with the Cranberries frontperson. The one thing they neglect to teach you at journalism college is how to overtake tractors ­ the Clarkmobile’s arrival in Kilmallock was delayed by a particularly slothful Massey Ferguson.

Obviously confusing Hot Press with Hello!, Dolores has invited us in to her beautiful County Limerick home, a palatial abode which befits her status as one of Ireland’s richest women. There’s no sign of her full-time security team, although it’s possible that the three old fellas tending her herbaceous border have Special Services training.

Not being a fan of the new rock Puritanism ­ I’m talking about you, Thom Yorke ­ I’m pleased to report that chez O’Riordan is a shrine to loadsamoney self-indulgence. After pausing to admire the stained-glass window, which has the lyrics to ‘Zombie’ inscribed on it, we’re ushered into the gaff’s very own Jungle Room.

I’m not sure what I’m most impressed with ­ the full-size Wild West bar or the saddle-stools lined-up in front of it. To the right of that are a giant sofa, a snoozing bearskin and the biggest fuck off telly you’ve ever seen.

As for Dolly herself, there’s no sign of the edginess which a few years ago made interviewing her such a minefield. Having ditched the peroxide in favour of a more natural reddy-brown do, she doesn’t look a whole lot different to the girl I first met a decade ago in a Shannonside hostelry of ill-repute. Except for her t-shirt, that is. The teenage O’Riordan would never have worn a top with the legend “psychobitch” emblazoned across it.

Taking care of bartending duties is her Canadian husband, Don. Looking slightly offended when we decline a snorter of the bourbon he’s imported from back home, he does the honours with the Diet Cokes and talks enthusiastically about the Japanese steak house that him and the missus are opening in D4. Further evidence of the O’ Riordan-Burtons’ penchant for good grub is provided by the Italian pizza oven plonked in the yard.

Asked later if Don is the Cranberries’ Yoko Ono, drummer Fergal Lawlor laughs so hard he almost falls off his saddle. “It might seem like that from the outside but, nah, he’s never got in the way of our relationship,” Lawlor says, once he’s regained his composure. “In fact, he’s really helped with the business side of things.”

Which, contrary to what you might have read elsewhere, is booming. Despite a relatively poor showing in the States, the band’s current album, Bury The Hatchet, has just sold its five millionth copy. Gigs in Europe and South America are still deemed intimate if there’s less than 20,000 people there, and it didn’t take long for Calvin Klein to come knocking when he needed an instantly recognisable face for his ad campaign.

STUART CLARK: Did you enjoy your first taste of being a fashion model?

Dolores O’Riordan: I got loads of free jeans and some cash as well, so it was great. If it had been for something more girlie I’d probably have said “no”, but that denim and black eye look is what I’m into myself. The fact that Moby and Macy Gray were the other people doing it shows that, in the States anyway, we’re still thought of as being “alternative”. To be honest, I wouldn’t have got the gig if they were looking for a mainstream babe. I haven’t got the legs or the boobs.

Were there big bucks involved?

I’d say it’s pretty big for models, but most of the artists get about ?20,000 to do it.

After that, I was expecting you to be the first to volunteer for catwalk duties at the Point.

(laughs) I’d probably have done a Naomi Campbell and fallen on my arse! I know Ann and Ally (Hewson) quite well as girls, and they persuaded me to come along and present one of the designer awards. I don’t usually go to stuff like that in this country, but why not? The fashion world’s the same as the rock ‘n’ roll world. You’ve got your really sound down-to-earth people and the pretentious assholes who you try to avoid.
I went back to The Clarence afterwards, which was great ‘cos I was able to gawp at all the really big stars. I stayed there for about an hour and then, realising I was getting obliviously drunk, slipped out. My fear in those situations is that I’m going to end up dancing on a table and giving somebody a headbutt.

Didn’t you do something along those lines once in Limerick?

That was a hormonal thing. I’d just stopped breast-feeding, so I was in a weird kind of a mood and not able to hold my alcohol. I don’t know if you’re aware of this, but after having a baby, women go through a period when they feel really insecure. You go out for the first time, there’s this gut of leather hanging off you, and you don’t take too kindly to other women giving your man the eye. There was a bit of a scene, but nothing serious.

Do you recognise yourself from the descriptions of you in the paper?

Five or six years ago, I was way too serious. Somebody would ask a question that was, maybe, a bit too personal, and rather than laughing it off, I let it get to me. Now, I’ll either answer it straight, make a joke out of it and change the subject, or tell you ever so politely to fuck off! I’m not afraid to let my sense of humour come out or, if needs be, be assertive.

What’s the daftest thing that you’ve read about yourself?

I don’t know, really. Sometimes people say “she’s a bitch to work with”, which I can be when it comes to being on stage. It may be somebody else’s fault, but I’m the one who’s left looking like a plonker in front of thousands of people. All of my crew know that I’m really, really sound as a person, but if my guitar’s out of tune or the monitor’s not working, I’m going to blow a gasket. That’s just because I’m meticulous about my job. I don’t think I’d have gotten this far in life without being that way.

Being branded a bitch is one thing, but didn’t you have to take an injunction against a foreign journalist who was dishing some serious dirt?

We went to court and it was proven that the story was made up. When that happened, the paparazzi guy who’d supplied it started to blackmail (us), so we had to get a lawyer on him.

There was also a German you had to take legal action against.

The guy on the Internet? I wouldn’t go into that ‘cos he was arrested and everything. I don’t know how psychologically balanced or unbalanced he was.

I imagine, with a young son, that you’re very concerned about security.

Yeah, I am. I mean, God, look out there at all those cameras and infra-red lights. We have full-time security which is essential when you’re living this far out in the country. I’ve had people come up to the front gate and sleep outside, which isn’t what you want. They’ll ring the buzzer and I’ll go, “Sorry, she’s in Indonesia”. Not that I’m a prisoner, though. If it ever got to the stage where I couldn’t go out and do what I wanted, I’d knock it on the head. Band over.

Have you been following the Angela’s Ashes debate?

I didn’t read it myself, but from what Ferg (Lawlor) was telling me, it sounds pretty accurate. God, there were seven kids in my family, and four of us in one bed for a long time. We used to have a big saucepan of potatoes ­ 30 or 40 of ‘em ­ on the range and eat pig’s head, tails and trotters. When you’re hungry and a kid, that’s grand.

I know as well that there was a lot of drinking and stuff. Fathers went out and drank because there was no money and they needed a release and dah, di, dah. I mean, how can people say that the author’s lying when they haven’t been through his experience?

Everybody has demons in their closets, but it’s from these demons that we learn and become better people. There was certainly poverty around in Limerick, but at the same time I had a lot of spirituality which made up for it.

What Do you still consider yourself to be a spiritual person?

I could if I had to be, but I’ve got a lot of toys now! I love boats and I love motorbikes. The biker culture ­ like rock ‘n’ roll ­ is something that’s misunderstood. Harleys, which are my dream bike, are a bit too heavy for me, so I normally stick to four-wheelers.

It doesn’t sound like you’ve got much in common with Meg Matthews.

A new Gucci bag? Nah, get me some more machines! I wouldn’t really be into clothes and make-up, except for when we’re going on tour and I can’t just throw on a pair of jeans. Calvin Klein jeans, that is!

Is the upcoming Dublin show a chance to ever so regally wave two fingers at your critics?

There’s no agenda apart from wanting to play the best gig possible. It’s not going to stick out in my head and be different to Mexico or Malaysia. I’ll pick out my clothes, have my massage, do my yoga, meditate and then go out there and kick ass. I’ve proved anything I’ve needed to by selling 22 million albums. I’m 28 years of age ­ I’ve got a beautiful husband and a beautiful child. It’s natural to want to be liked, but if somebody thinks that I’m shit, I’m not going to loose any sleep over it.

It has got pretty personal, though.

There have been a few times when I’ve had to remind myself that I’m not a murderer or, worse still, a politician. You don’t know these people, yet there they are saying they hate you. If you’re strong ­ like I feel now ­ it’s water off a duck’s back. If you’re in any way vulnerable, though, watch out.

You said the last time we met that you’d suffered something akin to a breakdown. Looking back now, can you understand what brought it about?

I think what happens is that through a combination of working too hard, and constantly being in the public eye, you start becoming paranoid. You can’t see the good things because of all the bad things that are in the way, which is a textbook definition of depression. Everything’s sad and bad, which of course comes across in your interviews. If I’d read me five or six years ago, I’d have thought I was a right miserable cow! Having taken the prolonged career break that we did, I realised that there are far more nice people than there are bad asses. It’s difficult to explain without sounding all cliched, but it really is a case of coming out of the tunnel and being dazzled by the light.

Just how fucked-up were you?

I’d accomplished all these record sales which, yeah, made me feel incredibly proud, but I didn’t have a home or a car or anything I could really call my own. I was afraid to come back to Ireland. I hadn’t come back for years, and when I did I’d be freaked out and hiding under a hat. Basically, I was scared of my crap.
Ireland is a small country, which when the Cranberries started was still very Catholic and judgmental. I feel much more comfortable now that the Celtic Tiger’s kicked in and things have become more liberal. Eight years ago it was, “Oh my God, she said that!”, whereas now no-one gives a damn. Being in a business where drug-taking is almost mandatory, did you ever turn to chemicals for solace?
No, I just never wanted to be that out of control. I’ve seen my friends doing mushrooms and they’d be like, “God, your head’s gone all furry!” It seems a lot of fun, but with my stomach I’d probably puke. In America, especially, it’s harder not to take drugs. The more I was encouraged to try ‘em, the more I thought, “No, I’m not going to give in to peer pressure.” If I’d wanted to take drugs I would have, but I didn’t.

Would you fire a crew member if you knew they were popping pills?

No. They can do what they like as long as they function on stage.

How’s your new ‘month on, month off’ regime working out?

Brilliant. We’re flying to Puerto Rico tomorrow to do a show, and I’m really looking forward to it ‘cos I know that, in a few weeks time, I’ll be back home with my friends and family again. The gigs are better because we’re not on such a treadmill and permanently knackered.

Is rock ‘n’ roll life enough for you, or do you have ambitions outside of music?

Don’t laugh, but I’m totally into trees. We’re going to set about eight acres ‘cos I think everyone should give what they can back to the environment. We’re also opening a Benehana here ­ that’s a Japanese restaurant where the chef cooks your food in front of you. We’ve just got the building in Dublin, so that should be open next year. It’s something that Don, myself and the lads are doing together ­ partly for a giggle and partly as an investment.

After your night of debauchery in The Clarence, have you thought about opening your own hotel?

Actually, I have. Not here but in somewhere like the South of France. The other thing I’m big into is new beauty treatments and therapies for women. There’s a huge need nowadays for stress relief, so I’d love to open a place which would do everything from massage and reflexology to yoga and natural organic highs.

I guess, being into the natural side of things, you’d never consider getting a boob job.

Are you saying that my tits are small?

(acutely embarrassed) What I meant is that you’d be opposed to cosmetic surgery.

I think I speak for all women who have small breasts when I say that we can be beautiful too, without getting a big pair of soccer balls hanging off us. Certain men find us attractive. I’m not insecure about the fact that I’ve confirmation-size breasts. It’s part of me, and I’d feel very strange with a pair of soccer balls. Having answered that, I insist you ask the lads if they’ve considered getting their penises enlarged.

I’ll make a note of it. Before you have me escorted off the premises, a few quick questions.
Do you still get trolleyed from time to time?

Yes. Last Friday I did an all-nighter. I began consuming alcohol at approximately eight o’clock and was still standing ­ well, slouching ­ at 9 a.m. on Saturday morning. I don’t think going on a bender once in a while does you any harm. Except for the hangover, that is. They definitely get worse as you get older.

The best film you’ve seen recently?

The General’s Daughter.

Where did you usher in the new millennium?

At home. We fired the pizza oven up, opened a few bottles of Cristel and had a party.

Were champagne corks popped when you heard that Westlife had scored their fifth number one?

No.

Would you regard them as being even more insidious than Boyzone?

Yes.

Do you still think that The Corrs are evil personified?

I’ve nothing against them, but to me their music’s boring. It’s kind of squeaky clean. There’s not a hair out of place, the lipliner’s perfect and they’ve always got high-heels on to make them look longer and thinner. They’re very pretty girls and I totally appreciate that other people love them. Guys especially. I was at the party in Dublin and it was like (does very convincing canine impersonation) puppies panting all around them.

When are you going solo?

(laughs) Wasn’t I supposed to have done that five years ago? Nah, no plans whatsoever.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Magazine: Top Music
Year:
2001
Author:
Antonio Rojas

Translated from Spanish by Magda

I have always consider Dolores O’Riordan one of the most spectacular and overwhelming women in European music. Spectacular, not for an outstanding beauty, although she is incredibly attractive, but for her strength and intense personality that hooks you up like a fish when you speak to her or you see her on stage, jumping like she always does. Dolores has been lucky in life, and the other members in The Cranberries have contributed to that luck, a band with out fissures, that now introduces their new album, Wake Up And Smell The Coffee (W.U.A.S.T.C), that was recorded when Dolores was very much pregnant with her second baby.

Top music interviewed Dolores O’Riordan, lead the singer of the Irish group The Cranberries, Don’t miss out on her thoughts on her new album W.U.A.S.T.C. be cause there are not wasted.

We love the first single who did it come up?

It had been a long time since I had written a song so optimistic and positive, with a catchy melody and not a negative element in it. In certain way it reminds me of , a song that’s 10 years old, but it feels different at the same time. It’s like it includes a deeper experience, like the sounds are more sophisticated and develop. How ever above all, it is a pretty happy and optimistic song. It was about time we release something like this.

What can you tell us about the video?

We choose a kid called Keir McFarland to work with him. When I saw a film he made, I really liked it, and it was impressive. I had seen around 10 or 11 videos that other producers, every one very different from the other.
But in Keir’s case what got to me was the way on which he approached things, I don’t know, may be because his style was pretty abstracted. What appeared on those images was just the contrary of what you expected to find in every moment, never choosing the more obvious option or the most predictable of things. His work was filled with irony, and I really liked his conceptual side.

Why did you go back to work with Steven?

In our third album, we decided to work with Bruse Fairburn, but unfortunately he died. Later we worked with Ben Fenner on the fourth album. Suddenly we all thought . We’ve been together 10 or 11 years as a group, so we thought it would not be bad to recuperate the way we worked at the beginning, to see how things develop now that we have change so much. We are older, and regardless of our age, I think we are also a little more mature. Steve has change a lot too, now he is more experience, same with us. That is why it is been nice to get together again.

Everything points to going back to your routs…

The truth is I don’t believe it is so, because a lot of the songs on this album would have been impossible 11 years ago. Before I would have found very complicated to sing this way, I think I would not have achieved it with out the confidence, the maturity and the wrinkles I have now. On our first album I felt like a teenager: Insecure, and wanting to sing songs about broken hearts and broken relationships. I think this are more mature and with more content themes.
In fact, I believe that the sound and the song lyrics show maturity, it is like everything is different. The only thing that has not change is Steven’s presence and the 4 band members.

Has it been something special in your habitual song creating process?

There is one new thing for us, because, we had never been confronted to something like this before. It is about the last song on the album . I remember Steven telling me: < Hey Dolores, we are recording Chocolate Brown tomorrow> and I said: (normally on Fridays we would record the drums, the bass, or any other instrument on Friday), and he said Yes. So I said to him< so I can go out tonight and have some drinks, and get drunk, be cause I am not singing tomorrow>

And you did?

Yes (laughs), I did, and of course on Friday I had a huge hangover, but in great shape to play. I remember Steven looking at me and he said< Well are you ready? Let’s record this song directly>. I remember and responded: . And Steven told me . He got me into the recording studio, were everybody was gather around an enormous and old microphone, that look a lot like one the beatles would use to record their albums. Steven wanted me to be closer to the microphone, while Mike played the bass also besides to the microphone, and the same with the drums. How ever the drum kit did not have a microphone connected and Mike had only his amplifier, so the microphone picked up the sound from the amplifier, With Noel the same happened.

And what was the result?

Well we played that song in that manner, directly, without any other element, and truly it came out very good. We sang it 5 or 6 times. I was convinced that after having spent the whole night drinking I would not be able to sing and Steven would not stop telling me . So I closed my eyes, and I put my self to doing the best I could. In the end the song sounded refreshing and it is beautiful, different from all the songs that lately are charged with excessive and exaggerated production, it seams that is what fashion for a lot of the groups is. There are a lot of female singers that can’t sing. They are very attractive, have huge boobs and everything you like, but they can not sing and try to compensate with over producing. Contrary to all of that I find to be one of those authentic songs, one you can really sing well, because it is fill with good music and real emotions. It is not like one of those prefabricated fake songs. When you listen to it, you feel like a breeze of fresh air. I like it a lot.

Being pregnant, was it complicated for recording a whole album?

Truth is that the recording of this album was not difficult at all. It was not the first time that I found my self recording or being pregnant, and I found it very interesting. Besides, the fact that I was working with Steven Streip, whom we knew so well, has been a wonderful experience. I felt so comfortable, that I felt like I was not working, but something I really liked.

Has success changed you in any way?

Just for the fact that you join a group, manage to enjoy great success and became famous, it does not mean you have to stay away from family or friends, from the people you love. You do not have to move to a world of fame and glamour. The fact that we live in the same little city where you have spent your whole life in, it’s not bad at all. For us it has always been very important the fact of being focus in whom we really are, being in contact with the persons we like, with out letting success submerge us in a world we do not care for.

What is your current situation as a woman?

Before, I cared a lot for silly things, for example, if people would like me. I though on how I would look physically, how my legs looked, If my hair look good. I lost a lot of time and money, reading those stupid feminine fashion magazines, and became as sad and insecure person to the eyes of others. This is what happens to a lot of women when they spend their life thinking: . The society pressures you to be thin, to be in shape, to show yourself sexy, to wear a certain kind of cloths… Women suffer pressure from everywhere.

What kind of relationship do you have with your fans?

Well, sometimes, when I get to the studio, what I do is read the letters our fans send from all over the world. Our web page’s administrator puts them according to where they came from. For example, he gives us all the fan letters from Asia, and in another lot all the letters from Argentina, and so on. Sometimes I do write back. I think it is pretty important that our fans receive a response from us, from time to time.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Stars is out: The compilation with all the singles of The Cranberries to celebrate the 10 years career of the band. But it’s not just a Best of; it’s also, according to the words of an enigmatic Dolores, the end of an era.

One meter and sixty centimeters tall, enclosed in her totally black dress and apparent frailty, Dolores gladly accepted to spend part of a grey Milan afternoon talking to us about the first 10 years of the Cranberries. Allusive but at the same time also elusive, Dolores let us understand that the future, somehow or other, will be more interesting than the past.

The Cranberries celebrate the first 10 years of their career. How has been this adventure?

If I had to draw a diagram, (on the next page) the start of this adventure was not in 1992 but in 1990, 12 years ago! We had a first peak in 1992-93, when our first album went out; than we disappeared in 1996, the year of To the Faithful Departed; After that the ascent restarted: since 1996 I spent much time searching my own dimension and spirituality; And finally now I’m very well and at peace with myself.

What allowed you to reach this higher level of spirituality?

The experiences I had, in particular the negative ones. When you are near the limit and all everything’s close to breaking off, and you succeed in getting out of this situation, you feel stronger than ever. The difference between now and before is that nowadays I don’t feel under pressure and I don’t care about the number of copies we sell. When our first album went out, Everybody Else is Doing it So Why Can’t We?, we felt a lot of pressure, we were immature teenagers; Now we’ve grown up and we are able to do our best when we write songs.

But many people say your first album is also the best!

This is what people think; now we’re talking about what I think!

In this 10 years have you ever seriously risked splitting up?

Yes, In 1996 we didn’t just risk, we really split up even there was no official communication: we didn’t meet each other for approximately 1 year and we had no plans to come back.

And what let you change your ideas?

Noel sent me a tape with some songs he had written when I was in Canada, and they were beautiful! So one night, in the middle of a drink, I phoned him and I told that I missed him and that he was an extraordinary person! So we decided to meet and try the new songs.

In Stars there are two new songs: one is New New York, clearly in regard to September 11. Don’t you think you are just one of the people that wrote and sang about it?

I don’t care about what the others do. I just do what I like and what is going throuth my mind.

Have you ever thought to write a song called “New Kabul“?

No, and I think I’m not going to do it now; I was in New York when I wrote that song and I wrote just the one thing that made sense for me.

Are you worried about the possibility of a War in Iraq?

Yes of course. I think that the situation could just get worse not better: bombs are never the best way to achive something good. Instead they are just used to start something wicked! History says this, not myself.

Coming back to the GH, do you think it could synthesize the essence of the Cranberries?

It’s just a collection of our singles. It’s a good CD to give as a gift to someone and, at the same time, let him know The Cranberries. There are all our most popular songs.

Do you think there’re still people that don’t know the Cranberries?

There’re a lot! Maybe they sing the refrain of Linger or know other songs, but they often don’t know that it’s played by the Cranberries and they have never seen our faces. I often go to shops or malls and no one recognizes me. A few days ago some people asked me for some information. They thought I was a shop assistant!!!

Where did you take the cover picture? It looks like a runway of an airport.

It’s a road in Las Vegas. We were there for some shows and we liked the place very much. So we called Andy Earl, our photographer, and he found this road. It seems that part is just the end of the road and behind it there’s nothing.

On the back of the cover the band walks away straight toward the horizon line. Is there a metaphor?

Yes. We’re arrived at the end of an era and no one knows what there is beyond the horizon.

What will happen?

The world has arrived at the end of an era and ironically, this is linked to the destiny of the Cranberries. I can say that there’s some expectation in the air.

Are you thinking of starting a solo career?

I’m not sure. I would like to do many things that I couldn’t do in the last 10 years. Everytime I tried to take a break, I had a baby or I got a nervous breakdown. That’s 2 babies and a nervous breakdown!!

Will you try something different from the Cranberries?

I am attracted to ethnic music and ethnic instruments, from flutes to bongos, and every type of steel drum; I don’t like the didgeridoo, I tried to play it but I’m a total disaster; I don’t Indian music, the kind that you hear in restaurants, there’s too much stuff inside. I like the music with many pauses just like African music.

Will you act, maybe in a musical?

Maybe I will act, but certainly not in a musical! I hate them. When I was 12, at school, I was asked to do an audition for the part of Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz, because at that time I already had a good voice; Disgusting! I arrived in a hall with all the teachers looking at me, and all I could do was laugh, laugh and laugh. At that time I already had my strong character; In the classroom I made a lot of jokes and I made a real mess. I was a leader and I was too much of a “bully” to act the part of that idiot Dorothy. Obviously I didn’t get the part! They let me do a peasant, I had to sing offstage and walk across the stage pushing a cart.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Dolores, vocalist of the Cranberries, is still working on her solo career, but she says she misses her band.

MEXICO CITY, Mexico, Dec. 7, 2005.- One of the guest artists for the Christmas concert that had place last week in the Vatican was the Irish vocalist of the Cranberries, who commented to the media her future plans, where she does not rule out a return to the stages, but not for the moment.

Yes, Dolores O’Riordan, the vocalist of The Cranberries, still works on her solo career; nevertheless, she says she misses the moments she shared with the band and does not reject the idea of getting back together and writing songs the way they did in the past, she commented to the press that was present at the Christmas Concert at the Vatican.

Dolores wants to dedicate more time to her solo career and says that her first record will be on the stores before June 2006. She assures that the fact of the other members of the band working solo does not mean they cannot reunite, but she sees it as an expression to open up new roads.

“In this moment everyone wants to take new musical directions and different ways of expressing ourselves. I am personally against the idea of not playing together as a band in the future, but for now, we have to acknowledge that it’s not the time”, she said to the Italian media.

In the past concert, Dolores interpreted some themes like: “Linger” and “Adeste Fideles”.

Posted in Stuff, Articles |


Source: InsideOnline
Year: march, 2007
Author: Gord McLaughlin.

Summon up a mental image of Dolores O’Riordan and chances are you’re seeing red. She sported various shades if scarlet when she was lead singer of The Cranberries”, the Irish alt-rock band that sold more then 36million albums before going on hiatus four years ago. She once even shaved her head, a la Sinead O’Connor. But with the release of her first solo CD, Are You Listening?, Dolores reveals that neither her hair not her music remains the colour of cranberries.

First the hair. “It’s au naturel, mon cheri”, laughs O’Riordan during a telephone interview. “Long black hair like when I was a little girl, really. It’s so natural and easy and sensible.” The plain-speaking Irish woman recoils when asked fro post-baldness grooming tips for Britney Spears. “I just think it’s none of my business. I think if anything she needs privacy.”

O’Riordan can relate. When The Cranberries wound down, she says she left a duge urge to disappear o’ the face of the Earth. It helped to have a Canadian husband, Don Burton (the tour manager for Duran Duran), whom she wed in 1994. Eir riral Ontario home o’ered the seclusion she needed to make a creative turn. “Going out into the snow and the forest, you’re kind of really at the ends of the Earth. I’ve seen bears so many times in the last few years.

O’Riordan says cutting herself o’ from public life was vital to writing fresh songs. “You have to feel you’re not marketing yourself in any way.” Departing from a rock format brought” a huge amount of freedom. You’re not sitting in a room with bass, guitar and drums. I would begin on piano. It’s a completely different form to be writing in. I have access to a lot more chords. I could create nice owing melody lines that are hooky, that kind of work their way in.”

! e piano presence definitely marks a departure for O’Riordan, particularly in cuts like “When We Were Young”. Staccato keystrokes jab like a sewing machine against her velvet voice in the stark plaintive opening: “Funny how things just tasted better when we were young.” Yet the same song moves in and out of a relentless guitar-driven rock aria. O’Riordan’s lyrics are as direct and evo-cative as ever, suggesting that life is both the greatest blessing and a hell of trial.

It was in the couple’s Irish home that O’Riordan worked out the alternately haunting and harrowing piano lines on the song “Black Widow”, a reaction to her mother-in-law’s death from cancer. “I’d never really encountered people going through it before,” says O’Riordan, who has likened the disease to a beast attacking from within. “When you see what it does to human beings, you realize that it’s actually evil.” ! ere’s a dunnier inspiration behind the CD’s first single. “Ordinary Day”, a lush and upbeat reflection on childhood. “I’m kind of talking to my girls and telling them what I think though my own experience,” she says. “It’s like talking to my own self. You see your girls, and it’s like seeing yourself.” O’Riordan also has a son, born in Toronto in 1997. She gures all three children have been shaped in part by mama’s music, starting in the womb.

“I remember one gig I was eight months pregnant with my second kid, and every time the bass and drums would kick in for rock songs, the baby would start kicking and dancing,” says O’Riordan, whose own musical gestation is far from ever. When she was fronting! “Cranberries, she liked to record her vocal tracks in the dark because it helped her to let loose. “I thing when I first started singing, I was quite shy,” she explains. O’Riordan was barely our of her teens when she joined the band in the early ’90’s. “Over the years I’ve become more aggressive with the singing out, more experimental with melody,” she says. “And I tend to work a lot with rhythm in my voice.” Now, at 35, O’Riordan is happy to record with the lights on, with a little urging from Youth, the groundbreaking producer (U2, The Verve) who worked on “Ordinary Day” and “Apple of My Eye”.

“He really liked to be able to see me. He likes to be able to stand up in the control room and dance a lot. If someone wants to see you and feed o’ you. I have no problem with that.”

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Souce: VH1
Published: May, 2007

Dolores O’Riordan has come a long way since her early-90s audition for the lead singer job with The Cranberry Saw Us. Her band changed its name to something more palatable (you know them as The Cranberries), launched a campaign of world domination (few have recovered from the far-reaching effects of “Linger”), and now the pint-sized vocalist has struck out on her own with Are You Listening?. O’Riordan’s unmistakable lilt swirls over a blend of folk and rock, which is made edgier by atmospheric production from Youth (U2, Paul McCartney). And though the album is the product of serious events such as death and motherhood, a recent chat with O’Riordan found her eager to share ideas on more frivolous things, like her soap opera obsession, getting tongue-tied in front of James Hetfield, and the downside of wearing glasses.

Name: Dolores Mary Eileen O’Riordan

Born: Limerick Maternity Hospital, September 6, 1971.

First memory:

I can remember sitting on the windowsill looking out. It used to rain a lot in Ireland in the 70s, and I’d sit in front of the window. It was where I’d go when I got into trouble, when I lost my glasses. I started wearing them when I was 4 or 5 years old, so I’d sit on them or break them.

Biggest thrill as a child:

I went to see the movies for the first time when I was 7. It was The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams. I thought it was fantastic — I was blown away because I’d never been to a cinema. It was so cool.

What was your nickname as a kid?

My dad used to call me Delsey Delsey. My dad likes to make up wacky names. My dad called us all pet names — he didn’t call us by our first names.

Did you sit at the back or front of the class?

I chose to sit at the back, but I was always put at the front. I liked to fool around and I wasn’t interested in what was going on as far as the teacher was concerned. I was a bit of a jester in school.

First record bought:

The Smiths, How Soon Is Now? It was a tape.

First gig attended:

I went to see the Waterboys outside Limerick when I was 17. It was brilliant — the original Waterboys when they were [at] their high point. It was fantastic to have seen them at their high peak.

First date:

I was an early beginner — I had a boyfriend when I was about 7. We lived in a housing estate that was constantly being developed, so there were these vacant metal containers sitting around the building site, and in the vacant containers, there was a long piece of rubber, so we made a swing out of it. And because it was rubber, it hurt your butt to sit on, so my boyfriend, his name was Michael from around the corner, he would sit on it and let me sit on his lap — very romantic, when you’re 7.

Last book read:

Panic by Jeff Abbott — it’s about a guy who thinks his life is one way, but it’s not. His life is nothing like what he thought it was. It’s an absolutely fantastic read. I couldn’t put the book down.

Last movie seen:

I think it was the one with Jack Nicolson and Matt Damon — The Departed. I saw it on the plane. That’s the only time I get to read or see movies because I have kids. I thought it was absolutely fabulous. I was well impressed.

Favorite sandwich:

I don’t eat bread — I gave it up years ago. But what I really like doing is getting iceberg lettuce and putting fillings in there — use the lettuce as a wrap. If you get some grated onions, carrots and cucumber, with a little soy sauce, some fresh ginger and garlic — it’s delicious. It’s really healthy and organic.

Favorite item of clothing:

I have to say my pajamas. I just love my jim-jams. They’ve got Winnie the Pooh [on them], cotton and really soft. They’re really childish, kiddy jim-jams.

Have you ever been starstruck?:

At the MTV Awards in 1995. I had spent my whole life being infatuated with James Hetfield from Metallica. We performed, and afterwards we all went to this bar backstage. He was standing across the way, so I said to my husband, ‘Oh my god there he is!’ Perchance my band was standing right behind him, so that gave me a chance. Alanis Morrisette’s song was on the radio, and he turned around and said “That chick! That sounds so like ‘Zombie’!” It was great — he actually talked to me. I was thinking “I am not worthy.” I could not say a word.

Do you collect anything?:

I like to collect seashells and leaves. I bring them home and put them under paper and color with a crayon. Having kids is really cool because you get to have all these people that are on the same page as you.

Previous jobs:

I had some pretty sad ones. I worked in a chip shop when I was 17. It was called Crank’s Corner, and we were serving all the drunks at 2 a.m., so you’d get a serious amount of verbal abuse. That was the hardest job I had, working in the chipper in my small town. It toughened you up.

Favorite time of day:

Crack of dawn — it’s a brand new day, a clean slate. Unless I have a really bad hangover, it’s great. If I’m sober I love to get up and go out for a walk, and listen to the birds waking up. It’s a great time to find peace with yourself.

Hanging on my bedroom wall:

Lots of mirrors. I’ve got a thing for mirrors. And there’s a flat TV screen, and the most amazing, austere painting that my husband and I bought in Ontario. It’s really weird, it’s very Hitchcock, scene of the crime. It’s this silhouette of black trees. I don’t know if it’s done with paint or charcoal. The water is red and the trees are black. It’s very eerie.

Ideal vacation:

It would be with my kids, my mother and my husband, and somewhere by the ocean. One of the most beautiful places I’ve ever been is Antigua. When you lay in bed, you’d open your eyes and there was no ceiling, because it’s hot all year round. You wake up when the sun comes up, and there’s no watches and no clocks. There’s no time there.

What’s something that surprises people about you?

The fact that I’m very, very blind. I can’t see anything. I’m hopeless without my glasses. When I’m on tour they have to make this massive set list — forty pieces of paper, twenty feet long, with giant writing. They have to put very thick, luminous white tape on the edge of the stage otherwise I’d fall off the stage.

What television show are you obsessed with?

Coronation Street.” It’s a soap opera based in Manchester, England. It’s the longest [running] show in Europe — like 60 years. My grandmother watched it, my mother watches it, I watch it and now my daughters watch it. It’s cute. It’s one of those soap operas that stands up to time. When I come back after working, it’s like mashed potatoes. It reminds me of my granny, when I was a kid.

Swear word you use too much:

Shit. Like, “Oh shit.”

If I could be any character from history or literature:

John Lennon. He’s kind of my idol.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Source: unknown
Autor: Rob Grainge.
Published: Wednesday, May 02, 2007

The lead singer of hit band The Cranberries, Dolores O’Riordan, has returned with her debut solo album, Are You Listening? Here the Irish songstress reveals the reasons behind The Cranberries’ hiatus and how she’s come a long way from gigging in a bread van.

What made you want to record a solo album?
I just arrived at that point in my life and hit the 30 mark. I’d done the five [albums] and greatest hits with The Cranberries and it seemed like the obvious thing to do. We’re all friends so there’s no bitterness and we could even do a reunion at some stage.

What can we expect from solo Dolores?
It’s a lot more experimental than anything else I’ve done before. It has some dark moments but also some bright and positive ones.

How different was it making an album without the rest of the band? This one was definitely more challenging, although time was my on my side – it took me four years. I wrote 30 tracks and we picked 12. I tried to do it properly and be really happy with it.

What are you listening to at the moment?
It’s really sad, I have an iPod but I don’t even know how to download. My husband downloaded two yoga CDs for me but I’m caught in a time warp. It’s because of having kids, I don’t listen to much if I’m not making it.

How did you end up as the wedding singer in Adam Sandler’s film, Click?
He just phoned me up and said that he and his wife’s favourite song was Linger [by The Cranberries]. He said he’d written this movie and it was important to have this song in the wedding scene. He’d lost his dad about a year before and he writes an awful lot from experience. I was there for ten days, flown out, had my own trailer, real first-class treatment. I kept thinking that I was dreaming. It was all a bit surreal.

How did you become the The Cranberries’ singer? I auditioned. They played a few songs for me, I played some songs for them. My wardrobe at the time was very dodgy, I was wearing pink pants and a frilly blouse and I really didn’t look the part, but when I sang I could tell they were impressed.

Did you ever guess how successful you’d become? We hadn’t a clue. If anything , we were very lucky. We just started working Ireland and going around in a bread van. One of the lads’
parents was a bread man. So we’d drive the van around surrounded by equipment and sitting on pans in the back.

Did you do a couple of deliveries and then go and play a gig?
No, but we used to eat the bread because we’d spent all our money on beer and we’d be starving. So there we were doing the beer and bread in the back of the van. The bread was always really fresh as well. Those were the days.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Autor: Chris Mugan
Source: The Independent, http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk
Published: 04 May 2007
 
Experience counts as Cranberries’ Dolores goes solo
The Cranberries’ vocalist is recording again after her maternity leave. Now solo, Dolores O’Riordan talks to Chris Mugan

Showcase gigs are usually uncomfortable, anodyne affairs, where a new signing performs for a record label’s staff and invitees. The cool reception and polite applause can make for a dispiriting start to a solo career. Dolores O’Riordan doesn’t let this get to her. The former lead singer of The Cranberries may only be performing in the basement of a private members’ club, but she punches the air as if reaching out to the furthest reaches of a vast arena. As the former singer of one of Ireland’s biggest cultural exports, adjusting to more intimate venues is going to take some time. At least she is enjoying performing again, after her old band stuttered to a close.

Next day, the star from Limerick looks just as fresh-faced as we chat about the gig in a north London office complex. She laughs when I mention the eye-popping energy of drummer Graham Hopkins, formerly of Northern Ireland’s explosive rock outfit Therapy?. “He broke six sticks that night, you know,” she says proudly, in a brogue that betrays her roots.

The vocalist is just as proud of the rest of her new band. “It’s a relief because I do want to tour and you need to have that energy and bond, so it’s all falling into place. Especially because this record is not a stylised or manufactured thing, it’s about the songs.”

As if to emphasis the point, she is dressed in black with a studded belt that would suit fellow Irish legend Phil Lynott. Despite the rock look, O’Riordan still exudes the maternal glow of a mother of three. She was last in the news in 2004 for being unsuccessfully sued by a former nanny, though it is more life-changing events that inform new album Are You Listening?. Death and new life are the two poles between which she has oscillated over a four-year stretch.

“I was doing it as therapy,” O’Riordan explains about the personal nature of her songwriting, and the time it took to release her first solo record. “I wanted to switch off and be a human being, so I escaped from the industry and the whole entertainment side of things. For 14 or 15 years I’d always felt under pressure, because there was always another album to come, and another album then.”

The Cranberries formed in Limerick in 1990, with 19-year-old O’Riordan imposing herself as the band’s precocious lyricist. Indeed, her calling card was the words to what became one of their biggest hits, “Linger”. Their debut album came out three years later and after a faltering start propelled them to fame on both sides of the Atlantic. Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We? was ignored in the US until The Cranberries toured there and got on MTV, while it took 12 months for “Linger” to become a UK hit.

Their rise continued with their second album No Need To Argue and its histrionic smash hit “Zombie”. Throughout this time, the band toured ceaselessly and racked up sales across the world. Such a focused work ethic stood them in good stead as their output declined in quality and the three albums that followed saw ever-decreasing sales. A sound now aimed at the arenas they played failed to win critical plaudits or new fans, leaving them with such consolations as the minor hit “Promises” in 1999 and a best international sales award in Taiwan. Fittingly for such constant giggers, their swan song was support slots with the Stones and AC/DC.

Almost since The Cranberries achieved success in the Nineties, rumours have abounded that O’Riordan would go solo. “People were always saying that,” O’Riordan complains. “I wanted to fulfil the journey with [the band], not just jump ship when we had the success. By going through the highs and lows, you learn from your mistakes.”

Stars, The Cranberries’ greatest hits set, was a full stop for the band, though before then its members knew the end was nigh, especially as they began to raise families. “There were a lot of things happening in the background, a lot of sick kids. We had one child in an incubator for three months and the same one had leukaemia,” O’Riordan says, careful to protect identities. “One of the guys was coming from hospital to the stage for a year and a half. Another guy got glaucoma, so there was so much illness.”

Only now can O’Riordan admit the toll that success took on her. When she auditioned for the band in 1990, this youngest of seven siblings still lived with her parents. As The Cranberries achieved success in the US, their singer became infamous for a haughty manner and elfin size, which she reveals was due to an eating disorder. She admits to having gone through therapy early in her career after a nervous breakdown in 1994.

“I was 90 pounds in weight, not sleeping, not eating and having a lot of panic attacks. I didn’t know what was happening; you don’t when you’re cracking up, and I couldn’t go home. I didn’t want to go back there with my tail between my legs; I was too proud. Then I went to see a really great psychoanalyst. He saw a lot of entertainers. I needed to get away and find myself. So I went off to the forest for a few months and learnt how to relax. I smelt a flower for the first time in five years and started crying because I realised I’d forgotten about life.”

O’Riordan uses the word “human” a lot, as if to stress that being human is more than simply being a member of a species, it is a state of mind. Her lyrics, too, are full of self-help jargon, whether it is being unable to “relate to you”, or learning to “accept things”.

In 2003,O’Riordan’s mother-in-law was diagnosed with breast cancer and given eight months to live. That inspired “Black Widow”, one of the earliest songs to be written for this album. The singer took time out with her Canadian husband to support his family, putting her kids into school there. “She came round a lot, so that song was about watching her,” O’Riordan remembers. “You don’t know what cancer is like until you go through it with someone, starting on the inside and eating its way to the surface.”

If she has taken one lesson from her time with The Cranberries, it has been not to take herself too seriously. “It’s not about being perfect. If I make a mistake, it’s not the end of the world. When I was younger, I’d be so depressed. I’d sit for hours in my dressing room and couldn’t move on in my head. In my twenties, I thought I knew so much about the world, but when I hit 30 I made so many boo-boos I realised I never knew it all. It’s peculiar when you’re young to have everyone looking at you; you get paranoid and self-conscious. I’d stay in my room doing six hours of yoga.”

She admits to behaving in an arrogant manner. “If you’re with yourself all the time and not meeting anyone or experiencing anyone, you can’t evolve. You get up on stage and get this attention that isn’t natural. I lacked normality and relationships. I had no friends for four or five years, while they all went to college.”

This explains the unevenness of some of her songwriting with The Cranberries, when she would churn out such desperate polemics as “Bosnia” (”We live in our secure surroundings/ And people die out there”). O’Riordan rolls her eyes at the memory. “Taking four years off was such a good idea, because you experience so much. When you try to write an album in a year and you’re living in a tour bus, you can only write about being famous or being stuck in a hotel room.”

What immediately strikes you about Are You Listening? is how personal the record is. “When you go through experiences, whether they are really dark or beautiful, they give you inspiration, but it’s just life, isn’t it? There were no boundaries because I was representing myself and I felt I could really spit things out without inhibitions. If you have pain and issues, once you get them out of your system, every time you perform you feel better. You know you’re not the only one, because everyone else feels it. You become human again.”

Another part of the learning process has been the varied collaborations since she left The Cranberries. O’Riordan has worked with the German dance pioneers Jam & Spoon, Italy’s famed crooner Zucchero and on the soundtrack for Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ. She even had a cameo as a wedding singer in the Adam Sandler vehicle Click.

But it was working with David Lynch’s favourite composer Angelo Badalamenti that had the most impact. “You learn something from all these people, like with Jam & Spoon I was doing a more soulful style, but I contacted Angelo direct. I loved Twin Peaks, and I love that darker music. I realised how much I could do on my own, when he’d send me music and I would lay down vocals at home.”

O’Riordan nursed her youngest girl Dakota on the set of Click, after a period of inactivity to raise the child and ensure that her other children did not feel left out. When she returned home, she wrote her song for Dakota, the first single “Ordinary Day”, and set about writing in earnest. She’s married to the former Duran Duran tour manager Don Burton, so forming a band was simplicity itself. The most surprising thing about the album, especially after the lilting melancholy of “Ordinary Day”, is its rocky extremes, notably the super-heavy, Metallica-style power chords on “In the Garden” and the venomous “Loser”.

It is less of a shock when you learn that alongside Therapy?’s Hopkins, there is the bassist Marco Mendoza, who has played with Thin Lizzy and Whitesnake, while Toronto-based Steve Demarchi played guitar for The Cranberries. Yet O’Riordan had not planned on a rock sound. She mentions the song “Letting Go”, again about her mother-in-law, and which was leaked.

“When I started out recording this album, I wrote two songs that didn’t make it on to the record. ‘Letting Go’ had this funeral march thing, and ‘Without You’ was about missing my own family. They were both soft, piano-driven songs, so I thought this album was going to be nice and ethereal, but then I wrote ‘Black Widow’ and I started yelling. I realised I needed drums to take it to the next level, so it all kind of unfolded from there. I didn’t know what kind of music it was, because I don’t have that much knowledge.”

Another track, “Angel Fire”, reminds us of O’Riordan’s spiritual side. She was brought up Catholic and still has fond memories of the former Pope, John Paul II. She is a regular performer at the Vatican’s Christmas concerts, where she premiered the song last year. “I’m Christian in lots of ways, but not conventional. A lot of the stuff I learnt, I take with me today - that we should let each other be ourselves. I was chuffed to see the inside [of the Vatican] and I met Il Papa, who was lovely, very saintly. I was mad about him. I thought he really cared for the poor and he loved to meet the people. I saw him when he came to Limerick, when I was a kid. So it was pretty mindblowing to take my mum out to meet him.”

Despite the involvement of the mega-producer Youth on the single and “Apple of My Eye”, recording Are You Listening? has been a relatively stripped-down affair. The band would fly in to either Toronto or Dublin, where her children go to school, and lay down up to six songs in a two-day session. “They were really great players and it was great that we didn’t have the pressure of a major studio,” O’Riordan enthuses. “Sometimes you draw a mental blank in that situation, which you don’t have in a little room.”

O’Riordan has rediscovered her magic in homely surroundings. With a band she trusts and a healthy work-life balance, she is unlikely to consider a Cranberries reunion in the short term. Indeed, the solo artist jokingly points out that 2010 would mark her old group’s 20th anniversary.

Relations between them remain cordial, though, with offers of guitars for her forthcoming tour. Not that she needs their help - O’Riordan has found that she gets further when she travels light.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Source: Telegraph
Date: April 21, 2007

Ten years ago the Cranberries were the biggest indie band in the world, but the pressure of fame caused singer Dolores O’Riordan to have a nervous breakdown. Now she is ready to face the world again – alone. By Craig McLean

Whatever happened to the Cranberries? In the early 1990s they were the little Irish band that had it all – four backwater teenagers from Limerick who formed a group, toured in a bread van, drank a load, had a laugh and, as if by magic, signed a six-album deal in London with the American arm of an international record label. The songs, co-written and sung by Dolores O’Riordan, were the key to their appeal. She was an elfin frontwoman with the voice of a giantess, a slip of a thing who could slip from Celtic etherealism to punchy arena-rock drama.

Dolores O’Riordon
Dolores O’Riordon: ‘I honestly think that it was beyond anorexia - it was bigger than that. I was having a nervous breakdown.’

Their songs and their sound – a U2-lite fronted by a less strident Sinead O’Connor – made them global megastars, particularly in America. The singles Linger and Dreams were huge hits, ubiquitous on MTV, radio, TV shows and over the PA systems in every high-street shop. In 1994, almost a year and a half after its original UK release, their debut album Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We? reached number one in the UK, its rise powered by the sheer momentum of their phenomenal American achievements.

O’Riordan, now 35 and preparing to release her debut solo album, Are You Listening?, remembers the madness of her first trip to America at the age of 19. ‘I was blown away, “Woah, this is so cool.”’ And then, ‘A few weeks later, every flippin’ establishment you walk into, you’re on TV. And you’re going, “Who’s that?” Which is kind of dangerous. “Oh, that’s the Entertainer, but I’m not that person.” That was how I used to try and deal with it, which isn’t very healthy really. I often see young people doing that, referring to themselves in the third person. At the time you think that’s OK. But later on you go, “That’s… crazy.”’

She was, by her own admission, a hopelessly naive country girl – one record company executive who met the Cranberries back then described O’Riordan as like ‘someone who’d fallen from space’. ‘I think there’s a difference between somebody who grows up in Paris or London and goes to Los Angeles,’ O’Riordan says. ‘But if you grow up in the green fields, and you rarely go into the city, you’re so overprotected that when you do go to LA it’s almost a bigger slap in the head.’

In their first flush of success in America, the Cranberries supported their hit debut album by touring with Suede, The The, Duran Duran and then, as O’Riordan remembers it, ‘tons of headline tours’. They played the huge Woodstock festival in 1994. On one tour they were doing two shows a night. And the hard work paid off: by the mid-1990s the Cranberries were the second-biggest Irish band in the world. They had Number One singles in 26 countries. By the end of the decade, propelled by the subsequent big hit singles Ode To My Family and Zombie, they had sold 28 million copies of their first three albums. Their singer, meanwhile, was often accorded the dubious accolade of ‘Ireland’s richest woman’.
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And then… what? The Cranberries slipped off the radar. There were another two albums, Bury the Hatchet, and in 2001, Wake Up and Smell the Coffee, but you could be forgiven for not noticing. Maybe the band barely noticed either. For a long time, almost since the release of their first album, O’Riordan, Noel Hogan (guitar), his brother Mike Hogan (bass) and Fergal Lawler (drums) had collectively given the impression of a band who didn’t much care for being wildly popular. O’Riordan, especially, was characterised as at best shy and withdrawn, and at worst moody and erratic.

Almost as soon as we have sat down on a sofa upstairs in her Dublin house, without being asked to, O’Riordan starts explaining. And explaining herself. She does this without much in the way of grammatical pauses, nor pauses for breath. ‘What happened was we did five albums with the Cranberries and then the Greatest Hits, and four years ago I decided to take time off and step away from the band. Because there was a lot of stuff going on behind the scenes that was much more important than being in a rock band. My husband Don’s mother, Denise, was diagnosed with cancer, and she was given eight months to live. We decided to go and stay there and help live her days with her, ’cause you don’t get those chances again, right? That’s the priority and she’s the children’s grandmother.’

From upstairs floats the sound of Taylor, nine, Molly, six, and Dakota, two, O’Riordan and husband Don Burton’s three children. (She has a stepson, Donny, 15, who lives in Toronto with his mother, Burton’s former partner.) A strapping Canadian a decade her senior, Burton was tour-managing Duran Duran when he and O’Riordan met. After a two-month courtship they were engaged, getting married in the summer of 1994. The bride, infamously, wore a see-through dress.

‘Behind the scenes as well as in the band there was a lot of illness,’ O’Riordan continues, oblivious to what is going on downstairs – her mother, Eileen, is on hand, as she is every day, to help with her children. ‘And when the Greatest Hits came out and we did that tour, I just felt I wanted to take a break, totally. Probably because, as well, I was so young when I got famous. I did album, tour, album, tour, album, tour, then I had a public nervous breakdown where I just lost tons of weight.’

In October 1996, after the release of their third album To the Faithful Departed, a burnt-out band cancelled the remainder of a world tour. O’Riordan, especially, simply wasn’t up to it. At the time she weighed six and a half stone, and she was racked with self-doubt. She had always been insecure – she readily volunteers that this was because, ‘I didn’t get a lot of attention from my dad when I was young. That’s a big part of it for girls. Because your dad is the first love of your life. If he doesn’t put you on his lap and give you a pet, you do end up not really liking yourself that much.’ Convent-educated O’Riordan is the youngest of seven children, and was raised in a strict Catholic household. Her father, Terence, was injured in an accident when she was a child, and so her mother had to support the family.

Receiving the adulation of countless thousands of concert-goers, it seems, was no help. That was the ‘wrong love’. Working and travelling but ‘having no friends around you, and no normal love, and no reality – of course you’re gonna turn into a kind of a lunatic eventually. So, it happened to me,’ she says, a broad smile fixed across her face.
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Was she anorexic? ‘I honestly think that it was beyond anorexia – it was bigger than that. I was having a nervous breakdown. Losing lots of weight. I wasn’t sleeping, I couldn’t eat. I was suffering an awful lot from out-of-control anxiety attacks. I just couldn’t control my motor skills – I was panicking too much to move my limbs.’

O’Riordan says that her paralysis would occur before going on stage, meeting strangers, ‘or sitting with strange people. It was very weird. It was a bit scary. So I went to see the psychiatrist and he just said it was too much stress.’

She began to recover, the healing process helped along by the birth of her first child the year after the diagnosis of her breakdown. But the fire had gone out of the Cranberries, and their music. They had spent the preceding six years racing to the top of the mountain. They would spend the next six sliding slowly down the other side.

It is a sunny Saturday in Dublin’s affluent outer suburbs. Howth is a millionaires’ playground, albeit one disguised as an unostentatious, family-oriented neighbourhood. The politician and businessman Feargal Quinn is a neighbour, Ronan Keating of the recently reformed Boyzone lives nearby. O’Riordan is back home for just a day. She is busy promoting Are You Listening?, her first job of work in four years, and right now she is in a different European country every day.

In writing songs for herself rather than a band, ‘there was an element of freedom that I’d never had before. When I wrote Black Widow [about her mother-in-law’s battle with cancer], it was my first time experimenting with dark music. I’ve always played around with aggression, happiness, sadness, but never darkness.’

Are You Listening? is a collection of well-crafted pop songs, not as maudlin, wishy-washy and lumpen as the Cranberries’ latter albums. Her remarkable voice, too, is less histrionic. The punchy Ordinary Days (dedicated to Dakota) and the ballad Apple of my Eye (about Burton) have melodies to rival those long-ago career-launching singles. On the big rock thumper, Loser, she doesn’t pull any punches (‘The moral of the adventure is this/Take me for granted, you are taking the piss’) but refuses to say who it is about, save that it is someone in the music industry.

As she bustles about the house she is cheerful and welcoming, with a slightly manic, chat-chat-chat edge. This could come of the speedy pace at which she and Burton are operating just now (he is managing her) after four years’ ‘retirement’. Or it could come from the ingrained trauma of the 1990s, and the subsequent therapy she underwent – she was a patient of ‘celebrity therapist’ Beechy Colclough, Harley Street confidant of everyone from Elton John to Robbie Williams and Kate Moss. It is hard to imagine how full-on and clenched she might be if she wasn’t a serious yoga addict (she does two hours a day).

Today her house is a base for the Telegraph photoshoot and the attendant frocks and finery – much to her daughters’ excitement, and much to her son’s consternation. For the first couple of years of their lives, Taylor and (for a shorter period) Molly were on the road with O’Riordan. But none of her children can remember mummy working, or being on television. Yet the past year, which O’Riordan has spent writing and recording her solo album in her home studios, here in County Dublin and in Ontario (their Canadian home is normally described as a log cabin, but one imagines it is rather grander than that), has co­incided with dawning consciousness on the part of Taylor. ‘He’s been coming home from school and saying, “Mammy, my friends tell me that you’re famous and that you’re from a band…”’

O’Riordan and Burton have lived in this spacious, modern villa for three years. The walls in the hallway are covered with large-scale photographs taken at the children’s christenings – O’Riordan, glowing new mother in sleeveless dress, Celtic cross tattoo visible on one upper arm, loveheart tattoo on the other. Another shows her extended family, gathered after the ceremony, cheering for the camera. And Burton, beaming dad, in leather trousers and, in another, a pink brocaded suit.

Jostling for wallspace in the hall and up the stairwell are some of O’Riordan’s music-industry awards: the 1994 award from America for Most Performed Song on College Campus, for Zombie, O’Riordan’s heartfelt if clumsy song about the Troubles (‘In your head they are fighting/With their tanks and their bombs/And their bombs, and their guns’); an acknowledgement of the nomination of Zombie for an Ivor Novello songwriting award; silver, gold and platinum discs from South Africa, Australia and umpteen other countries.
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Downstairs, the children’s bedrooms, a riot of Bratz and Spider-Man duvets. Next door, the bathroom, with a pile of copies of Motor Boats Monthly and The Robb Report Collection (Real Estate and Interior Design) by the toilet. Opposite, the lounge-cum-bar. Finally, upstairs, in the loft-style space, is the office and O’Riordan’s little studio, easel (she loves to paint) and racks and racks of stagewear gathered over 10 years touring the world. All in all it’s fancy, but not as fancy as their previous abode: Riversfield Stud was a 150-acre farm in Kilmallock, near her hometown of Limerick. ‘This is a real family home,’ O’Riordan says. ‘We’re so much happier in this home than we were in the big place. That was very lonely.’

They had moved there in 1998, shortly after the birth of Taylor, at the height of O’Riordan’s traumas. She remembers being in Australia when her paternal grandmother died; she couldn’t get home for the funeral, because that would have meant halting the Cranberries’ tour. ‘It’s not just about you, it’s about all these people around you. There are hundreds of people depending on you.’ She had been forced to spend most of her first pregnancy in Canada, away from her mother. For an avowed family woman like O’Riordan, not to mention one feeling lonely and isolated already, this was a serious wrench. ‘While I was pregnant, my maternal grandmother passed away – I was in the morgue at her funeral, and there were paparazzi outside. I knew then that I had to get out of the country and go somewhere where I could recover and get away from it completely.’

Was buying the stud farm a continuation of that reclusive behaviour? ‘It was like my Neverland. I was having that, “God, who am I?” moment. But I couldn’t go out and walk around casually. People would come up and go, “If I had your money, I’d burn it.” But you couldn’t go to the pub and have one pint. So I built my own pubs and my own world. But you become a bit dysfunctional and a bit weird after a while. Too reclusive. ‘Sometimes I’d be asking the staff, “Will you come in, I’m lonely!”’ she cackles, her eyes wide. Nor did her young family ease her traumas. ‘The kids’ bedrooms were miles away. A different wing! They’re quite cheap those big old manors, you can buy them down the country for a couple of million.’

Amid the torrent of her speech, O’Riordan offers glimpses of what sounds like a terrible existence, where her fame and her wealth cursed both her and her family. She is from the countryside herself, and knows the ways of rural Ireland, but talks of her ‘sticking out’ in the little towns and villages. She says, ‘Imagine living in this big house and you can’t go out because somebody’ll throw stones at you or chase you. “Your mammy’s nee nee ne-ne neer,”’ she says in a sing-song sneer.

Finally, in 2004, they sold the house and most of the land for E4.5 million (?3 million). Now, in County Dublin, she only needs a housekeeper, and the children go to a local school ‘and we’re part of the community. It’s very safe, it’s much better for the kids. I can go out, walk around, nobody comes up to me. Some people ask for autographs sometimes, but that’s it.’

But being dubbed Ireland’s richest woman can’t have helped, I suggest. ‘Oh, it’s crazy. I flippin’ wish, man!’ Her reputed super-wealth was, she agrees, like a neon sign over her head. ‘Here she comes, who wants a free drink? Here, I’d like to build something, please charge me 10 times!’ she hoots, manically. The implication is that she was exploited, targeted. Indeed, in 2004 she and Burton were taken to court by their former child-minder, and accused of false imprisonment, breach of contract and negligence. The lawsuit failed. Equally, during my afternoon with O’Riordan, I overhear Burton talking about obsessive fans, in Belgium, Amsterdam and New Zealand, and how he has had to get Interpol involved.

‘It used to be upsetting,’ O’Riordan replies when I bring up the subject of overzealous fans. ‘I decided there’s nothing I can do about it by dwelling on it. So if I ever get anything weird I take it to the police, and they just deal with it. But you have to realise that it’s usually just a coward, someone trying to play with your head, mind games.’

It is time to take the photographs. We walk down to the nearby cliffs overlooking Dublin Bay, taking a route through the 2.5-acre plot overlooking the sea on which she and Burton are about to begin building a new house. Burton, a bit of a handyman, describes their plans for a three-level, 10,000 sq ft home, complete with swimming-pool, gym and recording studio. It seems that they will continue to live in the villa up the hill, though.

O’Riordan, resplendent in a Gucci dress, is radiant in every sense. She is still very thin, bony almost, and incredibly petite. But she is full of beans, even more so when Burton’s near to hand – she calls him ‘my rock, my pillar’. It is hard to imagine her even attempting a comeback without his steady management behind the scenes.

The Cranberries are not completely defunct, she says. ‘I stepped away from the group four years ago. I walked out of this big, big room I was in for a very long time into a smaller room, a different room, an interesting new room. But I didn’t shut the door. It’s kind of open.’ She says she is not in touch with ‘the boys’ (who all live in Limerick) – she says they were never that close in the first place – although Burton talks to Noel Hogan ‘a lot’.

‘I can’t really see myself going back immediately. The reunion that the Police are doing is quite respectable and quite decent because it’s 30 years since the split [it’s actually more like 20]. That sounds kind of cool. They’ve given it a good old break and did their own stuff.’

Two weeks later, Dolores O’Riordan plays her first live show in four years, an intimate, brief showcase event in the basement of the Hospital, an arts venue in London’s Covent Garden. She and her band – seasoned session players with a distinct whiff of gnarly old rock dudes about them – are dressed in black. She is in feisty form, kicking her white-trainer-clad feet high in the air. Her cover of In the Ghetto is cringy – too much melodrama, not enough soul – but the new songs sound as powerful as the old ones she plays, Dreams and Linger. Performing the hits that launched and then defined her, she says, holds no fear. ‘The audience always join in. And it’s, “Oh, fun time!” as opposed to, “I’m-performing-for-you time.” So the old energy’s going round the room like this…’ – she waggles her arms around her – ‘…in a circle, wooh!’

It is not so much a zen approach to rock’n’roll as a yogic one. And, in the end, it’s a grown-up approach – that of a woman who became famous while still a girl, and got trapped there. It has taken O’Riordan this long – and three children – to free herself. ‘I was obsessed with my career,’ she freely confesses. ‘It was my life, now it’s just a hobby. It’s fun. Thankfully, by making those decisions to have children when I did, I have the possibility now to have a second life with them. My mam said to me, “Careers come and go, but children are for ever.” It’s true. I’d hate to be a very successful career woman and have all this accomplishment, but have no children or grandchildren. Who’d be around when you were dying, like? Who’d mind you?’

# ‘Are You Listening?’ is released on May 7

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Source: Zegut
Date: March 2007

Zegut: She is Irish. Her name is Dolores. She’s releasing a magnificent album. She’s the ex singer of the cranberries.

Z: Thank you for accepting our invitation to “Focus” “M6 Music Rock” . The first question, how do you pronounce your name?

Dolores: Dolores O’Riordan.

Z: You are the ex-singer of The Cranberries. What motivated you for this solo album?

D: I think since I was 18 years old, I arrived in the US with The Cranberries. The success of The Cranberries was very big for an 18 years old girl. I probably spent 15 years with the band. I went on the bus, did a tour. After the tour, I made another CD. After the CD, I did promotion. And my life is like this [roller coaster]. Between the 15 years with the band I had four children, but when I had a baby, after three months, I had to go back with The Cranberries. Now it’s the first time in my life that I can stay at home for long time. During that time I wrote from time to time. Something would happen and it would become like a therapy for me. To be honest, it was the best 4 years in my life. For that reason, the songs and the album are fresh. The inspiration came from the children, mother, father, and the things that happened in life.

Z: You are signed to a small label. Is it an intentional choice?

D: Yes, it is an intentional choice. I think that for an artists like me, Sanctuary is a very good company, because they like to take time to understand artists. I am a unique and different artist unlike the manufactured big artists. I feel like they appreciate me, and they’re working with me with respect. I have respect for them. This makes you feel better everyday when you wake up.

Z: you’re not just a product.

D: exactly, not just a product.

Z: Don’t you think that in a few years there will be in one side the artists and the other side the people who like the artists and go to their concerts, and what is between the two, the means, will disappear or change?

D: This is one of the good things of the internet is that it takes away all the middlemen. It gets to that point where the artists can talk directly to their fans and you know how many people are into you. Whereas before manufactured artists and major record companies had so much control, I suppose, because the radio will chose what to play and who was played, but now it’s definitely a democracy where the people can choose for themselves through the internet and through downloading. so that’s cool, you know!

Z: As an adolescent, what kind of music did you listen to?

D: I really liked Alternative music like Depeche mode and Cure…..etc (in English)

Z: In the new album there are some titles like “In The Garden” “Stay with Me” “Black Widow” there is a dark side with some metal guitars. Were the four years that inspired the songs hard?

D: When I started writing this album, I wrote all the album on the piano. The Guitarist came in and transposed the piano chords to guitar with strange guitar tuning. With strange chords and strange tuning, when he played… We’re experimenting….. etc (in English)

Z: Apart from liking AC/DC, having an album with some Dark side, and a guitarist who likes metal, would that mean that you might have a cover during your concerts, for example something like AC/DC.

Z: Have you definitely turned the cranberries page? Are you going to continue with your solo career?

D: I don’t know, but the door is open.

Z: The Police are reuniting after 30 years. Do you think that’d happen with the cranberries?

D: Maybe, But I think when there’s only 6 or 8 years, it’s not much. If it’s a long time, I think it’s a good reunion, cos people wait.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Source: Madrid, Spain
Date: March 2007

Q: Fine, and you?
D: Happy to be in
Madrid. What a beautiful day, and what beautiful sights!

Q: Yes, it’s the first hot day. It’s a great day.
D: Are you Irish, you’re so white…

Q: No, no, no, I’m from here. It’s just that I hate tanning.
D: You get burned? Like me. I have to protect my face.

Q: I ‘m going to start by giving you bad news. Did you know your CD leaked?
D: Yes they told me.

Q: How does it sit with you?
D: It’s inevitable. I knew it would happen, and it has happened. Things have changed from a couple years ago with the internet. The days where you waited until the day of the actual CD release date are gone. This happens to all groups, it’s the way things are. It would be worse if people didn’t like it, but people are liking it.

Q: Do you follow your fans opinions on the internet?
D: I don’t really like computers. I haven’t even been to my myspace page. I’ve heard them talk about it. I wrote a letter and gave it to my manager, and he put it up. But I don’t even know how computers work, I don’t even know how to turn one on. I create & write songs, I like writing songs. I don’t like computers.

Q: How did you find out your CD leaked then?
D: My manager told me.

Q: Why did you choose « Ordinary Day » , such a calm song for a single?
D: My record label thought it was a good song to represent the new record, and I agreed.

Q: When we were young doesn’t stick more? Woudn’t it be more successful?
D: I don’t know, it didn’t worry me what would be a single and what woudn’t be. I only write the songs. Other people decide. They know the market better, so they pick the singles and I don’t. I’m not good at picking out what are the best songs. All the songs are mine, and I like them all, so I don’t care to know what the single will be. They where talking about picking “When we were young” like you said, and another one too.. I don’t remember.

Q: October ?
D: No (thinks for a while) …Apple.

Q: Isn’t that too slow?
D: Yes it’s very simple. But it’s so simple that it’s pretty.

Q: Critics never accepted the simplicity of the Cranberries. People loved the songs, they had CD’s like “No Need to Argue” in their hearts but it never appeared as one of the greatest CD’s of the 90s. Personally, I don’t understand it.
D: Neither do I, but it doesn’t worry me too much. People have very good memories about that album, very hard times in their lives. At that time it helped a lot of people come forward. That is what matters, not that critics pay attention to you.

Q:Do you hope for better reviews now? You don’t care?
D:I don’t think a lot about that. I’ve been doing this for 20 years. You write what you want, you accept the critics and don’t think too much about it. You can’t change it.

Q: From 0 to 11. What percentage do we have of listening to another Cranberries album ?
D: It would happen, of course. The door is open. The door doesn’t close. Who knows.

Q: Have you listened to Mono Band’s record. The guitarist of the Cranberries?
D: No I don’t have it.

Q: You haven’t heard the songs?
D: No

Q: Why?
D: I don’t have time, I’m too busy.

Q: You don’t speak to Noel often?
D: My husband talks to him. Before we made music together and now we don’t, so what are we going to talk about? He’s not a woman, you can’t talk to him about woman things. I would call his wife in that case. We talk about motherly things, about our kids.

Q: You could talk about music, because you’re writing music without him for the first time.
D: I don’t talk to him about my music. I think I need to talk to you, the press, the media about my music but I’m not going to ask another musician if they like my album. If we saw each other we would talk, but we live in different cities, and we’re both busy with our kids, we never see each other.

Q: The breakup sounds a little worse then you made it seem.
D: No at all! We haven’t broken up, we’re on a break.

Q: In these last couple years death has been present in your career and is present in your new songs. In the past you wrote a lot of songs about religion. Have you become more conservative over the years?
D:
Yes everyone becomes more conservative over the years. But I don’t fight with myself like I did when I was younger. I’ve learn to accept myself. And you? You’re around 30 right?

Q: Not yet, I’m 27.
D: When you pass 30 you look back and you realize that you have to accept, you can’t always be fighting with yourself. You have to take life calmly.

Q: This is the first CD we see you with really long hair, you have left behind your more masculine look. Why do you have long hair?
D: I’m very busy with my kids and I don’t have time to cut it. Motherhood takes a lot of work. If you have short hair you have to cut it every 4 weeks, so having it longer is easier.

Q: Speaking of your kids, it seems that on your new CD there are a lot of songs about your nanny.
D: I don’t have a nanny.

Q: Not the one now, I mean, the one in the past.
D: If you’re reffering to the one that sued me, there are no songs about her.

Q: There was an article that said you where writing a lot of songs about your nanny, and I thought they were «In the garden» , «Loser», or «Accept Things».
D: Rumors, they aren’t true.

Q: How did you decide to incorporate Irish music into «Human Spirit»?
D: I play the tin whistle because I think it fits the song.

Q: Do you think the result is something similar to the “Corrs” or do you think that it has nothing to do with them?
D: Well they use the tin whistle too, so it could sound similar because it’s the same instrument.

Q: Why aren’t there more Angelo Badalamenti songs on the new album?
D: Because when I work with Angelo, I work with Angelo, and when I do my own record, I do my own record. Angelo is a genius in my opinion. I love “twin peaks” and “tercipelo azul” and that’s why I wanted to work with him. I was very lucky to be able to work with him, and that he wanted to work with me as well.

Q: Are you interested in making music for films?
D: Yes and for me now it’s easier, I can work from my studio back at home.

Q: And being an actress? It was rumored that you wanted to be in a musical with AC/DC.
D: Yes it’s true I spoke with Brian Johnson one night at a restaurant, we had drank a lot but in the end it didn’t work out. Maybe there was too much alcohol in the process. It would be great if we did it, sometimes you talk about these things without taking them seriously and you don’t know if it will work out or not. About being an actress, maybe one day when I’m older. Right now I’m occupied with this.

Q: Are you ready for the tour? Will you play Cranberries songs?
D: I might play old songs because fans like hearing old songs.

Q: And do you want to play them?
D: Yes, why not. One over the other. Possibly the hits, of course.

Q: Why Cranberries CD do you remember the most/worst?
D: I remember all of them. All of them had their good/bad things. I dealt with good and bad people. Life is always like that.

Q: You don’t have a special place in your heart for any of them?
D: This one right now, is very special to me.

Q: Artist always say that their current album is their best.
D: It’s where you are now, you don’t have to look back. This record is more about me now.


Q: Musically, who influenced you on this record? «October» kind of sounds like Colplay, although really Coldplay came after the Cranberries.
D: I don’t listen to much music, I don’t have time. I can’t judge my music, or compare it to other artist, I leave that to the press. But thanks, I love Coldplay.


Q: Loser kind of sounds like Morrissey. Do you like the smiths, or was that more the guys?
D: No, I love Morrissey.

Q: How would you sum up are you listening, a sad or happy record?
D: It’s a CD I wrote about my experiences over the past four years. And I hope you like it.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Source: Chueca.com
Date: march, 2007

Dolores O’Riordan announced the temporary separation of the Cranberries in 2003. But she has not until now decided to publish her new album. We spoke with her on her new release, ‘Are you listening’, on sale in May, on the future of her old band and on how it feels for a religious person like her to be a gay-lesbian icon.

Q:If you could imagine how the Cranberries 6th record would to be, what would be the difference between that record and ‘Are you listening’
D: It would be a completely differenct record, because the songs I wrote with the guys were completely different.


Q: However, songs like ‘Loser’ or ‘When we were young’ would fit in a Cranberries album.
D: Yes, because I wrote 70% of the Cranberries music and I write my own songs now. I haven’t changed, and I’m still the same person, and also the same singer. My record is more experimental and for the first time I’ve had to take care of everything myself. Different musicians helped me, and for the first time it’s been pretty experimental. It took me way longer, but I enjoy taking everything calmly, relaxing, and resting.


Q: The first time that there where rumors of your solo career was in the early 90s. When was the first time you really thought about it?
D: Not until I record the ‘Greatest Hits’. Before it had gone through my head, but I knew I wanted to finish what I had with the guys: the 5 CD’s, and the contract we had signed. I wanted to finish the Cranberries with the Cranberries.


Q: SO do you consider the project completely done?
D: It’s a possibility we will reunite, of course. The door is open. It hasn’t closed, who knows.


Q: The theme of death has always appeared in a lot of your songs, and now it’s present in your song ‘Black Widow’. How do you confront it?
D: ‘Black Widow’ is a song about my mother in law’s death. She had cancer, and she fought with all sorts of treatments: chemotherapy, radiation?€¦but everything made her worse. ‘Stay with me’ is a song about cancer my father had. Fortunatley, he was able to get better, but the song is about the fear I felt about losing him. Music is very good therapy to deal with death. It’s a part of your life. Everyone is going to die, everyone around you. And in the end you have to try to move forward.


Q: Religion must help calm your fears, because you are a very religious person. At least from what we can tell with songs like ‘Angel fire’ or ‘This is the day’
D: It’s good to have faith, to think there’s something after death, that we are going to a better place. Maybe we’ll find eachother in another place. It’s good that heaven exist. It would be horrible to think that one day you’ll be underground and that’s it?€¦so I like to think there’s something else.


Q: Does your religion prohibit you from supporting gay marriage?
D: I don’t understand conventional/established religion. I don’t follow anyones established rules. It’s just that I have faith and I beleive in a greater spirit, & that’s it. If gay people want to get married, that’s very good. Everyone is happy.


Q: At one point you became a lesbian icon, given your androginy. Does that bother you given your religion?
D: It was just cos I had short hair. But why would it bother me? I think we should accept each other the way we are. Humans have to be able to love each other. Love can present itself in many different ways. If girls find me attractive I find that fantastic. And same thing if guys find me attractive.

Q: There are songs that seem to be inspired by your husband, and they sound very happy.
D: ‘Apple of my eye’ is a very obvious one. It’s about loving someone, it’s very simple. I think it’s such a simple song that it’s very pretty.

Q: Part of Cranberries charm was that simplicity, but the critics never seem to understand that.
D: I have never cared what the critics thought about my lyrics being too simple. I think it’s always been a charm about the music that I do, and I think that’s why people like my songs.

Q: In this new record you worked with new producers like Dan Brodbeck and Youth. How did you find them?
D: Through Sanctuary. They suggested people for me to work with. Most of the disk belongs to Dan Brodbeck. Youth simply came to
Canada and worked on a couple of songs one of them being ‘Ordinary Day’. It was great working with new people. I can’t find a word to describe all the ideas Dan brought in. It was a bunch of things.

Q: What music have you bene listening to lately?
D: I don’t listen to much music now, but I really like Snow Patrol and Coldplay. I don’t have a lot of time now to listen to music. I’m very busy.

Q: There are some metal songs in the album. Do you like metal?
D: Yes I like: Metallica, Aerosmith. I like Think Lizzy and Evanescence.

Q: You start your solo tour on May 29th in Barcelona. Do you hope to come back with a more extensive tour?
D: Right now there are 12 dates in
Europe, and 15 in North America in June. I hope to come back to bigger places. It all depends on how the record does. It depends on a lot of things how my kids are doing, how the record is received, how everyone feels.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Ingrid Randoja

 

Dolores O’Riordan’s unmistakable Irish lilt comes wafting over the phone line. She’s in Toronto, having just returned from her cottage in Northern Ontario. Why does the former lead singer of the 1990s band The Cranberries, and a girl from County Limerick, own a cottage in Ontario? “Well I married a Canadian,” she says with a laugh.

Thirty-six-year-old O’Riordan married Duran Duran’s Canadian tour manager Don Burton in 1994, and although the couple and their four kids — ages 16, nine, six and two — live in Ireland, they spend their holidays Canada.

It’s also the place where O’Riordan wrote many of the songs found on her first solo album, Are You Listening? (available May 15th).

“I love it there,” she says referring to her getaway in the woods. “I love the rustic life, and it’s great to have a pad in Canada for when we’re touring.”

The Cranberries disbanded in 2004 after 13 years together and producing five albums that sold a total of 32-million copies worldwide. That meant O’Riordan would finally have the chance to write and sing — in her distinctive, trilling voice — her own songs.

“It took me four years to make the album, the longest I’ve ever gone between albums, and that’s a good thing because I didn’t rush it and I picked the cream of the crop out of the 32 songs I wrote.”

Are You Listening? is bursting with O’Riordan’s trademark vocal dramatics. Songs that begin quietly eventually grow louder and more elaborate, and her haunting voice remains at the centre of it all. Since O’Riordan started singing with The Cranberries when she was just 18, I ask if anyone tried to alter or interfere with her singing style.

“No,” she says quickly. “I was never trained or anything. I just go out there and feel the music and let it in. It’s a spiritual experience for me and anyone who shares the stage with me feels it.

“It’s funny, I’ve gone full circle,” she continues. “When I started music was fun, a hobby, but after The Cranberries became so successful it stopped being fun…it wasn’t fun at all. And then I got busy with my family and it’s come back to being fun, a hobby, and that’s the best place for me to be to enjoy singing and what I’m doing.”

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Among Zombies, I CONFESS
Source: Rolling Stone (spanish)
Translated from spanish by Irish Girl
Date: june 2007

Reached fame with the Irish band The Cranberries. It was rumored that she would try it alone. Years has past, tours, childbirths ( three ) and a going down to her hell ( depression, anorexia, isolation and so on ). With Juan Pablo II blessing, Dolores O’Riordan ( 1971 ) returns with Are you listening? and starts her tour in Barcelona ( 29th May, Razzmatazz ): “Spanish fans shout me Lola at the concerts”.

 

Do you know what does “Dolores” mean in Castilian?
-Yeah, of course, calmness or loneliness, isn’t it? (*)

 

What is what you hate the most in interviews?
-When journalists start questions with “once you said…” or “I’ve read that…”

 

Well! I’ve read that you repeled a role in “Titanic”.
-Are you crazy? Someone must have put it on the Internet, but it’s completely false.

 

And what about your disagreeable polemics with your compatriot The Corrs? Also a rumor?
-They are adorable! I even know their parents. And my daughter is a superfan of theirs. Nothing, another lie.

 

Where are all of your piercings? You had a lot.
-I took them away. They are very bad for chakra, causing energy’s dispersions.

 

With this look, dark with long hair, you look like Courtney Cox, Monica in “Friends”.
-My husband says it. One day in Toronto, a guy came near me thinking I was her and asked me for an autograph.

 

Are you the richest woman in Ireland?
-I don’t think so. In any case it would be Enya. She is lining (*)

 

But you’ve sold more than 30.000.000 of albums!
-Really? I didn’t know it.

 

You should talk with your accountant more often.
-I still look at the costs when I go to the super. One day I bought a tshirt of 150 euros and I felt fatal.

 

By the look of things, you’re a dancing, in spite of that rare things, epileptics, that you did with The Cranberries.
-I’m good in Irish dancing. I learnt it when I was a child, at school, like when you’re young in Spain and you dance the typicall dance there, tango, isn’t it?

 

That’s Argentinian.
-Then, salsa.

 

That’s from caribbean countries.
-Flamenco? I love those spoted dresses (*)

 

In your career’s peak, you had a huge breakdown…
-We spent years touring and I couldn’t sleep. I slept 3 or 4 hours in a day. My brain didn’t work. I woke up in place where I didn’t remember how did I arrived to, opened what I thought it was the bathroom’s door and I was in a hotel’s vestibule with just my underwear…

 

—————-
* “Dolores”- In Castilian, “Dolores” means pain ( physical and psycological ) or sorrow.
* “lining”- in Spain we use that word to speak about people who is very rich, but I don’t know if that’s the most correct word in English.
* “spoted dresses”- she is speaking about our typicall “trajes de flamenca” ^^ women wear them in April’s Fair, they are spoted and in lots of colours. I made a drawing for her where she was dressed in that way, with Irish flag colours I bought this magazin too and read this, and, in this way, she would remember Seville.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Source: unknown
Date: June 13, 2007
Author: Mike Fitzpatrick

O’Riordan’s made an impressive return with her new album, ‘Are You Listening?’ Former Lead Vocalist For The Cranberries Preparing For U.S. Tour

These days, there are several artists from previous eras attempting to raise their respective profiles phoenix-like, from the ashes of past glories.

Whether at the height of their careers they were lionized or lampooned is irrelevant, for 2007 seems, hitherto, the year of the musical comeback.

With acclaimed acts such as The Police, The Eagles, Genesis and Van Halen all planning tours and recording new material, and Bryan Ferry, Rage Against The Machine, Tina Turner and even Fats Domino all spotted performing live in recent weeks, it perhaps came as little surprise then, that Dolores O’Riordan, one-time lead vocalist with The Cranberries, had decided to parade her vocal talents once more before the public eye.

O’Riordan’s impressive return with her first solo album, ‘Are You Listening?’, is a full decade since she experienced worldwide success with The Cranberries, therefore suggesting that she is drifting towards unfamiliar, perhaps even perilous waters. Fans of the singer need not fear however, for the album, inspired mostly by events in her personal life, some heartbreaking (the illness and subsequent death of her mother-in-law), others joyful (the birth of her third child, Dakota), is a striking return to form by the vocalist. “My mother-in-law died of cancer shortly after I left The Cranberries, which was devastating. It was like watching a beast attack from the inside out, so the song ‘Black Widow’ is a metaphor inspired by that. At the other end of the spectrum ‘Apple’ was written about my husband and ‘Ordinary Day’ reflects the birth of my third baby, Dakota.”

On the singer’s website (www.doloresoriordan.ie), she says; “Once the first 7 songs were penned, we went into the studio and had the musicians record first. Then we took it from there. We didn’t rush it. In total, the writing and recording was a four-year period. The album was an awakening for me in my life - a journey that I completed. It’s like I crossed a bridge, which is a great new plateau to be on. My life is so different to how it was 10 years ago and there’s a great sense of acceptance. It’s a very exciting time to be releasing music again too. Song-writing is truly coming back.”

Other stand-out tracks on the album include; ‘In The Garden’, ‘Loser’ and ‘Watch the Stars’, tracks she plays alongside some ‘fantastic musicians, a great bass player, a stellar drummer and an immaculate guitarist’.

Having joined the Limerick-based Cranberries when she was eighteen, O’Riordan spent thirteen years and five albums with bandmates Noel Hogan, Mike Hogan and Fergal Lawlor, before going on hiatus in 2003, allowing her to enjoy family life with husband Don, and to raise the couple’s children, Donny, Taylor Baxter, Molly and Dakota Rain.

The album, released earlier this month, followed ‘Ordinary Day’, the first single taken from the recording, an upbeat tune not entirely dissimilar to her earlier work with The Cranberries, and precedes a North American tour, which begins in July. The Irish Examiner caught up with Dolores O’Riordan recently, where she spoke of her love of music, her family life, and how it feels to be back once more in the public eye. Being out of the limelight for several years, she’s clearly excited to be embarking on this latest stage of her career, the solo aspect. “I’d a good break, and I’ve the hunger back, the whole vibe is back. Most of the material (for the new album) was written in Canada. In winter, there’s four feet of snow there. It’s very cold, but very inspiring. I have a piano in my house, and I use the weather, the ever-changing climate to inspire me while writing,” she claimed.

Fans will be able to see Dolores O’Riordan on tour in July (Photocall)

Her hiatus from the rock star lifestyle was clearly a welcome break, and though satisfied to be back making music once more, she is at once both relaxed and raring to go. “It was the first time since I was a teenager, being a normal human being, away from being an entertainer. There was no pressure. I wanted to challenge myself, to see if I could be a normal mother. It was such a cool experience. I just wanted that normality. I took a break from the music and entertainment industry for the first time in my life (since joining The Cranberries),” she claimed.

Having had children, things ’slow down a little bit’, and after the group released its greatest hits album, O’Riordan felt it was “the right time to switch off. I loved the whole idea of not being contractually bound. I kind of became myself again.”

The music scene in general however, has changed a great deal while she’s been away. “The emphasis is not on CDs anymore, it’s more on Ipods. It’s always changing, when we were teens, it went from vinyl to cassette. Good music is good music though.”

This current wave of recent publicity however, is not her first return to the spotlight in recent times. Before the release of the album, eagle-eyed music fans may have noticed a cameo appearance by the singer, in the Adam Sandler/Kate Beckinsale movie, ‘Click’, where she performed the signature Cranberries hit, ‘Linger’ in one scene.

Of her cinematic venture, she told us: “Adam (Sandler) is a big fan apparently. It was a blast, we spent ten days (on location). There’s a lot of waiting around for your scene. It’s a good laugh, and very interesting behind the scenes. Every morning, we’d three and a half hours doing make up, it makes you aware of so many different forms of art.”

Of a future in acting however, she said: “Maybe when I’m older, if it felt good at the time. I did like the whole experience, but you’d have to move lock, stock and barrel to Los Angeles.”

A move she’s not fully tempted by, given the fact that with stepson Donny now in his teens, and the rest of her brood growing up, relocating to LA could prove to be a tumultuous maneuver. Recording the album, she says, she “had a great time experimenting,” although as refrained from listening to other music. “I completely pulled myself out. When I’ve been recording myself, I tend not to (listen to music). At home, I listen to Led Zeppelin, Morrissey, when the kids are in bed, but my husband and I have very different musical tastes, so we rarely agree on what to listen to!!” Dolores’ husband, Don Burton, works within the music business himself, having once managed Duran Duran.

With ‘Ordinary Day’, currently doing the rounds on radio playlists on either side of the Atlantic, what is it that chose that track over the others on the album, to release first? “I think that that one kind of has a nice, acoustic, breezy, uplifting swing to it. I think it’s a good song to come out with first. Plus, it’s also got (a positive message). It’s uplifting. To be honest, it’s very seasonal, as well I think, it’s got the sunshine in it, it’s got this time of the year in it,” she claimed in a recent interview.

The album, the accomplished singer/songwriter’s first set of new material for four years, was co-produced by Youth and Dan Brodbeck, and engineered by Rich Chycki, and was written and recorded between the singer’s homes in Canada and Dublin. Youth, who worked on ‘Apple’ and ‘Ordinary Day’, is an acclaimed producer, previously working alongside The Verve, U2, Paul McCartney, Embrace and Primal Scream.

“He certainly brought his own vision to the table and softened the tracks without affecting their integrity or passion,” enthuses O’Riordan. It’s like she was never away.

‘Are You Listening?’ is available at all good music outlets.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Source: www.currychips.com
Author:
Patrick Steven Waechter
Date: June 5, 2007

Four years after breaking with The Cranberries, Dolores O’Riordan is back on the scene. With her new album, ”Are You Listening?,” we can only hope that the answer is yes. Her latest features some familiar sound qualities of The Cranberries, but perhaps with a fuller and more mature flavor. Dolores took a few minutes out of her drive through Paris to speak with 411 Magazine.

411 Magazine: Who were your childhood heroes?

Dolores O’Riordan: I looked up a lot to Elvis Pressley. I thought Patsy Cline was great. I liked Frank Sinatra. Johnny Cash. All that kind of stuff. I thought they were all pretty cool when I was a kid. Of course, when I got into the teens, I started to develop my own taste… I got really into Depeche Mode and The Cure, and then R.E.M. and all that that stuff.

What motivated you to go solo?

What happened was that I’d been in The Cranberries for fifteen years. A huge chunk of my life was taken up. It was a chapter of my life, or maybe even a few chapters. When I finished, the greatest hits came out. So, I left the band and I told them I was going to go on a journey where I was going to discover who I was without The Cranberries. I went off into the forest and went out there just being a person and a mother and a wife and a daughter for four years. I was trying to find out what I maybe would have lost over those years as a part of the rat race of being famous. I just wanted to experience real life, some grounding. I really enjoyed that grounding and songwriting started to become a hobby then. Then, I moved back to Ireland and the kids started to go to school and I got the album together.

You have three little ones, no? How are things at home?

Actually, I have four because I have a stepson as well. But I hate to say step. We have four children. Things are great, actually. Very lovely and busy. It’s very nice, because I remember when I left and went off with The Cranberries I wrote about missing my family, but I’m not missing them.

Mother-to-mother, what advice would you impart to Britney Spears?

Well, I think that really she has to go through what she’s going through, because this is something that’s very important for her to find herself. She has had a very difficult journey. I went through similar stuff
when I was quite young. Becoming famous is a very very difficult thing. You go through all of these things and at the end of the day it makes you stronger, stronger, stronger… you hope, anyway. I think she’ll get through it, though. She’s a strong one.

Your album has been my perfect rainy day anti-depressant lately, as it seems to rain nonstop here in Florida. Who do you listen to on days like those?

Have you gotten the new Snow Patrol? It’s a really beautiful album. They’re from Ireland as well. But oh my god, you’ll love ‘em.

My favorite song on your album is ”When We Were Young.” Is that a song about fighting the past?

It’s kind of like when you have little ones, you become aware that they’re in a kind of a headspace. And they’ll never be able to get it back when they hit ten, then twelve, then the teens… and the angst… and suddenly they’re on the next level. In a way, when you’re a kid, you have no stress, because all you have to do is worrying about dressing yourself. I’m just looking back on when I was a kid and saying ”thanks mom, thanks for doing all you did” and hoping my own kids love and appreciate me the same.

”Ecstasy” is another standout song. ”Look, you made me do this to myself.” Sounds like a complicated trip.

Really. It’s kind of about depression. And suicide. And drug addiction. And escapism. Trying to escape from pain, eternal pain. Everybody has a different journey, and it’s never perfect. People always end up with baggage, issues, pain. You can run, but you can’t hide. You do have to face it. But some people can’t face it, so they just leave. It’s very important to open up to other humans when you’re going through stuff, to never be ashamed of what you feel. You need to open up and share it because it’s only then that you get to the next level.

You’re getting ready for a U.S. tour. Will you revisit songs of the Cranberries?

Oh yeah. I play all the old stuff, because people like that, you know what I mean. Those songs, ”Zombie,” ”Linger,” all of them… I played ”Zombie” at my last show and there was one girl who cried straight through it. She was really releasing, and just kind of let it all out. I love playing live. It’s so nice to see what the songs mean to the people out there.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Former Cranberries frontwoman Dolores O’Riordan performs at the Fillmore at the TLA on July 13 with her four-member band. During her years with the Cranberries, O’Riordan, 35, helped the band sell more than 40 million records between 1993 and 1999. The group, which released four albums during that time, had it’s biggest hit single with 1994’s “Zombie.” This month, O’Riordan embarks on her first U.S tour in more than 5 years to plug her just released solo debut album, “Are You Listening?” The records earned raves as a striking return, “With angular chords and O’Riordan’s distinctively powerful vocals.” Written and recorded over 4 years, the album is largly inspired by personal experience. Her name, speaking by phone from greece, said she “Didn’t feel any pressure at all” in making the CD. “The more success you have, the more pressure you aquire.” She says. “The Cranberries couldn’t couldn’t do another ‘Linger’ or ‘Dreams,’ because you can’t really do the same thing twice. But after I stepped away from all that, and just focused on being a fulltime mom, music became a hobby to me again, and the pressure disappeared. “Music then was truely just for theraputic purposes.” The resulting effect, O’Riordan says, was “more experimental than her work with the Cranberries, while still retaining her melodic flare. For her solo tour, O’Riordan will be backed by a four member band, and plans to do a mix of old and new material. “The Cranberries stuff is great and I still like to sing those songs,” she said. “They bring back memories and it’s light-hearted now to sing them.”

Posted in Stuff, Articles |


Source: GayWired.com (Blue Streak Consulting)
Date: 23 June, 2007

Who can ever forget Dolores O’Riordan’s glorious vocal gymnastics? As the leader of mega-successful alt-pop band the Cranberries, O’Riordan took listeners on countless musical joy rides, her crystalline instrument rising slowly from a whisper to a gorgeous and cathartic emotional cry. Well she’s back with a solo album and with something to say about everything from gay marriage to her love of Freddie Mercury.
Still in awesome vocal form, O’Riordan has just released her first-ever solo album Are You Listening? on Sanctuary Records. Co-produced by Youth and Dan Broadbeck, the eagerly anticipated album is a 12-track tour de force and marks her first release in four years.

Written and recorded between her homes in Canada and Dublin, the album finds O’Riordan at her melodic best, each song a veritable hit in its own right. Punctuated with chords both muscular and agile, the songs alternate between hypnotic acoustic reveries and fiercely electric proclamations of love and strength.

Ultimately, the CD was a process inspired by personal experiences, both light and dark. ”My mother-in-law died of cancer shortly after I left the Cranberries, which was devastating. It was like watching a beast attack from the inside out, so the song ‘Black Widow’ is a metaphor inspired by that. At the other end of the spectrum is ‘Apple Of My Eye,’ which was written about my husband, and ‘Ordinary Day’ reflects the birth of my third baby, Dakota.”

Here, on the eve of her first U.S. tour as a solo artist, O’Riordan talks about the joys of being a mother, her love of Freddie Mercury, and the distant possibility of a Cranberries reunion.

This is your first release in four years. What’s the most important thing you learned emotionally during that time?

Dolores O’Riordan: I’ve learned that it’s very important to be yourself and very important to accept others for who they are?

What have you learned artistically?

DO: I’ve learned that you should never feel any inhibitions when it comes to trying new things. It’s important to experiment, to take it that extra mile.

What’s the difference for you between working as part of the Cranberries and being a solo artist?

DO: As a solo artist, the only one you are responsible to is yourself. I feel a freedom that I didn’t feel within a group. When you’re part of a band, you have to try to fit in. And when you’re up there on your own, it’s growing up time. There’s no relying on others.

There’s a wistful quality to some of your new songs. Do you mind getting older?

DO: No, I really like it, particularly since I’ve had children. You know, gravity kicks in, and you’ve got broken veins on your leg. But when you’ve had kids, they are the fruits of your journey. Children help you grow old gracefully. For me, getting famous as a teenager, it was hard to trust people. When you have a child, it helps you to open up, to be more trusting, to believe in unconditional love.

What are some of the things you lose when you get older?

DO: You become more careful, less daring. When you’re young, you jump into things. You don’t see danger. I don’t do that anymore.

The song ”Ordinary Day” definitely has a Zen quality, like you’ve accepted the way life is.

DO: That song is about a really difficult moment in my life. There was a lot darkness and death—funerals and things. The song is about feeling blessed to have a useful life, being able to bring new life back into the family. It all kind of gave me a sense of the journey of life. You really need to relax and enjoy it. It goes so quickly.

You live in part-time in Canada, where gay marriage is legal. Do you have any thoughts on that?

DO: I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that. People should be able to be able to do whatever they want with their lives. A person’s sexual preference is their own business. I love the gay community. I mean, some of the greatest geniuses—people like Freddie Mercury, for example–have been gay. It annoys me that anyone would be judgmental of someone because of their sexual preference.

Did you ever get to meet Freddie Mercury?

DO: No, I never met him, but he was such an amazing performer, a very spiritual person.

Are you and the rest of the Cranberries in touch with each other?

DO: God yes, were all friends. We call each other up to catch up.

Do you think you might ever get back together?

DO: Maybe there’ll be a reunion in 15 years time. Right now, we’re all experimenting on our own, which is what we’re meant to be doing.

Well, it was nice talking to you, Dolores.

DO: You too. Have an absolutely wonderful 2007. And good summer, love. Take care.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Posted in Dolores News |


There wasn’t official site updates for 3 weeks… But we were really busy with Site Automation. It’s very hard to update site often manually, that’s why our site updates weren’t often enough. We solved this problem.

There is a list what we have done:
Section “Articles” was reconstructed to Informational Center. It was connected with “Hot News”. Informational Center includes 4 sections: “News” and “Articles” + 2 new section “Interviews” and “Reviews”. Adding of stuff is automatized, and you can add News, Interviews, Reviews, Articles yourself! The last 6 articles, reviews and interviews, and last 10 News adds to the Main Page automatically. Read information how you can add stuff Here. It’s really simple!

Section Gallery was added by “Dolores Pictures Blog” (auto-gallery). Every registered member can add new photos now! And Gallery is common for english and russian versions of the site. Photo-adding is also very easy. Read instruction how you can add photos Here. We have already added more then 1000 Dolores’ photos (2007 year)! We ask you to take part and add photos to the blog! Let’s make the greatest collection of Dolores’ photos together!

Dolores’ Quotes at the Main Page change automatically.
Important fact: there are 2 different registration for Gallery and Informational Center. So you need to register twice, then you will have opportunity to add new photos, reviews, articles, news and interviews yourself!
We ask you help us! It’s very simple to do it now. BTW all your picture-folders, photos, articles, news, etc are signed by your name! Helping our site, you help to Cran-Dol-fans all over the world! And fans should know people who help.

Posted in Site Update |


Dolores O’Riordan (Sanctuary)Rating: 1/2Some 14 years ago, The Cranberries asked, “Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We?,” with the title of their debut album, and it turns out they could: Over the next half decade, the band from Limerick, Ireland, posted a string of hits and platinum albums.

Eventually, enthusiasm for The Cranberries dried up, and now the group’s lead singer, Dolores O’Riordan, asks, “Are You Listening?,” with the title of her debut solo release.

Good question.

Rock music is at a commercial nadir, and it’s always been a particularly tough genre for women soloists, not to mention former lead singers of bands that wore out their welcome.

But at the least, past fans of The Cranberries ought to give O’Riordan a chance. The singer who gave voice to such delicate songs as “Dreams” and “Linger” and was a woman possessed belting through “Zombie” and “Salvation” is in as strong form now as she was for all those hits.

If anyone is indeed listening, O’Riordan has several chart possibilities on her solo release, which was co-produced by Youth and is a natural progression from The Cranberries’ modern-rock sound. That includes the first two tracks - the pop-rock dreamscape “Ordinary Day” and the more urgently buzzing “When We Were Young,” both eliciting nostalgic thoughts of her band. She also revisits the structure of “Zombie” with a “Stay With Me” that alternates meditative verses with desperate chorus outbursts.

O’Riordan evocatively uses wistfulness to sharpen the hook of the slower “Apple of My Eye,” and closing track “Ecstasy” sways with an oddly effective combination of sensuality and drowsiness. Plus, despite its gimmicky premise, the sassy “Loser” - with its opening line of, “I’m sick and tired of people like you!” - packs a wallop.

However, just as The Cranberries often got bogged down in the murk, O’Riordan likewise sinks into muddy arrangements and all-around tepid tracks that water down the impact of the latter half of “Are You Listening?”

Those cuts aren’t a deal-breaker; they’re more flat than detrimental, but they won’t help O’Riordan beat the odds against her return to relevance

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Listen Up! O’Riordan’s Still a StarIT’S always a fun parlor game to dissect the sound of your favorite band when they hit the wall and the individual players release solo CDs.
Lennon and McCartney parted ways and began making music of their own, and even a casual listener heard a clear distinction between John’s bile and Paul’s sugar that made the bones of the tart pop that is the body of the Beatles work.When Mick and Keith had their infamous spat in the 1980s, the ingredients of their successful sound were laid bare in both Jagger’s contemporary yet glossy pop CDs and the gloriously ramshackle blues of Richard’s Talk Is Cheap disc.

With Are You Listening?, the new CD from Dolores O’Riordan, the secrets of the Cranberries addictive pop rock sound are laid bare for all to analyze.

What a sonic feast it is! There is not a bad track on the 13 songs that make up this disc, and many of them stand alongside the greatest hits of the Cranberries’ mid-1990s heyday

If her interviews leading up to the record’s release are to be believed, Dolores has gone to hell and back since the Cranberries have been on hiatus. Burned out from fame and paparazzi, the singer admitted to the Irish Voice a few months ago that Are You Listening? was a hard-fought trip back into the spotlight.

“Ordinary Day” is the opening track, and it is an alternative rock masterpiece brimming with the kind of optimism seen around this time of year, when the school bell ushers in the start of summer break.

“This is just an ordinary day/wipe the insecurity away/I can see that the darkness will erode/looking out the corner of my eye/I Can see that the sunshine will explode/far across the desert in the sky/beautiful girl, won’t you be my inspiration?” she sings.

“This was my first career break ever. I took four years off, and it allowed me to get my feet on the ground,” she says on the prerecorded audio files posted on her official website.

The exuberant tone on tracks like “Ordinary Day” and the sexy shuffle of “Accept Things” is truly infectious, but the good feelings are fleeting.

Over a grumbling bass line, she sings bitterly that “the summer is over and I am going through changes” on “October.”

“When We Were Young” is a wistful look at better days; it’s a caffeinated cousin to No Need to Argue’s “Ode to My Family.” O’Riordan’s trademark banshee yodel is front and center in the mix, and its ability to illicit goose bumps in the listener is as potent as ever.

“Black Widow” is a beautifully creepy track built on a tentative piano tinkle. “It’s a metaphor for cancer and watching my mother-in-law dying slowly,” she explains. “It was a slow three month experience and very sad to see any human being go through it, particularly someone so loving and kind.”

Waiting for her lover/crying in her bedroom/over and over she calls,” O’Riordan whispers. Before long, the gauzy haiku prose gives way to an ornery metallic riff that electrifies the song with spine tingling results.

It might be a metaphor for illness, but this is a relentless rocker nonetheless. If the James Bond is looking for a killer song for the next installment of their franchise, they would be well advised to name their next flick “Black Widow.”

“Human Spirit” is based on a similar piano vibe, but it is tricked out with fuzzy drums and Middle Eastern flutes that usher in an orchestral pop arrangement. “Don’t betray your lover/you will just betray yourself/is there emptiness inside?” she warns.

“‘Human Spirit’ is about respecting yourself and being true to yourself,” she explains. “In a way, the song is saying that we all have one chance and we kind of mess up when we take things for granted. It’s kind of saying you’ve gotta count all of your blessings and appreciate it.”

Cranberries fans might feel like they’ve been left in the lurch with the band in hiatus, but they should count their own blessings for the great music coming out of the band’s camp recently.

Like Dolores, Cranberries guitarist Noel Hogan has branched out into solo work. His Mono Band samples electronica, pop textures from around the world, and a revolving door of singers to create an organic band sound on their debut CD that is completely addictive.

“We left it three years ago and we agreed to go our separate ways and see where we go at some point,” he said when I asked him the question about the Cranberries’ future last month.

With his experimentations fueling the creative fire and O’Riordan’s knack for writing killer pop tunes still intact, as is evidenced on Are You Listening?, the Cranberries will be a force to be reckoned with if they decide to compete for chart gold

In the meantime, feast your ears on Dolores’ disc. It’s mature, introspective, and kicks like a mule.

Are you listening? You’d be a fool not to!

Posted in Review, Stuff |


The name rings a bell, but its only when the music kicks in, does it all make sense. O’Riordan was, of course, the lead singer of the Nineties success story The Cranberries.Once you hear that distinctive voice and trademark vocal key changes, it’s like she’s never been away, which isn’t necessarily a good thing.Her debut solo album falls short because it sounds exactly like The Cranberries of ten years ago - folk-tinged, melodic rock powered by that crystalline voice - and it’s all rather dull and uninspiring.

Her voice may have been O’Riordan’s blessing, but halfway through AYL it begins to prove her curse; I was left stretching for the volume control as she grated like fingernails being run down a blackboard.

There are some bright moments, namely Loser, which catches the attention with a razor-sharp hook, and final track, Ecstasy, is a slow burner that shows a gentler side, but it’s hardly been worth the wait.

Posted in Review, Stuff |


In an interview published by Calgary Sun Dolores was asked about her life in Canada, her inspirations for “Are you listening?” and the possibility of a The Cranberries reunion. Read it here:

Canada, specifically Northern Ontario, figures prominently in Are You Listening?, the first-ever solo record from Cranberries’ frontwoman Dolores O’Riordan.

In stores tomorrow, the 12-track album was largely written and demoed in O’Riordan’s longtime second home outside Peterborough that she shares with Candian-born husband Don Burton and their three young children. (She also has a 15-year-old stepson who lives in Toronto full-time.)

“It’s so inspiring up there,” said the Irish-born O’Riordan, 35, down the line from her other home in Dublin recently.

“It’s so peaceful that you really get kind of grounded, and you kind of forget about everything — you just become (a) human being, which is lovely.

“When you’re just in the silence of the forest it’s very inspiring, all the seasons,” she continued. “And I kind of used the seasons as a backdrop, really, to create the music and then I would put the lyrics to the music. So it was great, you know.

“There’s nothing as beautiful as the peace up north. It’s unique, the whole lifestyle, you know. I have a great romance with Canada. Any of the songs I wrote here in Ireland, I wrote them kind of by the seaside. So I’m very lucky to have the best of both worlds.”

O’Riordan, who went through a nervous breakdown and dramatic weight loss at the height of the Cranberries’ success about a decade ago, also had a lot of fodder as a solo songwriter.

She was dealing with the cancer death of her beloved mother-in-law Denise Burton (as documented in the new song Black Widow), and then the birth of her third child, Dakota, who is now 2 (celebrated on the new tune Ordinary Day).

BABY CHANGED THINGS

“She passed away, so we went through that stuff, but then when we had that new baby, it kind of turned everything around fast, you know,” said O’Riordan, whose North American tour launches July 6 in Montreal before stopping in Toronto on July 7 and Vancouver on July 23.

“(Black Widow) was kind of just about watching the whole demise, ’cause I’ve never seen that happen before and I guess it kind of opens up your eyes to how fragile life is.”

In addition, O’Riordan was processing the reality of the Cranberries, who formed in 1990 and last released an album in 2001, going on hiatus.

“We never said that it was forever,” explained O’Riordan. “Just that our personal lives kind of took over and it seemed kind of like the right thing to do, to kind of take a break. During that break I was enjoying it so much that it became a longer break and a longer break and so it became four years and I was just writing away on my time off myself, so I decided to kind of do the solo record then. It’s kind of been an experiment, I suppose.”

O’Riordan insists her Cranberries bandmates are “very cool” with her solo outing and that “we could do a reunion tour at some point in the future.”

Ultimately, Are You Listening?, which mines similar-sounding musical territory as The Cranberries, gave O’Riordan a sense of liberation, working at her own pace and on her own schedule.

“It’s really great, actually. I suppose it’s a turning point,” O’Riordan summed up.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


As the lead singer of the Cranberries, Dolores O’Riordan owned the ’90s. Named the highest-earning woman in Ireland, she married Duran Duran’s tour manager in a transparent dress, relegated her band members to separate tour buses and feverishly battled anorexia rumors. The Irish band sold more than 30 million albums before imploding after its fifth release, “Wake Up and Smell the Coffee,” in 2001. After taking six years off to raise her family, O’Riordan, 35, returns with her solo premiere CD, “Are You Listening?” She plays July 20 at the Fillmore in San Francisco.Q: How did you manage to make an album with two kids running all over the place?

A: Four, my darling.

Q: Four kids?

A: Four kids, yeah.

Q: I must have lost count.

A: I’m an Irishwoman. I always wanted a good brood.

Q: But you only took six years off.

A: Well, I have a 15-year-old stepson. I gave birth to my first child 10 years ago this year, my second is 6 and my baby is 2. I’ve been a busy bee — hatching and singing and hatching and singing.

Q: In that order?

A: Totally in that order.

Q: That makes it doubly impressive.

A: Actually, it’s kind of weird. When you have a few good kids, they play with each other. The older kids entertain the babies, they help dress each other, they like to be involved. They like to help load the dishwasher and bring their laundry up.

Q: So, basically, you put them to work.

A: It’s good for them.

Q: It doesn’t look like a bunch of kids came out of you.

A: Thanks very much. I’m flattered. It’s funny, because when you’re having the babies you don’t socialize. You’re staying at the house waiting for this little thing to grow, so I took up knitting.

Q: It’s hard to picture the woman who sang “Zombie” knitting mittens.

A: I know. It’s amazing what we go through, us women. When we get pregnant, we get all soft and motherly and we knit. It’s quite normal, actually.

Q: Did you experience any postpartum depression?

A: No, I was very lucky. I breast-fed the children, and that helps out quite a lot. It makes you feel good because your body releases all these hormones that make you relax. Also, when you’re nursing your baby, it feels like they’re back in your tummy, so it’s not that big of a departure. It’s something I was really blessed to do.

Q: Britney Spears shaved her head after she had her babies. You did it before you had yours. What was your problem?

A: I was 18 years old when I joined the ‘Berries. The first album was huge. Six million is an awful lot to sell for a bunch of kids from a small town in Ireland. It was all a big party, and then the pressure was on to make another. The next one was even bigger, so there’s even more pressure. We were living in buses for five years now. No sense of normality. No friends. No freedom. I overdid it. I was obviously losing too much weight and getting depressed from working too much. I had no normality, no sanity.

Q: How did you get through it?

A: It was just getting away from the public eye. You have to jump off the treadmill because you’re going to break your neck otherwise.

Q: Do you feel sane now?

A: Totally. You relax more in your 30s. You realize the most important thing is that you have to look after yourself and get dinner on the table. It’s grand when you find that head space.

Q: So people shouldn’t be afraid of you anymore?

A: No. I don’t bite at all.

This article appeared on page PK - 46 of the San Francisco Chronicle

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Dolores O’Riordan joined the Cranberries at age 18 and didn’t look back. Five albums and roughly 13 years later, the group took a break, allowing the 35-year-old singer to live life and enjoy her children. Gradually, O’Riordan began writing again, taking four years to piece together her first solo record, Are You Listening?, which hits stores Tuesday. O’Riordan called from Dublin, Ireland, to talk about the new album, her gradual return to the spotlight and the Cranberries’ legacy.1 Did you have any kind of road map, a grand plan for this record?No, I didn’t at all. I just wrote. Basically, I took a break from the music and entertainment industry for the first time in my life, since I was 18. As you get older, you start having kids and whatnot, it slows down a little bit. After the greatest-hits record came out and things ended between [the Cranberries] and Universal, I figured that was the right time to switch off, get completely off the merry-go-round. I loved the whole idea of not being contractually bound; I kind of became myself again.

2 What song from Are You Listening? would surprise fans?

I would say Black Widow, because it’s very different. … Stay With Me is kind of nice, because it’s darker chords but the chorus is unpredictable. I had a great time experimenting.

3 While you were away from music, did you keep listening to other bands?

Completely pulled myself out. To be honest with you, between the fourth and fifth Cranberries albums, I wasn’t listening to much, more so because you’re having babies, you’re reading What to Expect When You’re Expecting, you’re breast-feeding. And if you’re not doing that, you’re reading books about houses and kitchens and that kind of normal family stuff.

4 Were you concerned that because the musical landscape has changed so much in the last few years, you might have a tough time finding an audience?

No, I don’t worry too much about that stuff because I have a belief in the power of music, or the power of art, whatever you’re doing and if it’s good, it’s good and if it’s [junk], it’s [junk]. At the end of the day, I think that’s what really matters. If you do get something beautiful in your hands — I think people out there have ears. … The music will get out there if it’s good enough.

5 Has enough time passed for you to look back and assess what the Cranberries accomplished, what you’re proud of?

Strangely enough, it has — at the time, you’re in the eye of the storm and you don’t really realize what’s happening. I think taking the four years off was really cool because then suddenly … you’re pulling all these things out of boxes, and you’re actually looking at them. Now you’ve time to look at things, you’ve time to look at the bigger picture. … We actually did something cool.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


For Cranberry’s new drive comes to fruition “I want to keep my identity” … the former lead singer of the Cranberries, Dolores O’Riordan, has released a new album, Are You Listening? , and will begin touring again this year.

THERE was a time in the mid-1990s when hearing Dolores O’Riordan was unavoidable.

Her voice was everywhere, on the radio and in shopping centres singing and shrieking songs such as Linger and Zombie, which she wrote and performed with the Irish mega-group The Cranberries. Then, in 1996, O’Riordan had a nervous breakdown and the band, after selling 40 million albums, began to disintegrate, breaking up three years ago.

O’Riordan, 35, is now a mother of three who knits and practises yoga. The shaved head has been replaced by long dark locks.

“I don’t find much pressure in motherhood; I love being a mother,” O’Riordan said, in Sydney yesterday to promote her new solo album, Are You Listening? “It was more challenging growing up in the public eye - the fishbowl syndrome. My first son was born 10 years ago. Giving birth helped me to heal and helped me to open up and receive love.”

With such an idyllic domestic life, it seems difficult to believe O’Riordan would consider returning to the lifestyle that sent her over the brink.

Many of her songs are dedicated to family members: her children and her Canadian husband, Don Burton, the former tour manager for Duran Duran whom she met at age 19 while touring the US and married in 1994.

This year O’Riordan begins touring again, including Australia in October, but insists it will be with a different mindset. “I have been a singer and an entertainer longer than I have been a mother, and it is a big part of my identity. I want to keep my identity.

“In the four years I was at home, writing became a hobby, and that was lovely. When you are not trying and you are not stuck in a contract and you don’t think people are waiting, suddenly you get great inspiration.”

O’Riordan rarely smiles but admits it is a long way from the days when paralysis set in before going on stage with the band.

“There is no real pressure. Pressure is something we place on ourselves. When you are young you make mistakes - you sign yourself away for two or three years. It is hard to back off then.”

Posted in Stuff, Articles |


The Cranberries were never the paramount wordsmiths in the biz, but their catchy-sweet songs also never failed to iron-brand our brains - nor the adult alternative niche of the 1990s, a scene the Irish band largely and so graciously helped carve out.Lead singer Dolores O’Riordan, responsible for Cranberries tracks like “Dreams” and “Linger,” with which we have fierce love/hate relationships to this day, preserves that same elemental formula in her solo venture: primitive lyrics and a beguiling beat. O’Riordan clearly dragged some songwriting baggage into her new hurricane of haunting cries, occasionally upset by “Zombie”-like guitar crunches.The problem is not only that it’s impossible for O’Riordan to be anything but “the lead singer of the Cranberries,” but also that her evident attempt at personal poignance is turned futile by elementary and predictable rhymes. I don’t know if the boys had a hand in editing her lyrics when she wrote for the band, but perhaps their presence would have been helpful here: The songstress sinks into such methodical triteness - “As the days go by/ The apple of my eye,” “Another lonely night in December/ It is the time of year people remember” - that it doesn’t even come as much of a shock when she rhymes the word “sea” with itself. In its old age, O’Riordan’s breathy Celtic yodel reaches new heights of sermonic insight: “Don’t let life consume you/ It could eat you up inside,” she projects in all seriousness.

On the album cover, the 35-year-old looks more chic than ever, sporting sleek black hair and a pea coat - a drastic departure from her Cranberries pixie cut and tomboy garb - but, unfortunately, her craft has not undergone the same maturing process. Sorry, O’Riordan - you may know “life is more intricate than it seems,” but your art is not. And congratulations, all you fading adult contemporary radio stations - you can finally take those old Cranberries staples out of rotation for a new breed of brilliance.

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Dolores O’Riordan
Are You Listening
(Sanctuary ***)

More than five years after her band, the Cranberries, quietly disbanded, Irish songstress Dolores O’Riordan has reemerged with a solo effort worth the wait. Aside from a few artsy collaborations, O’Riordan had been keeping a low profile, working on this disc and raising her children. It’s no surprise, then, that issues related to family - love for her husband, the birth of a child - are sprinkled throughout, but the Youth-produced CD sounds more inspired than self-indulgent.

O’Riordan smartly sidesteps the overwrought, prog-rock flavorings of the end-stage Cranberries to focus on her greatest strength: a supple, strong voice that works best with melodic pop. Revved up by urgent guitars, sweeping keyboards and driving percussion - not to mention some nicely cinematic songwriting - O’Riordan takes on everything from romantic love (”Apple of My Eye”) to a death in the family (”Black Widow”) in a muscular fashion.

- Nicole Pensiero

Posted in Review, Stuff |


DOLORES O’RIORDAN
Are You Listening?
Nils van der Linden
Fri, 01 Jun 2007 Dolores scores 3/5

Although she was the last to join, it didn’t take long for Dolores ‘O Riordan to take control of The Cranberries. As their singer/chief songwriter/lyricist/keyboard player/guitarist she did virtually everything apart from clean the toilet on the tourbus. No surprise then that, despite featuring new musicians and appearing five years after her band faded away, her debut solo album sounds more than a little familiar.

But there are some small, important, changes.

That voice is still unmistakable but no longer has just two default settings: sweet and piercing. The songs still shift between innocent ballads and hard rockers that continue to recycle the grungy guitar riff introduced on ‘Zombie’, but the new backing musicians sound more dynamic and powerful. The trademark vocal gymnastics (”ooh ooh, aah aah”, “doo doo doo doo”) are still there but lyrically she doesn’t try so damn hard.

It’s probably the most striking change, with O’Riordan moving away from making brash political or social statements that just sounded stupid and ignorant (”At times of war, we’re all the losers, there’s no victory, We’ll shoot to kill and kill your lover, fine by me,” she sang so insightfully ten years ago on ‘Warchild’).

Instead she’s returned to the more personal, introspective lyrics and sense of innocence that provided the heart of The Cranberries’ never-bettered debut album. Now it’s all about relationships, emotions, birth, death and nostalgia again.

Despite its trite message of “be yourself”, bouncy first single ‘Ordinary Day’ is a sincere tribute to her youngest daughter; the sinister Tori Amos flavoured ‘Black Widow’ which explodes into full-blown yelling is about her mother-in-law’s losing battle with cancer; the familiarity of ‘Angel Fire’ is rendered irrelevant by its surprisingly inspirational yet religion-free message inspired by meeting Pope John Paul II.

And the high octane ‘When We Were Young’ is obviously about her childhood — but for the first time since 1994 O’Riordan’s lyrics are obscure enough for them to be interpreted on many levels.

So when Therapy? drummer Graham Hopkins, Whitesnake bassist Marco Mendoza and The Cranberries tour guitarist Steve Demarchi tear into ‘Stay With Me’ it’s easy to identify with the brooding tale of obsession, or understand the venom of the punchy ‘Loser’.

But this is still the same woman who preached about “their tanks and their bombs, And their bombs, and their guns”, and she can’t resist a bit of lecturing — most notably on the ill-advised Celtic-flavoured ‘Human Spirit’. “Don’t let life consume you,” she advises, “it could eat you up inside”. Thanks.

Slips like these notwithstanding ‘Are You Listening’ is a mature album that clearly reflects O’Riordan’s growth as a person, if not a musician. And, looking back at the latter days of The Cranberries, it’s certainly the best album she’s produced since ‘No Need To Argue’.

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Dolores O’Riordan is this week’s “Singer of the Week” on AskMen.com.

The site has 3 pages dedicated to Dolores, including one where they rank her “personality and talent,” “sexiness,” and “natural beauty.” Dolores got a not-too-shabby overall score of 75/100.

AskMen wrote,

Dolores can be described as cute, though hardly cute in a seemingly innocent or perky sort of way. She reminds us of that rare breed of moody, introspective-looking girls we remember from high school whose looks were accentuated by an alluring air of mystery. Her pretty, delicate features are counter-balanced by that ubiquitous stern expression on her face that actually makes her more attractive. Although we understand that guys who go for girls with a permanent smiley face won’t agree with such an assessment.

They also have an interesting quote about what motivated Dolores to finally complete her long-brewing solo album:

“Really, I think I decided to make a full album because I had buckets of songs and I thought, ‘It’s now or never,’ ’cause I’m not getting any younger.”
- Dolores O’Riordan on making her solo album.

Posted in Dolores News |


From The Times

June 20, 2007

Dolores O’Riordan

David Sinclair at Koko, NW1

The Cranberries’ slide down the greasy pole of pop was so steep during the late Nineties that it is easy to forget how big they were before that. Their most successful album, No Need to Argue, sold more than 16 million copies. The Irish group suspended activities in 2003, but it was not until last month that their singer Dolores O’Riordan released her first solo album, Are You Listening?, a title which must surely be tempting fate.

There were plenty of diehard Cranberries fans among the audience at Koko — the only British show on O’Riordan’s European tour — but what had they come to hear? The singer, now 35 and a mother of three, was obviously there to promote her own album, and performed most of the songs on it. But she wisely opted to take control of the Cranberries’ legacy as well. With the help of a four-man backing band she performed an equal number of old favourites, beginning with Zombie and ending with the group’s first hit, Dreams .

The only woman in pop to have tried out more hairstyles and colours than Madonna, O’Riordan has now opted for a dark shade and a plain, straight cut that was more office secretary than rock chick. She skipped around the stage like a pixie, her slightness of figure emphasised when she strapped on a white guitar that seemed outsized by comparison to play When You’re Gone .

Her voice remains an instrument of fierce tonal extremes but limited emotional range. She has reined in some of the harsh ululating tics that became her trademark, and there was a reflective mood to some of the new songs. “I think that we weren’t always grateful,” she sang on When We Were Young. But a stroppier attitude surfaced on Loser, a disposable indie-pop tune with a lyric full of vengeful put-downs.

In fairness, her own material generally stood up well, especially when compared with the Cranberries’ most famous song, Linger, which was the least interesting performance of the night. But it was nevertheless the hits of her old group, including a pretty version of Just My Imagination and a fast, vibrant Salvation, that carried the show.

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Dolores is back

DANIELLE O’DONOHUE, MUSIC WRITER

May 30, 2007 08:30pm

At one time in the `90s, Dolores O’Riordan was battling with Garbage’s Shirley Manson as the coolest chick in rock music.

The Irish band she fronted, the Cranberries had hits around the world with Linger, Zombie and Dreams.

In 2003 the band announced they would be taking time off to pursue other projects.

For their enigmatic frontwoman, that meant spending time thinking about things other than music; such as raising a family.

But during the time off O’Riordan found herself writing songs and is now back with her debut solo album, Are You Listening?

The Irish singer says after the Cranberries it was relief to get back to regular life.

“The writing became a hobby in the background, it took a backseat to parenthood and being a person and being a human being,” she says.

“My priorities were taking the kids to school and being a mum and being a daughter and being a sister. Just spending a lot of that time with my family that I’d probably lost a lot of, touring with the Cranberries.”

O`Riordan says inspiration for her songs comes from her day to day life and recording the new album was a much more home-grown process than any of the recording she did with the Cranberries.

“I always use my songwriting as a therapuetic kind of thing. We would work from my house and it was very relaxed, a very organic process.”

Are You Listening? (Shock) out now.

Posted in Stuff, Articles |


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Sweat. Lots of sweat. On the verge of fainting from the heat and the stuffy atmosphere. And all that for I don’t know how many hours before Dolores entered the stage. There was waiting outside the venue, there was waiting inside, there was waiting for the support acts to finish and vanish off stage. And when Dolores O’Riordan appeared the sweating kept coming but nobody cared anymore. Nobody could go back to the level where you can listen to your brain saying “I am hungry” or “I feel very hot” or “I need water”. Now it was the time for the gig.

That day was feeling like a constant twirling. Left Athens in the morning by plane, reached Orly in Paris in the early afternoon, and after we dropped our luggage at the hostel we were staying we immediately took off for ‘Le Bataclan’. Litsa and Kostas were there already since noon, right after they arrived from Brussels. Some very funny (although nasty) incidents happened outside the venue. The crowd gathered there booed us (actually tried to boo us, cause I don’t call a “booo” from 5-6 people that lasts only 4 seconds a real boo, lol) because we hadn’t stood up in the end of the queue. It’s funny cause knowing that the gig wouldn’t begin for at least 3 hours yet I think it’s irrational to suppose I’d go and wait in the back with my friends in the front. Not that I’d take advantage of it and steal other people’s place but I wanted company. Wanna blame me for that? Feel free! Anyway, there was lots of arguing there, and some so civilised French fans told on us to the security guys… How brave of them, wow! lol, just makes me laugh. The really funny thing though is that the ones that were complaining were in front of us anyway and we weren’t taking their place and in the end (after we did move to the back of the queue and got in the venue way after them), we still went to the front of the stage while they, although they got in first, went and stood in some weird places, like the left part of the stage. All this fighting for this? Anyway, enough about this, I have forgotten about it already (well, not totally, I still recall it and laugh every now and then, lol).

The support acts were okay I guess. Who cares anyway? All I cared about was when they’d get lost off the stage. And when that happened… And Dolores came on stage… Wow!

Having never seen her before live, I was really amazed. I didn’t expect to like it so much. She is so ‘petite’ and yet such a strong figure. And her face has something magical, very unique.

The concert itself was fantastic. The sound was great, her voice was almost flawless and the vibe of the crowd was splendid. Everyone (almost) was singing along to every song and we were enjoying it. Dolores seemed to enjoy it too. A lot!

The opener, Zombie, was too good to be true. It was the perfect opener for a great show. Her voice was so breathtaking and she kept letting the crowd sing and that was fun. Other highlights from The Cranberries’ songs were absolutely

I Can’t Be With You and Salvation. Everyone was going crazy with them, jumping up and down, smashing the people around them. lol, savage but also thrilling.Her ballads were mindblowing too, especially When You’re Gone. And then to the new material! I had been waiting to listen to Human Spirit live since I first heard it on that Croatian radio, but when I finally did it was surreal. That song is definitely my favourite from Are You Listening?. And then Black Widow was more than I could have imagined. I never liked that song so much, I mean I did like it but that was all. But live… it was ethereal. Her voice was like it was coming from another world. Almost haunting!Finally, Loser and October were amazing too. Everyone was screaming at the top of their lungs during those too! So fun. I only missed Accept Things, I think she should bring it in the set too.
All in all, this was a hell of a concert. Why did it have to end? Well, all good things end, and that’s how you can tell that they were good, that’s how you learn to appreciate them. And there is always something better coming up… In this case? The gigs in Thessaloniki and Athens, woohoo!!

P.S. See you there!

http://www.lastfm.ru/music/Dolores+O%27Riordan/+journal

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Album review by: dani_r

Posted: Wednesday, May 30

Dolores O?€™Riordan was the haunting voice of The Cranberries through the 90?€™s and she continues to haunt through the 2007 with her new album ?€?are you listening??€™

I?€™ve always been doubtful of comeback albums, and with good reason, but Dolores O?€™Riordan makes a fine effort and is sure to please old fans, while attracting a few new ones.

After leaving The Cranberries, though it may seem Dolores O?€™Riordan disappeared into oblivion she had actually been collaborating with quite a few artists. Her song ?€?Black Widow?€™ from ?€?are you listening??€? was even meant to appear on the Spiderman 2 soundtrack, but was pulled out last minute. Her album shows no sign of having abandoned music over the years as her voice is fresh as ever.

?€?Are you listening??€? is overall a fine album. Completely listenable and soothing, yet it fails to contain any real stand out tracks. Her first single ?€?ordinary day?€? is a nice pop tune, but nothing that catches the ear and after a while loses its appeal.

I was expecting a more demure record considering it has been a while since The Cranberries and perhaps she would go in a new direction, but Dolores O?€™Riordan belts em` out like she was never gone. ?€?In the garden?€? is an interesting song, the music screams at you while she belts out that echoing voice. ?€?Human spirit?€?, ?€?angel fire?€?, ?€?ecstasy?€? and especially ?€?october?€? are beautiful tracks, defiantly some of the nicer songs in comparison.

Listening to Dolores O?€™Riordan it?€™s hard not to compare her new effort to The Cranberries. The album in all has a very similar sound, yet lacks the commercial appeal they once had, though that could be a good thing. Much like her lyrics for The Cranberries, Dolores O?€™Riordan falls into the trap of rhyming lyrics which many deplore and I find hard to listen to. In ?€?accept things?€? (also not a favourite of mine) she sings ?€?”I think you pretend, that you are my friend” and this continues through most of her songs. She lacks any real emotional depth in her lyrics but her voice and the music behind it almost compensates for it.

While ?€?are you listening?€? is an admirable effort for a debut solo album, and is very nice to listen to, it lacks the quality of a standout album. For fans it should surely please and for the new listeners I recommend it. But if you don?€™t like Dolores O?€™Riordan you can always turn back to The Cranberries for some pleasing stuff.

http://thedwarf.com.au/nd/content/view/full/62970

Posted in Review, Stuff |


June 6, 2007

By Lara de Matos

David Gresham
Rating: **

Hers was the distinct melancholic lilt that set The Cranberries apart from their alternative-rock compatriots and ultimately catapulted the band into mainstream success.

Now, more than a decade after their hit album, No Need Argue, was released and four years since the group all went their separate ways, lead singer, Dolores O’Riordan, has gone solo.

But be warned: if you’re expecting the same kind of brilliance she brought us during her Cranberries days, you’re bound to be disappointed. The Irish folk-like melodies that defined the group are still very much a feature of Dolores’s solo sound, and that’s part of the problem: if you’re going to go it alone, it’s generally a given that you should make an effort to separate yourself from the kind of material you were producing while with the band, otherwise it’s a pretty pointless endeavour.

And if you were hoping that the lyrics would afford some sort of, er, Salvation - don’t hold your breath . With words that read: “And with my heart in my hand, and with my hand upon my heart”, the album is one long stretch of cringe-worthy clich?©s.

It’s hard to believe this is the same woman who wrote the lyrics for Linger, which was one of the band’s most popular tunes ?€¦

Clearly this Cranberry is all out of juice!
http://www.tonight.co.za/index.php?fArticleId=3869800&fSectionId=348&fSetId=251

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Image(Sanctuary/Shock)

Back from limbo after all these years must be a Zombie

Back in the 90s, Ireland’s Cranberries ruled the airwaves with million-selling records and a string of radio-friendly singles. But after their fifth album in 2001, they faded from view. That it’s taken this long for lead singer Dolores O’Riordan to sort out her first solo album wouldn?t normally augur well for its contents. Yet, even after such a time away, not only is her very distinctive yodel-tinged, airy vocal delivery still unmistakable, she also wraps it in a melodic pop with clear links to the sound of her old band. And, even if she still hasn’t found a way around some of the hurdles of the past, namely her often lame lyrics, it comes together better than I for one was expecting. Sure there are dawdlers (Accept Things) and dirges here (the mis-named Ecstasy). But from the harder guitars and more insistent tone of In The Garden to the Sinead O’Connor-lite feel of Black Widow and the 80s synths-guitars meld of October, O’Riordan mixes it up reasonably well. So, faults aside, when it works, it recaptures the soaring sincerity that the Cranberries did so well, but shifts focus enough to show she doesn’t need them anymore.

***

BILL HOLDSWORTH

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Sun 6 May 2007

After a personal breakdown and the break-up of...

After a personal breakdown and the break-up of her band The Cranberries, Dolores O’Riordan is returning with a new album.

Calm after the storm

CHITRA RAMASWAMY

THERE was a point in the Nineties when Dolores O’Riordan was Britain’s biggest female rock star. The lead singer of the Cranberries was one of Ireland’s richest artists’  estimated to have a bank balance and was recognised the world over for her voice, an ethereal howl which was revered and re-viled in fairly equal measure. The band had won numerous awards, sold millions of records and O’Riordan had sung with Luciano Pavarotti and re-duced Princess Diana to tears with a performance of ‘Linger’, one of their biggest hits.

Then came the classic crash-and-burn chapter of the fable a tale of non-stop touring, overwork, depression, anorexia and a very public nervous breakdown. After years of struggling with fame and fortune, O’Riordan left the Cranberries in 2003 and the quartet quietly disbanded.

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?€?You can’t see the forest for the trees when you’re in the midst of it,’ she says of those years as she sits in the Four Seasons in London’s Knightsbridge. ‘I was in the eye of the storm and I couldn’t get out. When I was young I was very hungry for fame. I was a workaholic and I enjoyed it, but then I overdid it. It became too difficult to stop.?€?

Now, after a four-year hiatus, the 35-year-old has returned with her first solo album, Are You Listening? Musically, it picks up where the Cranberries left off, with its mainstream and folk- edged guitar rock, though O’Riordan claims she experimented more on this album. ‘There were no limitations, no band waiting for me and no contractual obligations, so it was like having a brand new canvas and new paintbrushes she says. I’d never done it like that before. It was just what the doctor ordered, much better than churning out an album every two years. It’s better to take four years out and bring out a quality bunch of songs.?€?

O’Riordan often speaks like someone who has been through a lot of therapy. It was her psychotherapist who many years ago, when she was battling depression in the Cranberries and her weight had dropped to six stone, told her to get out of the limelight, fast, and go where nobody knew her. It’s advice that she has continued to take ever since, disappearing along the coast outside Dublin, where she lives with her husband and three children, or into the forests in Ontario, Canada, where they go for part of the year.

‘At the end of the day everybody likes to switch off’ she says. ‘But if you’re really full-on, it’s hard to. I think that over the years I’ve found a way of doing it and it’s about stepping away for long periods and being quiet.?€? As for being back on the music scene, she doesn’t feel wary at all. ‘I was 18 when I started this and I’ve been doing it longer than I’ve been a mother’she says. ‘Also, I know my limitations and boundaries.’

In the sleeve notes for Are You Listening?, she very publicly apologises for my lack of contact, and how I have isolated myself?€?, adding but these are the only means whereupon I can grow?. Likewise, her conversation is peppered with therapy’s clichs, heart-felt though they are, such as ?€?what doesn’t kill you will only make you stronger?€?, and there is much talk of emotional journeys and learning curves. She may be earnest but she has also managed to turn things around for herself.

O’Riordan is wary and intense, her handshake limp, her green eyes fixed on me. Over the course of the interview, this diminutive, softly spoken woman gradually becomes much less jittery. Strangely, it is when she is talking about her personal life that she is most relaxed. Growing up in Limerick as the youngest of seven and now with 28 nieces and nephews family is very important to her and much of the conversation finds its way back to her children, her pregnancies and her husband, who is also her manager and flits around in the background while we speak.

O?€™Riordan used to have a reputation for being something of a livewire with the press, who in turn have been pretty vitriolic about her in the past, more so perhaps than towards fellow Irish acts such as The Corrs or, say, Sinead O’Connor. Even now, when someone’s voice is described as resembling O’Riordan’s, it is often not meant as a compliment.

‘When I was younger and really famous, the inevitable backlash came and I would get people coming to talk to me who had very negative energy or were just mean’? she says. ‘Now that I’m older I realise people are people and we’re all different and it doesn?€™t mean they don’t like me.’

O?€™Riordan began writing again six months after leaving the band, while she was caring for her mother-in-law. Diagnosed with cancer, her mother-in-law was given six months to live though she lasted 10, O’Riordan says with a wan smile“ and her deteriorating health ended up being part of the reason for O’Riordan leaving the band. At that time the priority was to look after her. I knew if I was going to Ontario that it made more sense to tell the Berries not to wait for me. I told them to go on with their lives and do something else.?€?

In the evenings, O’Riordan would walk and write, for therapeutic reasons at first, but soon whole songs started to emerge. One of the darker tracks on the album, ‘Black Widow’, on which O’Riordan yodels “Feelin’ lonely. Feelin’ lonely/ And she dies, and she dies? is about this time. It’s not all grief and sadness though, and on the new single, Ordinary Day’, O’Riordan celebrates the birth of her third child, Dakota, and extols the healing power of the simple life. Be-cause the album spans four years of her life, it runs the gamut of her experience.

When she wasn’t writing and co-producing the album, or flying in backing musicians, O’Riordan volunteered in a school, planted vegetables, learned to paint and looked after her children. ‘The Cranberries were just so massive and I was so young that I had no life experience before this. I went from a classroom to fame overnight, while all my friends went to college and did normal things. In the four years that I had off, I went away and tried to reclaim what I lost.’

http://scotlandonsunday.scotsman.com/review.cfm?id=700422007

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Article Launched: 04/24/2007 12:08:47 PM PDT

Cranberries lead singer Dolores O’Riordan poses as promoting her solo album in Hong Kong, Tuesday April. 24, 2007. (Associated Press)

HONG KONG (AP) ?€” Dolores O’Riordan of The Cranberries says a reunion of the Irish band is possible, although for now she’s enjoying her solo work.

The 35-year-old singer was in Hong Kong on Tuesday to promote her new album, “Are You Listening?”

O’Riordan said she’s happy with the album because it was completed in a relaxed setting. She worked on it over four years while she was spending time with her family, even volunteering at her children’s school.

“A lot of these songs just came from day-to-day experiences. And it was a very natural, kind of organic process,” she said.

Asked if The Cranberries, whose last studio album was released in 2001, will work together again, O’Riordan said: “Maybe in the future.”

But asked whether she missed working with her band mates, she said, “Not yet. This is pretty good fun.”

O’Riordan said her new album has a more experimental sound than her work with The Cranberries because she tries different instruments and beats.


http://www.presstelegram.com/music/ci_5740172

Posted in Stuff, Articles |


Source: TheLondonPaper
Author: Rob Grainge
Date: May 02, 2007

The lead singer of hit band The Cranberries, Dolores O’Riordan, has returned with her debut solo album, Are You Listening? Here the Irish songstress reveals the reasons behind The Cranberries’ hiatus and how she’s come a long way from gigging in a bread van.

What made you want to record a solo album?
I just arrived at that point in my life and hit the 30 mark. I’d done the five [albums] and greatest hits with The ­Cranberries and it seemed like the obvious thing to do. We’re all friends so there’s no bitterness and we could even do a ­reunion at some stage.

What can we expect from solo Dolores?
It’s a lot more experimental than anything else I’ve done before. It has some dark ­moments but also some bright and positive ones.

How different was it ?­making an album without the rest of the band?
This one was definitely more challenging, although time was my on my side it took me four years. I wrote 30 tracks and we picked 12. I tried to do it properly and be really happy with it.

What are you listening to at the moment?
It’s really sad, I have an iPod but I don’t even know how to download. My husband downloaded two yoga CDs for me but I’m caught in a time warp. It’s because of ?­having kids, I don’t listen to much if I’m not making it.

How did you end up as the wedding singer in Adam Sandler’s film, Click?
He just phoned me up and said that he and his wife’s favourite song was Linger [by The Cranberries]. He said he’d written this movie and it was important to have this song in the wedding scene. He’d lost his dad about a year before and he writes an awful lot from experience. I was there for ten days, flown out, had my own trailer, real first-class treatment. I kept thinking that I was dreaming. It was all a bit surreal.

How did you become the The Cranberries’ singer?
I auditioned. They played a few songs for me, I played some songs for them. My wardrobe at the time was very dodgy, I was wearing pink pants and a frilly blouse and I really didn’t look the part, but when I sang I could tell they were impressed.

Did you ever guess how ?­successful you’d become?
We hadn’t a clue. If anything , we were very lucky. We just started working
Ireland and going around in a bread van. One of the lads’ parents was a bread man. So we’d drive the van around surrounded by equipment and sitting on pans in the back.

Did you do a couple of deliveries and then go and play a gig?
No, but we used to eat the bread because we’d spent all our money on beer and we’d be starving. So there we were doing the beer and bread in the back of the van. The bread was always really fresh as well. Those were the days.

Dolores O’Riordan’s new album “Are You Listening?” is out now .

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


It’s been a while since we?€™ve heard that instantly recognisable voice. Or has it? Dolores O’Riordan, the sultry songstress whose ethereal vocals put The Cranberries on the map, is back with an immediately likeable solo effort.

Ordinary Day is a folksy, radio-friendly pop track which is safe to the point of insulation from criticism. Guitar-driven and centred around a rousing chorus, O’Riordan continues to perform with her definitive poise and conviction. Hardly groundbreaking stuff, but listenable enough.

However, O’Riordan’s voice is no longer that instantly recognisable. While those sultry, ethereal pipes have not deteriorated in the slightest, she is no longer untouchable as the market she is trying to occupy has become intensely saturated. Worse yet, it is scattered with women who are more inventive songwriters and performers.

The onslaught of chanteuses whose voices can be described by words synonymous with ‘angelic,’ ‘hypnotic,’ ‘lush’ or ‘heavenly’ over the past few years means that sounding likeable is not enough. For O’Riordan to compete with the Feists and Kate Havneviks of the world, she’ll need much more adventurous material. Regrettably, Ordinary Day fails to deliver in this respect.

- Alvin Chan

Posted in Review, Stuff |


It’s been four years since ’90s modern rock darlings the Cranberries went on hiatus. It’s taken the years since for lead singer Dolores O’Riordan to record solo bow “Are You Listening?,” due May 15. Launch single “Ordinary Day” showcases a tempo closer to pop classic “Linger” than delectable screamer “Zombie,” with its hypnotic harmonies and steady acoustic instrumentation. The lyric (”Always be yourself along the way/Living through the spirit of your dreams”) is a guidebook for O’Riordan’s third daughter, Dakota. Adult top 40 has a prizewinner here: familiar voice, female-friendly message and opulent melody. An esteemed, handsome return. Chuck Taylor

http://www.billboard.com/bbcom/content_display/reviews/singles/e3i53270960c7c27f1c67066cc0c2989d1d

Posted in Review, Stuff |


It’s been a long period of quiet for Dolores O’Riordan, the lead singer of the Cranberries. Her band quietly disbanded after the 2001 release of Wake Up and Smell the Coffee and although she didn’t disappear, O’Riordan surely wasn’t overly active, popping up on music by Angelo Badalamenti and Zucchero, but primarily devoting herself to family affairs before she set out to record her solo debut with producer Youth in 2006. Released the following year, Are You Listening sidesteps the turgid proggy inclinations of latter-day Cranberries albums while also avoiding the awkward attempts at hard rock which plagued some of the band’s midperiod albums. So, it returns O’Riordan to her strengths: melodic, atmospheric, mildly brooding pop. But Are You Listening isn’t exactly a dead-ringer for Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We. Youth gives this album drama, grandeur and muscle, so it sounds positively cinematic where early Cranberries were quiet and insular. Of course, this sense of scale is only appropriate for the modern-day Dolores O’Riordan, who has long been a star but where that sense of confidence could turn indulgent on latter-day Cranberries albums, she’s now relatively humble and direct, singing songs about family, faith and nostalgia that sound relatable to fans that have grown up with her and are also facing similar issues. And that’s why Are You Listening is a success as a solo debut: it doesn’t resurrect O’Riordan’s earliest work as much as reconnect with it and she hasn’t sounded this purposeful or, has made a record this satisfying, since the days of Linger. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine , All Music Guide

http://www.artistdirect.com/nad/store/artist/album/0,,4125511,00.html

Posted in Review, Stuff |


- Dolores O’Riordan’s solo album, Are You Listening, has been a long time coming. Though The Cranberries broke up following their 2001 album, Wake Up and Smell the Coffee, O’Riordan’s vocal stylings didn’t retreat into the woodwork. She collaborated with artists in other countries such as Germany’s Jam and Spoon and Italy’s Zucchero. But for her long awaited solo attempt, she sought production help from Youth, who has also produced albums for The Verve and U2. O’Riordan’s sweet and resonate voice will delight fans who have missed her songbird timbre.

«Ordinary Day» has both O’Riordan’s voice and the guitar echo in the intro. Then, drum work enters the mix as she expounds how she has found her muse in one person, and how they shouldn’t be so careless with their affection, with lyrics like, «This is just an ordinary day. Wipe the insecurities away. I can see that the darkness will erode. Lookin’ out the corners of my eye. I can see that the sunshine will explode. Far across the desert in the sky. Beautiful girl. Won’t you be my inspiration. Don’t you throw your love around. What in the world, what in the world could ever come between us? Beautiful girl. Beautiful girl. I’ll never let you down.»

On «When We Were Young,» O’Riordan talks about how things seem so different when one’s age isn’t such a high number. Experiences seemed more defined, and the sensations were heightened, as O’Riordan croons lines like, «Funny how things just tasted better when we were young. When we were young. Funny how things just seemed so easy when we were young. It’s been a long day. It’s been a long day. It’s been a long day. It’s been a long day. I wanna get out. I wanna go home, I wanna get out. I wanna go home.» It seems O’Riordan is hankering for a time when things were simpler, and how she felt wasn’t so sad. Her voice as she utters each line reeks of despair and need, and listeners might think back to their younger days as they listen to this song.

«In the Garden» has piano in the intro which varies greatly from the previous tracks. On this song, O’Riordan croons about a child frolicking in her garden and how her disguise has broken down in O’Riordan’s eyes, with lines like, «I see you playin’ in the garden. Outside my window. Oh. You’re like your father. I see right through you. Just like your father. I thought I knew you. It’s a panic. You can’t go here. You can’t go. You can’t go here.» The song starts off with a slow tone, but then O’Riordan becomes overwrought and the instrumentation gets kicked up considerably into a frenzied pace. It seems O’Riordan is not comfortable with this revelation and is expressing it in a song that shows off her disposition as calm and collected at first, which then becomes distraught and scared.

Dolores O’Riordan’s Are You Listening will please Cranberries fans, and while doing that, might make listeners compare the situations O’Riordan is talking about to their own lives.

Reviewer: Sari N. Kent
Reviewer’s Rating: 9
Reader’s Rating: 10.00
Reader’s Votes: 1

http://thecelebritycafe.com/cd/full_review/12824.html

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Tuesday April 24, 2007 @ 04:30 PM

by Phil Villeneuve

Dolores O’Riordan is a very different woman from when most of the world knew her as the vocal and songwriting powerhouse in The Cranberries.
When I ask her over the phone from her Canadian log cabin if she was comfortable and warm she replied, “Yes! I’m sitting here in a nice four-poster bed in my cottage with the heat and a warm blanket.
I’m a sensible woman.”

 Dolores O'Riordan Dolores O’Riordan


A sensible woman, indeed. O’Riordan is now a mother of three, a wife to Duran Duran’s tour manager (Canadian native Don Burton), and now, due to The Cranberries indefinite hiatus, she’s a solo artist.
Sporting long, jet black hair, O’Riordan is ready to tackle music on her own. Through depression, nervous breakdowns and a band desperately trying to keep it together, O’Riordan has been through a lot since auditioning for The Cranberries in 1990. And while the rock star title still suits her with new album Are You Listening? these days “mammy” is just as applicable.
“Yeah, my kids love my music,” O’Riordan gushes. “They don’t really remember The Cranberries at all ’cause they were young, so they’re finding out now, coming home from school and they’re like, ‘Mammy, are you like, in a band?’
“But I play it down a lot. I’m just mammy to them and that’s cool because you kind of wonder when they get to 16 and 17, will they be saying, ‘Oh! You’re cack.’ So it’s nice that they like it now, but we don’t really play it too much around them because it’s our work and we try to keep life very normal.”
O’Riordan seems to have fit well into normal life since leaving the band. She and her husband split their time between a farm in
Dublin and the Ontario cottage. Now writing and composing on her own (though she still talks to the boys back home), O’Riordan views the world in a more optimistic light now.
“I used to be quite pessimistic and negative around the third album when I had a nervous breakdown, which was a huge eye-opener,” she explains. “When I recovered, through a long journey, I learned to find faith and hope and happiness and myself again.
“Having the experience that I have now, I think I’ve also learned to look after myself a lot more as a woman. When I was younger, before you have children, your life is about your career and being the best instead of having fun and looking after yourself. Now when I look at my kids, I think ‘God, to be able to have beautiful children and feed them and look at them grow!’ There’s a lot of hope and perspective now and I will always count my blessings and keep my focus.”
Even though O’Riordan has grown up, don’t expect her newest baby to be an easy listening affair. AYL? still rocks pretty hard. Maybe not smothered-in-gold, flailing-in-front-of-a-crucifix, singing-about-zombies-hard, but rockin’ nonetheless.
“It’s funny because when I started with this album I thought I would do a nice teary piano record and it started out that way and I wrote a couple of dark piano songs,” O’Riordan says. “But then it just became really boring and dull to me and I said, ‘You know what? It kind of needs to rock.’ I just really enjoy the rocking bits and ended up incorporating a lot of guitar back into this album again. I suppose it’s sort of part of my make-up now.”

Source: ChartAttack.com Staff

Posted in Stuff, Articles |


Author: By BEN WENER
Source:
http://www.ocregister.com/

I take the title question of the former Cranberries singer’s first solo album, “Are You Listening?,” as if it’s asking me whether I’ve been paying attention to the sort of portentous, heavily dramatic Irish rock that O’Riordan and Sinead O’Connor and, um, pretty much nobody else worth remembering once made, back when the ’80s were becoming the ’90s.

Answer: No, apart from having to endure Evanescence whenever it’s unavoidable, I haven’t listened to that sort of thing since Sinead made “Universal Mother’ in ‘94. I have a good reason, I think: Too much of that sound can begin to drone on and on, especially when the songwriting fails the atmosphere. Sinead’s “The Lion and the Cobra” and “I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got” ?€“ and, I should add, the first two Cranberries albums ?€“ sustain interest through variety, dynamics, resonant melodies and lyrics full of escapist wonder and heartbreaking solace.

But while I haven’t listened to that since “Universal Mother,” I havekept listening to Sinead, because her evolution remains fascinating; two years ago she movingly explored her love of Jamaican music and philosophy, this June she unveils a double-disc focused on “Theology.” O’Riordan, on the other hand, has returned after six years of nothing more than cameos, with an album that reveals her stuck in time yet sometimes desperately trying to sound modern.

Sonically, that is. Lyrically she’s inspired by current personal matters her husband, the death of her grandmother. But while I’ll grant that, say, “Black Widow” (that’s the one for Grandma) is more listenable than Evanescence in part because it’s half an homage to the feel of Enya and Clannad it’s nonetheless a prime example of what’s wrong with this comeback effort: It too often sounds like O’Riordan and co-producer Youth (shaper of booming U2 and Verve productions) are trying to make the same ol’ Cranberries sound salable to a younger demographic.

When, frankly, the same ol’ Cranberries sound wasn’t so salable the first time around. O’Riordan’s fluttering voice would have had to hiccup up a half-dozen more memorable hits for that. I bet there are staunch fans of her approach who will glom onto this in a major way. If the title question is anything like what I think it is, then Dolores is right to wonder if anyone at all has been listening. Whaddya expect? They’ve been starved. So let ‘em feast.

Me, I’m on hunger strike.

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Source: http://www.sputnikmusic.com/album.php?reviewid=12046

Oh Dolores, what would we do without you? You were the most distinct member of The Cranberries. You wrote most of their material. Your lyrics were quite cheesy, but charming all the same. You were pretty much the reason why The Cranberries were (are) so much fun to listen to. It’s been four years since the Irish band announced that it would be going on indefinite hiatus, and while I have been only a fan of the band for maybe 10 months now, for the seasoned Cranberries fan it’s been quite a time since they released their latest album, Wake Up and Smell the Coffee, in 2001. So when it was announced that Dolores O’Riordan’s debut solo album, Are You Listening, was set for a 2007 release date, to say that fans were fairly excited would be quite the understatement. And with her first record in six years, Dolores fails to disappoint, seemingly picking up were she last left off.

Yes, perhaps the most apt description of Are You Listening is a continuation of the sound explored on The Cranberries’ later records. And seeing as Dolores was the main songwriter for The Cranberries, this shouldn’t come to much of a surprise. Many of the tracks follow a simple verse/chorus/verse/chorus format, often containing calm, peaceful introductions which eventually lead to loud, catchy, sing-along choruses. Yes, it’s business as usual O’Riordan, but somehow she manages to keep it fresh and interesting. As usual with her writing, her singing takes precedence over the other elements in her music. This, isn’t exactly a bad thing however, as Dolores hasn’t lost a step during her absence from the music world. Her efforts in Are You Listening’s first single, Ordinary Day are some of the best in her career thus far. One element of the song writing of Are You Listening which I readily enjoy is the emotion behind each of the tracks. Each of the album’s tracks takes on a different emotion, be it the heartfelt Ordinary Day, the uplifting Angel Fire, the mysterious Black Widow, or the irate Loser; and as a result are quite fun to listen to.

Looking back, it seems as though The Cranberries’ best songs were the singles. Indeed, Zombie, Hollywood, Linger, and Ridiculous Thoughts are some of my favourite songs from the alternative rock band. With Dolores’ debut solo record this trend does not totally escape this pattern. Ordinary Day is indeed one of the stronger tracks to be heard on the recording. The lyrics are fairly cringe-worthy, as one would expect, but Dolores’ delivery is quite memorable and effective. A combination of acoustic guitars and synths picks up the brunt of the rhythm work, but the highlight here is definitely Dolores’ pop sensibilities. In the Garden is another particularly strong piece. Throughout various the song bouts of heaviness are introduced through simple, yet effective power chords. Is the track as heavy as Zombie? Not really, as synths and piano ease the overall feel of the song, but it would be quite fair to say that In the Garden would be one of O’Riordan’s heavier songs. Finally, the likes of Black Widow also present a different edge to Dolores’ music. Perhaps the most atypical of her songs, it remains soft, calm, and quite throughout a majority of its runtime. Artistically, this would probably be one of her more creative tracks, as the music and lyrics correlate perfectly to create a dark, mysterious vibe. Quite enjoyable if you ask me.

After a four year absence, I wasn’t really expecting much from Dolores O’Riordan. I wasn’t confident that her debut solo album would be able to conjure up the same magic which Cranberries albums such as No Need to Argue and Everyone Else Is Doing it easily did. But this is Dolores we’re talking about, and with Are You Listening, O’Riordan has definitely dispelled my doubt. A rather solid album chock full of excellent song writing, catchy alt rock songs, and softer ballad-esque tracks, overall Are You Listening is a fairly worthwhile album. I would definitely recommend it to fans of Dolores’ past works, as it picks up right where she left off four years ago. Solid effort all around.

Recommended Tracks:
October
Ordinary Day
In The Garden
Angel Fire
Black Widow

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Souce: http://www.towerrecords.com/

As the lead vocalist of the hugely popular group the Cranberries, Dolores O’Riodan left the imprint of her powerful, ululating pipes on the eardrums of millions of listeners in the late 1990s and early 2000s. After that band’s dissolution in 2001, O’Riodan took her time putting together a solo album, and it wasn’t until 2007 that ARE YOU LISTENING? was finally released.

ARE YOU LISTENING? is melodic, lilting and, somewhat surprisingly, packs more of a punch than anything the Cranberries ever released. In fact, the sound here tips its hat at times to the underground rock of the early ’80s, keeping the focus on thumping rhythms and chiming guitars. O’Riodan’s voice is as compelling as ever in this context, especially on album highlights like “Ordinary Day” and “Human Spirit.”

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Author: Sal Cinquemani
Posted: May 13, 2007
Source: http://www.slantmagazine.com/music/music_review.asp?ID=1124

Who walks down to the sea in the morning to sit in the long grass, and then rhymes “sea” with?€¦”sea”? Dolores O’Riordan, that’s who. Obscured by The Cranberries’ lush, ornate arrangements, her lyrics always carried the illusion of import, but as the band’s music got more hard-edged and political, O’Riordan’s words got more and more cringe-inducing. “It’s so thought-provoking, so emotion-evoking,” she sings on her solo debut, Are You Listening?, without achieving either of those things. It’s easy to forget that English is not a second language to the Ireland-born O’Riordan. Like most of the album, lead single “Ordinary Day” sounds like a super-varnished Cranberries song, and her lyrical weaknesses become even more visible through the spit-polished sheen, revealing one horribly banal couplet after the next, some of which don’t even rhyme. While O’Riordan’s voice (a facsimile of Sinead O’Connor’s fragile brogue) and her conviction are what carried much of The Cranberries’ output, the songs that work best here are the ones that sound least like those of her former band, and the best moments are the most unexpected ones: the shamrock trip-hop of “Human Spirit”; the arena rock of “Stay With Me”; and “In The Garden,” with its bouncy keyboard, pizzicato strings, electronic programming, abrupt key changes, and explosive electric guitars. “Black Widow” opens with a dainty classical piano melody and ethereal vocals before bursting into an Evanescence-style climax and then disintegrating into a creepy Christmas nightmare. O’Roirdan might be a few years late to the goth-metal party, but it’s a sound that suits her well?€”and one she may very well have influenced. The album’s biggest misstep is “Loser,” which, though unexpected, is also incredibly ugly (”Die, loser, die!” she sings repeatedly toward the end). To answer the album’s titular query: yes, but I’d advise listeners not to pay attention to the lyrics.

Posted in Review, Stuff |


By MARK DANIELL — For JAM! Music

“Stop it,” Cranberries frontwoman Dolores O’Riordan chides. “Is it that gorgeous there? You’re making me jealous now. We could be in the boat out on the lake.”
Calling from Dublin late one April evening, the lithe singer-songwriter retreats downstairs eager to hear news about Toronto, her home-away-from-home. “You know, my husband’s from there,” she says giddily. “We moved over to Canada for a bit, lock, stock and barrel. The kids went to school there and everything.”
In between packing for a trip to Hong Kong to promote her first solo album - “Are You Listening?” - since the Cranberries went on an indefinite hiatus a few years back, O’Riordan says it was her solitary walks near her northern Ontario cottage that got her creative juices flowing again.
“I was kind of writing as a hobby, it’d gone back to being a hobby for me, and I found I got a lot of material done up there in Ontario in the middle of the forest,” she says.
After auditioning and winning the lead vocalist gig with the Cranberries in 1990, O’Riordan, 35, was the voice behind some of Ireland’s most memorable songs during the ’90s. While U2 flirted with electronica, and Sinead O’Connor watched her career get eclipsed by her erratic personal life, the Limerick, Ireland, quartet etched out a spot for themselves on alternative radio dials across the continent with their alternating mix of slow-motion pop (”Linger”) and explosive rock (”Zombie”).
Sporting a spunky new hairdo with each new release following 1993’s wildly popular, “Everyone Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We?” the band went from playing tiny clubs to packing Toronto’s Molson Amphitheatre in a few short years. But following 2001’s “Wake Up and Smell the Coffee,” the group went their separate ways to pursue solo projects.

http://jam.canoe.ca/Music/Artists/O/ORiordan_Dolores/2007/05/10/4169317-ca.html

Posted in Stuff, Articles |



Dolores O'Riordan - Are You Listening?Remember those scenes in High Fidelity (either the novel or the film, it doesn’t matter), when record-geek Rob tracks down his top five loves of his life, and one by one, sees them with fresh eyes to lose his starry-eyed memories of each old flame? Hearing Dolores O’Riordan sing a once more is a little like that. Sure, she and her former band, The Cranberries, probably weren’t ever in your Top Five all-time bands — even back in 1995 — but who can’t hear “Zombie” without a little pang for the glory days of alt-rock?

The Cranberries’ short-lived stay as champions of the alt-rock buzz bin are fun to revisit, but O’Riordan’s solo debut, Are You Listening? is like bumping into a long-lost crush and realizing she’s not nearly as witty, sexy or intelligent as you once thought. It’s not that you mis-remembered, either: O’Riordan’s voice — that warbly tone that simultaneously shoots out of the most nasal regions of her throat and the most booming section of her gut — is as distinctive as ever. Her choice of musical direction is rarely surprising, either: It harbors a bit of a thing for the light alt-pop of her former band (”Accept Things”) and carries a torch for the ‘Berries’ hard-rockin’ middle-years slump (”Loser”). When O’Riordan whips out a few new tricks, mostly just pushing Cranberries tunes through the looking glass to play with textures and ambiences lifted from the Banshees’ eyeliner days (”Black Widow”), we’re not just left feeling it’s a gimmicky addition to the repertoire, but a last, desperate attempt to rekindle a spark by proving Ms. O’s moved on and grown up, too.

Which she has, but only minimally. As focal point for The Cranberries, O’Riordan was a solo artist in all but name. Are You Listening? just underscores that, as O’Riordan recreates and condenses the band’s output, simplifying here, expanding it there and, just like the old days, letting her vocals carry the load.

And while we may have a soft spot in our heart for O’Riordan’s signature yowl in songs like “Linger” and “Zombie,” 12 years after the fact, Are You Listening? is more of a confirmation that some things — The Cranberries included — might not be quite as great as we remembered.

- Matt Schild

http://www.aversion.com/bands/reviews.cfm?f_id=3105

Posted in Review, Stuff |


It`s been four years since `90s modern rock darlings the Cranberries went on hiatus. It`s taken the years since for lead singer Dolores O`Riordan to record solo bow ‘Are You Listening?,’ due May 15. Launch single “Ordinary Day” showcases a tempo closer to pop classic “Linger” than delectable screamer “Zombie,” with its hypnotic harmonies and steady acoustic instrumentation.

The lyric (”Always be yourself along the way/Living through the spirit of your dreams”) is a guidebook for O`Riordan`s third daughter, Dakota. Adult top 40 has a prizewinner here: familiar voice, female-friendly message and opulent melody. An esteemed, handsome return.

Source: http://music.monstersandcritics.com/reviews/article_1304343.php/Single_Reviews_Green_Day_Fabolous_Dolores_O_Riordan_Bjork_Tori_Amos

Posted in Review, Stuff |


Posted on Jun 6, 07 at 09:12 PM
Celebrity Baby Blog - Forest Hills,NY,USA
By Missy, CBB Writer

One of the best benefits of having a solo career, Dolores O’Riordan recently revealed, was being able to breastfeed her daughter Dakota Rain, 2, for as long as she wanted. While fronting The Cranberries, Dolores said a return to the band always meant a premature end to the breastfeeding relationship she shared with her two previous children, 9-year-old Taylor Baxter and 6-year-old Molly.

For the first time in my life, I didn’t have the band waiting. I didn’t have to go back to rehearsals at three months or four months and break the nursing. I got to sit around a little bit longer and all I had to worry about was feeding the baby. That was quite nice.

Dolores says her new song ‘Ordinary Day’ was inspired by Dakota.

When you’re a mother and you look at your little girl sometimes, you have a flash where that could be yourself. They just remind you of when you were small. Back then, I was thinking, ‘Gosh, what if I really knew I was four or five what lay ahead of me?’ You’d love to make life just so perfect for them but you know that they have to go challenges and the ups and downs of growing up.

Dolores and her husband Don Burton will celebrate their 13th wedding anniversary next month.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Dolores O’Riordan Interview
By Daniel Robert Epstein
Year: 2007

Dolores O’Riordan is best known as the vocalist for The Cranberries. After over a decade with that band, O’Riordan has finally decided to take the plunge with her own solo album, Are You Listening?. I got a chance to talk with O’Riordan as she was rehearsing to perform on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.

UGO: Do you have a show tonight?

Dolores O’Riordan: Yeah, we’re doing Jay Leno.

UGO: Cool. So you’re there now.

Dolores: I’m here just walking around inside the building. We did Carson Daly yesterday.

UGO: It seems like each song on Are You Listening? had a very different inspiration. Is that true?

Dolores: That’s right, yeah. I wrote the album over a four year period and it wasn’t a conscientious thing. There was no structure on how it would be written or anything like that. It became a very a fluid, organic experience. I started to write as a hobby again, and that’d be the first time that I had that opportunity since before I joined The Cranberries as a teenager. It was because I just took a break from it all and I just went off and started this.

UGO: Did you know it was going to eventually be your first solo album?

Dolores: I didn’t because, to me, life is so exciting and unpredictable so you never really know. You don’t even know what you’re going to be next year, but I never thought this album would happen. At the start, it seemed like such a big ambition. I thought I’d be able to write all the songs on my own, but I was quite used to having other people to bounce stuff off of. Then a couple of years into it, I’d written loads of stuff and I thought I should do a solo album. After a while, I had about 30 songs and we started shopping around.

UGO: So it was a very different process than writing with The Cranberries.

Dolores: Yeah, I found it to be a really different experience because, with The Cranberries, there was always a certain element of, “I knew they were waiting for me.” But this is the first time in my life I didn’t have to do it, so it was brilliant to have that feeling. I don’t have to make music if I don’t want to. Suddenly, you have no inhibitions and you write what you like. On the weekend I’d sit down, maybe when the kids were asleep, have a glass of wine and start playing with the piano. It became a very relaxing and therapeutic process.

UGO: Was the song “Ordinary Day” inspired by the birth of your daughter, Dakota?

Dolores: Yes, she’s two years old now. When you’re a mother and you look at your little girls sometimes, you have a flash where that could be yourself. They just remind you of when you were small. Back then, I was thinking, “Gosh, what if I really knew when I was four or five what lay ahead of me?” You’d love to make life just so perfect for them but you know that they have to go through challenges and the ups and downs of growing up.

UGO: What was different about the birth of Dakota from that of your other kids?

Dolores: The biggest difference was that for the first time in my life, I didn’t have the band waiting. I didn’t have to go back to rehearsals at three months or four months and break the nursing. I got to sit around a little bit longer and all I had to worry about was feeding the baby. That was quite nice, because with the other two children I did have The Cranberries waiting. Now, I could just enjoy and not worry about anything.

UGO: I know that your mother-in-law getting ill was what inspired the song “Black Widow.” Was it your feelings about it or your husband’s feelings?

Dolores: Just my feelings about it. It was really strange because I’d come across so many people who have encountered it in some form or other in their lives. Whether it would be a brother or sister or parent or whatever but I became aware of how absolutely devastating it is.

UGO: How did you end up collaborating with Graham Hopkins?

Dolores: I think I just met him in Dublin at a gig one night. I was looking for a drummer and I was asking around Dublin. But we ended up bumping into him and he started playing on my stuff. I love his drumming style. If you’ve got a good rocking drummer, it really makes a difference to your sound. We did a gig in London and we did eight songs and I think he broke six sticks. He must hit it pretty hard. Also, Marco Mendoza is an amazing bass player. He plays with Ted Nugent and Whitesnake, so he’s from the rock school, but he’s got a great technique.

UGO: I read that you collaborated with a producer named Youth. Is that true?

Dolores: Yeah. That was just before Christmas. I had pretty much recorded and written everything. Then, just before Christmas, the A&R guy who signed me suggested collaborating with Youth. So I collaborated with Youth on four tracks. We ended up using two on the album, “Apple” and “Ordinary Day.” We also recorded a track which probably could be a B side.

UGO: This is a very stripped down album. How did that come about?

Dolores: I did the majority of the creative process of this record. I did half of it in my house on ProTools. When you’re rehearsing with a band in a room, you don’t really get to think that much. You don’t get to sit back and really think, but with ProTools, you can put it down and then you can sit back and listen to it, then you can actually put it away for four days and pull it back out and listen to it again and hear it with fresh ears. So we did that a lot as well. I tried to keep it very fresh and I tried to listen to it with many different objectives.

UGO: I read that “Ordinary Day” is going to get a remix. What do you like about having your songs remixed?

Dolores: I just think it’s all pretty cool, or whatever. People like to get up and do a bit of dance and shaking the booty. I find it interesting.

UGO: I read that you collaborated with Angelo Badalamenti not too long ago. I love his music. How was it working with him?

Dolores: He’s fantastic. We did everything on ProTools over a three and a half year period and we only met each other this year in January. Technology is amazing. Angelo is fantastic to work with. It was a big dream of mine to work with him. I approached him and he was like, “Yeah, come on, let’s do something.” the stuff we did together I really love, because it’s just really different. We did a song called “The Butterfly.” I usually sent him a bunch of lyrics and then he sent me that music. Then I would lay down my voice or something and sent it back to him.

UGO: The Cranberries have taken a break but I heard that you were interested in doing something with them again.

Dolores: Not really. I haven’t written off the idea of a reunion, but I couldn’t see it being immediately, because I’ve really been really branching out and starting to have fun in a different way now. I want to experiment a little bit more for the next few years. After 16 years in a band, it became quite predictable. We’d do an album and then a tour then I had a baby and then we do another album and a tour and another baby. After so long, I wanted to do something different. Maybe we’ll do a reunion tour in ten years.

UGO: How did you end up in the Adam Sandler movie Click last year?

Dolores: His people contacted my people and just asked me if I would come and do a cameo. I was pretty flattered because I really like Adam Sandler. I’ve always loved and admired his work and I find him very amusing. The first time I’ve ever seen him in a movie was The Wedding Singer. Then I got to play a wedding singer in his movie. It’s funny.

UGO: What movies do you usually have on the tour bus?

Dolores: There’s usually the Godfather Trilogy, Schindler’s List and all those old classics.

UGO: That’s some heavy stuff.

Dolores: Yeah, but the drivers have their own stuff.

UGO: But you’re happy with Schindler’s List and the Godfather movies.

Dolores: I watched them once and I wouldn’t watch it again. I don’t really like graphic visual violence. I’m not really big into the kung fu movies, either.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Author: Aidin Vaziri
Date: Sunday, May 13, 2007
Source:

San Francisco Chronicle, http://www.sfgate.com/

As the lead singer of the Cranberries, Dolores O’Riordan owned the ’90s. Named the highest-earning woman in

Ireland, she married Duran Duran’s tour manager in a transparent dress, relegated her band members to separate tour buses and feverishly battled anorexia rumors. The Irish band sold more than 30 million albums before imploding after its fifth release, “Wake Up and Smell the Coffee,” in 2001. After taking six years off to raise her family, O’Riordan, 35, returns with her solo premiere CD, “Are You Listening?” She plays July 20 at the Fillmore in San Francisco.

Q: How did you manage to make an album with two kids running all over the place?

A: Four, my darling.

Q: Four kids?

A: Four kids, yeah.

Q: I must have lost count.

A: I’m an Irishwoman. I always wanted a good brood.

Q: But you only took six years off.

A: Well, I have a 15-year-old stepson. I gave birth to my first child 10 years ago this year, my second is 6 and my baby is 2. I’ve been a busy bee — hatching and singing and hatching and singing.

Q: In that order?

A: Totally in that order.

Q: That makes it doubly impressive.

A: Actually, it’s kind of weird. When you have a few good kids, they play with each other. The older kids entertain the babies, they help dress each other, they like to be involved. They like to help load the dishwasher and bring their laundry up.

Q: So, basically, you put them to work.

A: It’s good for them.

Q: It doesn’t look like a bunch of kids came out of you.

A: Thanks very much. I’m flattered. It’s funny, because when you’re having the babies you don’t socialize. You’re staying at the house waiting for this little thing to grow, so I took up knitting.

Q: It’s hard to picture the woman who sang “Zombie” knitting mittens.

A: I know. It’s amazing what we go through, us women. When we get pregnant, we get all soft and motherly and we knit. It’s quite normal, actually.

Q: Did you experience any postpartum depression?

A: No, I was very lucky. I breast-fed the children, and that helps out quite a lot. It makes you feel good because your body releases all these hormones that make you relax. Also, when you’re nursing your baby, it feels like they’re back in your tummy, so it’s not that big of a departure. It’s something I was really blessed to do.

Q: Britney Spears shaved her head after she had her babies. You did it before you had yours. What was your problem?

A: I was 18 years old when I joined the ‘Berries. The first album was huge. Six million is an awful lot to sell for a bunch of kids from a small town in Ireland. It was all a big party, and then the pressure was on to make another. The next one was even bigger, so there’s even more pressure. We were living in buses for five years now. No sense of normality. No friends. No freedom. I overdid it. I was obviously losing too much weight and getting depressed from working too much. I had no normality, no sanity.

Q: How did you get through it?

A: It was just getting away from the public eye. You have to jump off the treadmill because you’re going to break your neck otherwise.

Q: Do you feel sane now?

A: Totally. You relax more in your 30s. You realize the most important thing is that you have to look after yourself and get dinner on the table. It’s grand when you find that head space.

Q: So people shouldn’t be afraid of you anymore?

A: No. I don’t bite at all.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


Adding news, articles and other material to our site is really easy! It’s just the same as writing messages on the forum. Try it out and you’ll see.
If you have any questions, be sure to Mail to us, and we’ll definitely answer!

There are 2 ways to add news, reviews and interviews to our site:
1) Automatic (you’ll need to Register on our site);
2) Manual (you’ll Send us a letter with the news or article and we’ll add it to our site manually).

The first way is preferred, as it is easier and faster. Let’s describe in detail.
To Register, you’ll have to fill in the gaps Name and E-Mail. After you register, you’ll receive a letter with your password via e-mail. Using your Name and the password, you Go to the Control Panel, there you choose the “Write” section, and a window appears, just like it does on the forum. You’ll write the title and the body of the article or news. You can also copy your text from html, selecting text holding left mouse button and inserting it into the message box. All the tags (like italics, links and images) will be added to the message automatically!
When the message is ready, you’ll just have to pick the category for your Message (on the right: News, Articles, Interviews, Reviews) and then press the “Add Message” button.

If you prefer to add news Manually, then the form is quite the same, just send it to our E-Mail and we’ll add the article, mentioning your name!

Some aspects:

1) We write your name above the texts of an article or news you’ve sent. Which means your help in development of our site will definitely be pointed out.
2) After the registration you’ll be able to write new messages, but the first 3 messages will only be published after the moderators have looked them through (spam protection).
3) After you write 3 messages to us, E-Mail to us, and we’ll promote you to the “Authors” status. It will grant you the possibility to publish your news or reviews on the site without having to wait for the moderators to check them.

Recommendations on writing a message:
1) The text should be easy to read, you’d better not make it all in bold or italic.
2) It’s good to add a link to the source, which should be placed at the end of the message (in ordinary font and colour, and write it ONCE, except for links to multimedia).
3) When you write news (not other categories), you should also add the data as “year.month.day - ” (like, “2007.12.10 - News’ Name).
4) If you’ve written the review or translated the article to Russian by yourself, be sure to mention it at the beginning of the message.

Posted in Dolores News |


I suppose you know, that Dolores plays different musical instruments: acoustic and electric guitar, keyboard, tin whistle and mandolin.

Dolores plays the Tin Whistle ( Generation Nickel D Tin Whistle) when she performances new song ?€?Human Spirit?€? on her concerts! It’s a really great even, cos it’s the first record with Dolores playing this uncommon musical instrument! Here is a photo of tin whistle:

http://www.the-cranberries.ru/phorum/index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=62

You can download Human Spirit (live in Barcelona) here:

Human Spirit: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=L0BNYZXB
Human Spirit2: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=J3NPYVX0

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores had a concert in Barcelona several days ago. Video record is accessible for free download. It’s on free hosting Megaupload, but we will reupload it to our hosting soon. Also there will be mp3 of this concert soon.

2 screenshots: screenshot 1, screenshot 2

Zombie: http://www.megaupload.com/?d=1QRCYXVY
Angel Fire (intro): http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=OHJ1RGTK
Animal instinct: http://www.megaupload.com/?d=RKR786LY
Apple: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=Y2OJPIOE
Apple 2: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=A2KG0HW0
Ordinary Day: http://www.megaupload.com/?d=3K3TQR3O
Agua!: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=CWJ6123E
Ode: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=XXYDZK7E
Human Spirit: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=L0BNYZXB
Human Spirit2: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=J3NPYVX0
Ovacion y Black Widow: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=R5KRVP4H
Pretty: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=3GDZ1UX7
When you’re gone: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=PRUQFHKP
Intro WWWY: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=4194SNHY
October (final): http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=4XDOTYR5
Dreams: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=8JDYZM8V
Loser: http://www.megaupload.com/es/?d=1FCRXNJQ

 

Thank to Lyapis for links.

 

Posted in Dolores News |


• We have added new video for free download:
- Ordinary Day - Europe2
- Ordinary Day - Jay Leno Show 07
- Go Your Own Way - Europe2
- Sevilla Concert (Angel Fire, Animal Instinct, Loser, When You’re Gone, Zombie)

• You can find new audio in Audio-section:
Zacoustic by Zegut
1. “When You’re Gone” (5,7Mb)
2. “Ordinary Day” (4,6Mb)
3. “Apple Of My Eye” (5,1Mb)
4. “In The Ghetto” (3,6Mb)

If you have found new Dolores’ video, plz, Share with us, and we will post it on our site and mark your help for sure! Helping us you help to thousands Cran-Dolores fans all over the world, who visit our site. They will be thankful to you too!

Also we want to buy full Dolores’ concerts in good quality. Contact us if you have video-audio record of Dolores show!

Posted in Site Update |


FaceCulture, www.faceculture.nl, spoke to Dolores O’Riordan in a hotel in Brussels. Dolores told about each Cranberries album, her solo album Are You Listening? the songs Black Widow, When We Were Young, The Apple of my Eye, In the Garden, Ave Maria for The Passion of the Christ, her family, a nervous breakdown, Linger, Snow Patrol, Evanescence, Razorlight, Dido, AC DC, The Rolling Stones, the cancer of het mother in law and father, doing a cover of Elvis’ In The Ghetto, criticism of her lyrics and lots more!!

You can watch the interview here.

Source: Martin (thanx him for the link!), www.faceculture.nl

Posted in Dolores News |


It’s strange, but Dolores has got driving licence only half-year ago! Maybe you know that Dolores wrote song “Every Morning” (2000) after she failed her drive-test. So 6 years passed… She had her driving test in Canada last winter.

Congratulate on this even, Dolores!

Source quote:

19 May 2007

CRANBERRY O’RIORDAN LEARNS TO DRIVE IN THE SNOW

Former THE CRANBERRIES star DOLORES O’RIORDAN is celebrating after passing her driving test in Canada.

The Irish singer, who is married to Canadian Don Burton, took her test in freezing temperatures in her adopted second home recently.
She tells Mojo magazine, ‘It was challenging 20 degrees below and in about five feet of snow on the wrong side of the road.’
http://www.pr-inside.com/entertainment-blo?€¦ns-to-drive-in/

Posted in Dolores News |


Total sales till this moment are 38,000 copies of album. Album “Are You Listening” on 37th position in TOP-40.
http://www.mediatraffic.de/albums.htm

Italia - 2nd place, 1 week in hit-parade:
http://allcharts.ru/music/italy/albums.htm

Ireland - 19 place, 2 weeks in hit-parade, the best position is 15th place
http://allcharts.ru/music/ireland/albums.htm

Album has lower positions in all another countries, even in France and Germany.

Support Dolores! Buy licensed copy in magazines of your city! If you can’t find it there, try to buy it in internet on www.shop.com or www.amazon.com. It’s very cheap! Buying album you say “I like it!” to Dolores creative work!

Posted in Dolores News |


Today official site of the VERY POPULAR russian reality show? “House-2″ put great review for Dolores album “Are You Listening?”. They write that there are many hits and it’s sounds a bit like The Cranberries’ songs. Also they recommend to listen to the album, and suppose that song Ordinary Day is a hit for all times!

“House-2″ maybe is the most popular TV-show in Russia. Their site has about 30.000 visitors every day! We hope that their great review will make many people to listen to Dolores’ album!

Source: http://www.dom2.ru/pulse/advice/?id=17123&category=music

Posted in Dolores News |


Download new Dolores’ acoustic video-concert in Sevilla, Spain. Dolores sings perfect!

Angel Fire:
http://www.sendspace.com/file/9ov9hv

Animal Instinct:
http://www.sendspace.com/file/tg5u76

Loser:
http://www.sendspace.com/file/g9ddmc

When You’re Gone:
http://www.sendspace.com/file/xbk92e

Zombie:
http://www.sendspace.com/file/kc8zs3

Posted in Dolores News |


Today is a day of official album “Are You Listening” release! You can buy it in europe shops!

For people who lives in another countries you can order it here:
http://www.shop.com/op/aprod-p54967827-k24-g1-~Dolores+O%27Riordan%252BORDINARY+DAY-nover

Posted in Dolores News |


New single “Ordinary Day” on 30.04.2007. There you can find new song “Forever”.

Song lyric:

FOREVER

Please be strong, carry on,
come whatever may.
In the dark, in the dark
never be afraid.
Cause once in a lifetime
the young ones fly away.
Only once in a lifetime
young ones fly away.
I will stay here

Forever and ever,
I will be around.
Forever and ever,
I will be the ground
that you walk on.

If you fall, if you fall
I will be beside you.
If you call at all,
I’ll be there to guide you.
There’s something between us
words can never say.
And only once in a lifetime
young ones fly away.
I will stay ‘

Forever and ever,
I will be around.
Forever and ever,
I will be the ground
that you walk on.Source: JV11

Posted in Dolores News |


Magazine “Play” published article about new album “Are You Listening?” (it’s written by Sergey Stepanov), He is a big The Cranberries’ fan and review is very positive! BTW our site helped to “Play’s” journalists with Dolores’ promo photos.;)

Articles “Not Zombie”

Download scans there:
- Page 1
- Page 2

Source: Djambulad West

Posted in Dolores News |


Song “Ordinary Day” is on the 7th position on this week in chart Hit-Parade of 2 capitals on radio “Maximum”. Vote for “Ordinary Day”.

But the most interesting that DJ reminded about our site www.doloresoriordan.net and preised our work! He said that he our site is very informative and very interesting. Thank to Alexander for that!

We hope that thanks to his reference many people, who love Doloresm will know about out site, cos radio Maximim is the most popular music radio in Russia!

Source - Geenay.

Posted in Dolores News |


Vote for “Ordinary Day” in MTV Russian - chart “20 the best”!

http://www.mtv.ru/air/charts/top20/vote.wb?€¦2f-51a5973d23fa

Let’s support Dolores and vote for her! We hope she will get high position and many russian people will hear Dolores’ perfect voice!

Posted in Dolores News |


Enjoyment > Music > Features
CHRIS MUGAN
The Independent

Published: 04 May 2007

Experience counts as Cranberries’ Dolores goes solo
The Cranberries’ vocalist is recording again after her maternity leave. Now solo, Dolores O’Riordan talks to Chris Mugan

Showcase gigs are usually uncomfortable, anodyne affairs, where a new signing performs for a record label’s staff and invitees. The cool reception and polite applause can make for a dispiriting start to a solo career. Dolores O’Riordan doesn’t let this get to her. The former lead singer of The Cranberries may only be performing in the basement of a private members’ club, but she punches the air as if reaching out to the furthest reaches of a vast arena. As the former singer of one of Ireland’s biggest cultural exports, adjusting to more intimate venues is going to take some time. At least she is enjoying performing again, after her old band stuttered to a close.

Next day, the star from Limerick looks just as fresh-faced as we chat about the gig in a north London office complex. She laughs when I mention the eye-popping energy of drummer Graham Hopkins, formerly of Northern Ireland’s explosive rock outfit Therapy?. “He broke six sticks that night, you know,” she says proudly, in a brogue that betrays her roots.

The vocalist is just as proud of the rest of her new band. “It’s a relief because I do want to tour and you need to have that energy and bond, so it’s all falling into place. Especially because this record is not a stylised or manufactured thing, it’s about the songs.”

As if to emphasis the point, she is dressed in black with a studded belt that would suit fellow Irish legend Phil Lynott. Despite the rock look, O’Riordan still exudes the maternal glow of a mother of three. She was last in the news in 2004 for being unsuccessfully sued by a former nanny, though it is more life-changing events that inform new album Are You Listening?. Death and new life are the two poles between which she has oscillated over a four-year stretch.

“I was doing it as therapy,” O’Riordan explains about the personal nature of her songwriting, and the time it took to release her first solo record. “I wanted to switch off and be a human being, so I escaped from the industry and the whole entertainment side of things. For 14 or 15 years I’d always felt under pressure, because there was always another album to come, and another album then.”

The Cranberries formed in Limerick in 1990, with 19-year-old O’Riordan imposing herself as the band’s precocious lyricist. Indeed, her calling card was the words to what became one of their biggest hits, “Linger”. Their debut album came out three years later and after a faltering start propelled them to fame on both sides of the Atlantic. Everybody Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We? was ignored in the US until The Cranberries toured there and got on MTV, while it took 12 months for “Linger” to become a UK hit.

Their rise continued with their second album No Need To Argue and its histrionic smash hit “Zombie”. Throughout this time, the band toured ceaselessly and racked up sales across the world. Such a focused work ethic stood them in good stead as their output declined in quality and the three albums that followed saw ever-decreasing sales. A sound now aimed at the arenas they played failed to win critical plaudits or new fans, leaving them with such consolations as the minor hit “Promises” in 1999 and a best international sales award in Taiwan. Fittingly for such constant giggers, their swan song was support slots with the Stones and AC/DC.

Almost since The Cranberries achieved success in the Nineties, rumours have abounded that O’Riordan would go solo. “People were always saying that,” O’Riordan complains. “I wanted to fulfil the journey with [the band], not just jump ship when we had the success. By going through the highs and lows, you learn from your mistakes.”

Stars, The Cranberries’ greatest hits set, was a full stop for the band, though before then its members knew the end was nigh, especially as they began to raise families. “There were a lot of things happening in the background, a lot of sick kids. We had one child in an incubator for three months and the same one had leukaemia,” O’Riordan says, careful to protect identities. “One of the guys was coming from hospital to the stage for a year and a half. Another guy got glaucoma, so there was so much illness.”

Only now can O’Riordan admit the toll that success took on her. When she auditioned for the band in 1990, this youngest of seven siblings still lived with her parents. As The Cranberries achieved success in the US, their singer became infamous for a haughty manner and elfin size, which she reveals was due to an eating disorder. She admits to having gone through therapy early in her career after a nervous breakdown in 1994.

“I was 90 pounds in weight, not sleeping, not eating and having a lot of panic attacks. I didn’t know what was happening; you don’t when you’re cracking up, and I couldn’t go home. I didn’t want to go back there with my tail between my legs; I was too proud. Then I went to see a really great psychoanalyst. He saw a lot of entertainers. I needed to get away and find myself. So I went off to the forest for a few months and learnt how to relax. I smelt a flower for the first time in five years and started crying because I realised I’d forgotten about life.”

O’Riordan uses the word “human” a lot, as if to stress that being human is more than simply being a member of a species, it is a state of mind. Her lyrics, too, are full of self-help jargon, whether it is being unable to “relate to you”, or learning to “accept things”.

In 2003,O’Riordan’s mother-in-law was diagnosed with breast cancer and given eight months to live. That inspired “Black Widow”, one of the earliest songs to be written for this album. The singer took time out with her Canadian husband to support his family, putting her kids into school there. “She came round a lot, so that song was about watching her,” O’Riordan remembers. “You don’t know what cancer is like until you go through it with someone, starting on the inside and eating its way to the surface.”

If she has taken one lesson from her time with The Cranberries, it has been not to take herself too seriously. “It’s not about being perfect. If I make a mistake, it’s not the end of the world. When I was younger, I’d be so depressed. I’d sit for hours in my dressing room and couldn’t move on in my head. In my twenties, I thought I knew so much about the world, but when I hit 30 I made so many boo-boos I realised I never knew it all. It’s peculiar when you’re young to have everyone looking at you; you get paranoid and self-conscious. I’d stay in my room doing six hours of yoga.”

She admits to behaving in an arrogant manner. “If you’re with yourself all the time and not meeting anyone or experiencing anyone, you can’t evolve. You get up on stage and get this attention that isn’t natural. I lacked normality and relationships. I had no friends for four or five years, while they all went to college.”

This explains the unevenness of some of her songwriting with The Cranberries, when she would churn out such desperate polemics as “Bosnia” (”We live in our secure surroundings/ And people die out there”). O’Riordan rolls her eyes at the memory. “Taking four years off was such a good idea, because you experience so much. When you try to write an album in a year and you’re living in a tour bus, you can only write about being famous or being stuck in a hotel room.”

What immediately strikes you about Are You Listening? is how personal the record is. “When you go through experiences, whether they are really dark or beautiful, they give you inspiration, but it’s just life, isn’t it? There were no boundaries because I was representing myself and I felt I could really spit things out without inhibitions. If you have pain and issues, once you get them out of your system, every time you perform you feel better. You know you’re not the only one, because everyone else feels it. You become human again.”

Another part of the learning process has been the varied collaborations since she left The Cranberries. O’Riordan has worked with the German dance pioneers Jam & Spoon, Italy’s famed crooner Zucchero and on the soundtrack for Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ. She even had a cameo as a wedding singer in the Adam Sandler vehicle Click.

But it was working with David Lynch’s favourite composer Angelo Badalamenti that had the most impact. “You learn something from all these people, like with Jam & Spoon I was doing a more soulful style, but I contacted Angelo direct. I loved Twin Peaks, and I love that darker music. I realised how much I could do on my own, when he’d send me music and I would lay down vocals at home.”

O’Riordan nursed her youngest girl Dakota on the set of Click, after a period of inactivity to raise the child and ensure that her other children did not feel left out. When she returned home, she wrote her song for Dakota, the first single “Ordinary Day”, and set about writing in earnest. She’s married to the former Duran Duran tour manager Don Burton, so forming a band was simplicity itself. The most surprising thing about the album, especially after the lilting melancholy of “Ordinary Day”, is its rocky extremes, notably the super-heavy, Metallica-style power chords on “In the Garden” and the venomous “Loser”.

It is less of a shock when you learn that alongside Therapy?’s Hopkins, there is the bassist Marco Mendoza, who has played with Thin Lizzy and Whitesnake, while Toronto-based Steve Demarchi played guitar for The Cranberries. Yet O’Riordan had not planned on a rock sound. She mentions the song “Letting Go”, again about her mother-in-law, and which was leaked.

“When I started out recording this album, I wrote two songs that didn’t make it on to the record. ‘Letting Go’ had this funeral march thing, and ‘Without You’ was about missing my own family. They were both soft, piano-driven songs, so I thought this album was going to be nice and ethereal, but then I wrote ‘Black Widow’ and I started yelling. I realised I needed drums to take it to the next level, so it all kind of unfolded from there. I didn’t know what kind of music it was, because I don’t have that much knowledge.”

Another track, “Angel Fire”, reminds us of O’Riordan’s spiritual side. She was brought up Catholic and still has fond memories of the former Pope, John Paul II. She is a regular performer at the Vatican’s Christmas concerts, where she premiered the song last year. “I’m Christian in lots of ways, but not conventional. A lot of the stuff I learnt, I take with me today - that we should let each other be ourselves. I was chuffed to see the inside [of the Vatican] and I met Il Papa, who was lovely, very saintly. I was mad about him. I thought he really cared for the poor and he loved to meet the people. I saw him when he came to Limerick, when I was a kid. So it was pretty mindblowing to take my mum out to meet him.”

Despite the involvement of the mega-producer Youth on the single and “Apple of My Eye”, recording Are You Listening? has been a relatively stripped-down affair. The band would fly in to either Toronto or Dublin, where her children go to school, and lay down up to six songs in a two-day session. “They were really great players and it was great that we didn’t have the pressure of a major studio,” O’Riordan enthuses. “Sometimes you draw a mental blank in that situation, which you don’t have in a little room.”

O’Riordan has rediscovered her magic in homely surroundings. With a band she trusts and a healthy work-life balance, she is unlikely to consider a Cranberries reunion in the short term. Indeed, the solo artist jokingly points out that 2010 would mark her old group’s 20th anniversary.

Relations between them remain cordial, though, with offers of guitars for her forthcoming tour. Not that she needs their help - O’Riordan has found that she gets further when she travels light.

Source: http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/

Posted in Dolores News |


• We are open for collaboration, and we glad to accept all kind of your help! We will mark your work and also we will pay back to the most active fans (DVD with rare Dolores’ and The Cranberries’ stuff).

We need in these kinds of help:
- Translation from different languages into english and russian.
- Send your and other reviews and articles about Dolores and her creative work (we will place it on our site)
- If you can draw and made wallpapers or pictures, send them to us.
- Have got interesting news about Dolores? Share with us, and we will post it on out site and mark your help for sure.
- If you have rare mp3-video records share with us and other cran-fans.
If you want to help or have questions, Write to us, plz!

Posted in Site Update |


You can download 30 sec. demo song “Without You” here: http://rapidshare.com/files/27674346/Without_You__30sec_.wav.html (not good quality)

 

WITHOUT YOU

Nothing seems to be worthwhile
Without you
A part of my existence is not here
Without you

You haven’t made your bed
And you lie on it now
You haven’t made your bed
And you lie on it

I try to switch off my mind
But it’s rolling
Rolling on an iceberg
Moving down towards the water

You haven’t made your bed
And you lie on it now
You haven’t made your bed
And you lie on it

So far across the water
Yre always on my mind
You love and understand me
You’e always on my mind
My mind

Maybe I just can’t survive
Without you
Maybe I don’t want to live
Without you

You haven’t made your bed
And you lie on it now
You haven’t made your bed
And you lie on it

So far across the water
You’re always on my mind
You love and understand me
You’re always on my mind
My mind

Without you, without you
Without you, without you

Posted in Dolores News |


Booklet for “Are You Listening?”:

http://tvtel.pt/11757055/doloresoriordan/aylphotos1.jpg
http://tvtel.pt/11757055/doloresoriordan/aylphotos2.jpg
http://tvtel.pt/11757055/doloresoriordan/aylphotos3.jpg
http://tvtel.pt/11757055/doloresoriordan/aylphotos4.jpg
http://tvtel.pt/11757055/doloresoriordan/aylphotos5.jpg
http://tvtel.pt/11757055/doloresoriordan/aylphotos6.jpg
http://tvtel.pt/11757055/doloresoriordan/aylphotos7.jpg


And also there is Dolores’ letter on booklet:

Firstly I would like to dedicate this album to Denise Burton who sadly died in the month of may 2004. She’s a beautiful woman, I loved her too much. I would also like to remember: Mrs. Moore (Gil Moore’s mother) Mrs. O’Rourke(Bernard O’Ruker’s mother).

But remembering, but living thorugh the journer that is life. My daughter Dakote (which means friendly). She has inspired me to continue through the darkness, and only inspire brightness.

I want to thank all of you for being so patient with me because a tru artist has to breathe. I owuld also like to thank my mother, Taylor, Molly, Donny my husband and my family for putting up with my absent mindness. They are the ones I truly love. They make me tryly happy. Finally, I would like to apologise for my lack of contact, and how I have isolated myself. But these are the only means where upon I can grow. I respect you and I love you, and I hpe I will not let you down.

Here’s 2007

Matt Vaghan, wonderful man, wondergul experience. Dan Brodbeck, what can I say, mad in the head, brilliant producer, enginner and doind anything possible to make this album happen (did stupid ever ever make this album?) Gil Moore, the beautiful man I worked with for two songs as he bereaved his mother. Stu young, an amazing man that visited during my journey and brought so much “joie de vivre” into recording. Rich Chycki, who started to make sense out of the whole equation with his amazing touch for, recording and producing and also his eastern European demeaner.

Malcom Dunbar: Sign me - Frightened - Freaking out - What the fuck did I just do? Dolores: Sanctuary? - Why? - When? - What?

My band: Graham Hopkins - “kick Arse” - “Has issues”. Marco Mendoza - “Has Serious Issues”- Steve Demarchi - “Has Very Serious Issues”. Denny Demarchi - Will Find Issues” Dolores O’Riordan- Issues “Lots of ‘em” & Cries A Lot

Then she gives special thanks to many people as Angelo Badalamenti

__________

The quality is not good, but ‘m sure that high-quality version will be accessible soon.

Source: TVTEL.pt

Posted in Dolores News |


Sanctuary uploaded the first concert Dolores ever. This concert was in London , club The Hospital. It was specially for press.

Download video concert London ‘07 (92,9mb)
Download mp3 concert London ‘07 (35mb)

Tracklist:

“Loser”
“Angel Fire”
“In The Ghetto” (Elvis Presley)
“Linger” (Cranberries)
“When We Were Young”
“Ordinary Day”
“Apple Of My Eye”
“Dreams” (Cranberries)

Thanks to Berryman for the link!

Posted in Dolores News |


There you can listen to 30-sec cut from Dolores’ songs Without You!!!
http://www.hmv.com.hk/service/play_track_p…trackid=1256854
The beginning sounds perfect!

Also we have information about one more b-side song “Sisterly Love”. This song will be on Japanese version of album “Are You Listening?”. If you don’t know Dolores has old sister.:)

You can find b-side “Forever” on Japanese version of album too, and also on the third CD-version of single “Ordinary Day”.

You can buy this single here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ordinary-Day-Dolor…n/dp/B000NVIWYM

1. Ordinary Day
2. Without You
3. Forever
4. Ordinary Day (video?)

This 4-track single will be released on 30.04.2007.

The most great variant is to buy Japanese version of album “Are You Listening,” and this CD-single. That way you will get 4 b-side songs!

So album “Are You Listening?” has 4 b-sides. There are the titles of songs:
- Letting Go
- Forever
- Sisterly Love
- Without You

Posted in Dolores News |


Some more Dolores’ interviews video:

- Fast focus Interview on
http://www.fastfocus.tv/media/DoloresORiordan(512k).wmv

- The clip about Polish couple which traveled to London on Dolores’ gig and failed to get there is
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7v53dVClb-4

You can download video from YouTube, using site http://www.keepvid.com

source :ZG

Posted in Dolores News |


Song Ordinary Day was recorded in 2 variants!!!

Download slow and more lirical version of Ordinary Day: Download it

Good Quality, 128 kbps.

It seems like that it’s the first original variant of song. It sounds more natural and emotional.

Do you like this variant? :) Write you opinions on our forum:Click Here

Thanks to JV11 for the link

Posted in Dolores News |


• Download 4 new video in “Video-Section”:
- Clip “Ordinary Day”
- Interview M6 26.03.07
- Interview 40TV (2007)
- In the mind of Dolores Oriordan (2004)

Keep visiting our site. There will be audio and video updates very soon.

Posted in Site Update |


• Visit new gallery with Dolores promo photos.
• You can find new tabs for songs Ordinary Day, October, Away In A Manger, Little Drummer Boy, War Is Over in Tabs Section.
Section Discography is updated! Now you can find information about Dolores’ album and the single, write opinions, listen to Dolores comments for every song and read lyrics.
• We have added lyrics for all songs from album “Are You Listening” + “Letting Go” and “War Is Over” lyrics.
• Read 9 new articles about Dolores and her interviews in Article Section:
- An Ordinary Day with Dolores O’Riordan
- Dolores O’Riordan: Lesbian Icon?
- Irish Times: Interview with Dolores 94
- Details 1996: Dolores Interview
- Top Music: Dolores Interview
- Dolores O’Riordan Goes Folk
- Dolores, Solo, but Missing The Cranberries
- Hot Press: Interview
- The Cranberries Renovated
Keep visiting our site. There will be audio and video updates very soon.

Posted in Site Update |


LIVE DATES

EUROPE 2007

29TH MAY - BARCELONA, SPAIN - RAZZMATAZZ
31ST MAY - MILAN, ITALY - ALCATRAZ
01ST JUNE - ZURICH, SWITZERLAND - KAUFLEUTEN
03RD JUNE - AMSTERDAM, HOLLAND - PARADISO
05TH JUNE - BRUSSELS, BELGIUM - ANCIENNE BELGIQUE
06TH JUNE - PARIS, FRANCE - BATACLAN
08TH JUNE - BERLIN, GERMANY - COLUMBIA CLUB
10TH JUNE - STOCKHOLM,SWEDEN - BERNS
11TH JUNE - COPENHAGEN, DENMARK - VEGA
13TH JUNE - COLOGNE, GERMANY - GLORIA
15TH JUNE - LONDON, U.K. - KOKO CLUB

NORTH AMERICA 2007

6TH JULY - MONTREAL, QC* - PDA THEATRE
7TH JULY - TORONTO, ON* - THE PHOENIX
9TH JULY - BOSTON,MA - AVALON BALLROOM
10TH JULY - NEW YORK,NY - IRVING PLAZA
12TH JULY - WASHINGTON, D.C. - 9:30 CLUB
13TH JULY - PHILADELPHIA, PA - THEATER OF LIVING ARTS
15TH JULY - CHICAGO IL - HOUSE OF BLUES
17TH JULY - DENVER, CO - GOTHIC THEATER
19TH JULY - WEST HOLLYWOOD,CA - HOUSE OF BLUES
20TH JULY - SAN FRANCISCO, CA - THE FILLMORE
22ND JULY - SEATTLE, WA - SHOWBOX SHOWROOM & LOUNGE
23RD JULY - VANCOUVER,BC* - COMMODORE BALLROOM
*Preorder not avaialble in Canada but ticket presale includes these dates.

DOLORES CURRENT schedule::

MEDIA/PRESS/PROMOTIONAL TOUR:

March
21st : Paris, France
23rd: London, England
2nd and 3rd April: Warsaw, Poland
4th April: Athens, Greece
23rd April: Taiwan
24th April: Taiwan
25th April: Hong Kong
26th April: Bangkok, Thailand
3rd May: Seville, Spain (FNAC Store Opening)
4th May: Dublin, Ireland (Late Late Show TV Performance)
14th - 16th: New York, USA
17th - 18th: Los Angeles, USA
21st - 22nd: Tokyo, Japan
23rd - 24th: Melbourne, Australia
25th: Sydney, Australia

REHEARSALS AND PERFORMANCE:

22nd March: Showcase performance in London, England, venue to be confirmed.

Band Rehearsals in Dublin, Ireland 9th thru 20th April.

24th April: Showcase performance in Taiwan
25th April: Showcase performance in Hong Kong
27th April: Showcase performance in Bangkok, Thailand

Band rehearsals in Dublin, Ireland 30th April.

Source: www.doloresoriordan.ie

Posted in Dolores News |


The video for Dolores’s first solo single - filmed in Prague last February has been officially aired.

You can watch it on Youtube by clicking here.
Major thanks to Cjcr!

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores O’Riordan announced the temporary separation of the Cranberries in 2003. But she has not until now decided to publish her new album. We spoke with her on her new release, ‘Are you listening’, on sale in May, on the future of her old band and on how it feels for a religious person like her to be a gay-lesbian icon.Q:If you could imagine how the Cranberries 6th record would to be, what would be the difference between that record and ‘Are you listening’
D: It would be a completely differenct record, because the songs I wrote with the guys were completely different.

Q: However, songs like ‘Loser’ or ‘When we were young’ would fit in a Cranberries album.
D: Yes, because I wrote 70% of the Cranberries music and I write my own songs now. I haven’t changed, and I’m still the same person, and also the same singer. My record is more experimental and for the first time I’ve had to take care of everything myself. Different musicians helped me, and for the first time it’s been pretty experimental. It took me way longer, but I enjoy taking everything calmly, relaxing, and resting.

Q: The first time that there where rumors of your solo career was in the early 90s. When was the first time you really thought about it?
D: Not until I record the ‘Greatest Hits’. Before it had gone through my head, but I knew I wanted to finish what I had with the guys: the 5 CD’s, and the contract we had signed. I wanted to finish the Cranberries with the Cranberries.

Q: SO do you consider the project completely done?
D: It’s a possibility we will reunite, of course. The door is open. It hasn’t closed, who knows.

Q: The theme of death has always appeared in a lot of your songs, and now it’s present in your song ‘Black Widow’. How do you confront it?
D: ‘Black Widow’ is a song about my mother in law’s death. She had cancer, and she fought with all sorts of treatments: chemotherapy, radiation?€¦but everything made her worse. ‘Stay with me’ is a song about cancer my father had. Fortunatley, he was able to get better, but the song is about the fear I felt about losing him. Music is very good therapy to deal with death. It’s a part of your life. Everyone is going to die, everyone around you. And in the end you have to try to move forward.

Q: Religion must help calm your fears, because you are a very religious person. At least from what we can tell with songs like ‘Angel fire’ or ‘This is the day’
D: It’s good to have faith, to think there’s something after death, that we are going to a better place. Maybe we’ll find eachother in another place. It’s good that heaven exist. It would be horrible to think that one day you’ll be underground and that’s it?€¦so I like to think there’s something else.

Q: Does your religion prohibit you from supporting gay marriage?
D: I don’t understand conventional/established religion. I don’t follow anyones established rules. It’s just that I have faith and I beleive in a greater spirit, & that’s it. If gay people want to get married, that’s very good. Everyone is happy.

Q: At one point you became a lesbian icon, given your androginy. Does that bother you given your religion?
D: It was just cos I had short hair. But why would it bother me? I think we should accept each other the way we are. Humans have to be able to love each other. Love can present itself in many different ways. If girls find me attractive I find that fantastic. And same thing if guys find me attractive.

Q: There are songs that seem to be inspired by your husband, and they sound very happy.
D: ‘Apple of my eye’ is a very obvious one. It’s about loving someone, it’s very simple. I think it’s such a simple song that it’s very pretty.

Q: Part of Cranberries charm was that simplicity, but the critics never seem to understand that.
D: I have never cared what the critics thought about my lyrics being too simple. I think it’s always been a charm about the music that I do, and I think that’s why people like my songs.

Q: In this new record you worked with new producers like Dan Brodbeck and Youth. How did you find them?
D: Through Sanctuary. They suggested people for me to work with. Most of the disk belongs to Dan Brodbeck. Youth simply came to Canada and worked on a couple of songs one of them being ‘Ordinary Day’. It was great working with new people. I can’t find a word to describe all the ideas Dan brought in. It was a bunch of things.

Q: What music have you bene listening to lately?
D: I don’t listen to much music now, but I really like Snow Patrol and Coldplay. I don’t have a lot of time now to listen to music. I’m very busy.

Q: There are some metal songs in the album. Do you like metal?
D: Yes I like: Metallica, Aerosmith. I like Think Lizzy and Evanescence.

Q: You start your solo tour on May 29th in Barcelona. Do you hope to come back with a more extensive tour?
D: Right now there are 12 dates in Europe, and 15 in North America in June. I hope to come back to bigger places. It all depends on how the record does. It depends on a lot of things how my kids are doing, how the record is received, how everyone feels.

Posted in Dolores News |


In an interview with Chuaca.com? Dolores has mentioned that she has lined up? 15 tour dates for North America, which will be in June.

The specific dates aren’t revealed yet, but we’ll keep you posted!

Posted in Dolores News |


Posted in Dolores News |


Today was a premier of 2 new Dolores?€™ song ?€?Human Spirit?€? & ?€?When We Were Young?€? on Croatian radio! You can listen to these songs right now. Just click here.

Vote for these songs in our poll Here, plz!

Human Spirit

Don?€™t let life consume you
It could eat you up inside
Can you see the human spirit
Tell me why should I have to hide

And With my heart in my hand
And with my hand upon my heart
And with my heart in my hand
It?€™s not like we planned

Don?€™t betray your lover
You will just betray yourself
Can you see the human spirit
Is there emptiness inside

And With my heart in my hand
And with my hand upon my heart
And with my heart in my hand
It?€™s not like we planned

Can you see the human spirit
Is there emptiness inside
Can you see the human spirit
Is there lonelyness inside

When We Were Young

Doodoo doo doo

Funny how things just tasted better
When we were young
Funny how things just seem so easy
When we were young

It?€™s been a long day
It?€™s been a long day
It?€™s been a long day
It?€™s been a long day

I wanna get out
I wanna go home
Is anything better
That you wanted for?
I wanna get out
I wanna go home
Is anything better
That you wanted for?

Doodoo doo doo

I think that we weren?€™t always grateful
For what you?€™ve done
When we were young
I think that we weren?€™t always grateful
For what you?€™ve done

We?€™ve come a long way
We?€™ve come a long way
We?€™ve come a long way
We?€™ve come a long way

I wanna get out
I wanna go home
Is anything better
That you wanted for?
I wanna get out
I wanna go home
Is anything better
That you wanted for?

You wanted for
You wanted for
You wanted for

I wanna get out
I wanna go home
Is anything better
That you wanted for?
I wanna get out
I wanna go home
I wanna feel better
And make it alone

I wanna get out
I wanna go home
Is anything better
That you wanted for?

Ahhhhehhhohhahahahhhh

Source: ZGF

Posted in Dolores News |


New Dolores o?€™Riordan?€™s song ?€?ORDINARY DAY?€? sounds on Croatian radio! You can listen to this song on Official Site

Write your opinion about this song on our forum

DOLORES O?€™RIORDAN ?€“ ORDINARY DAY

This is just an ordinary day
Wipe the insecurities away
I can see that the darkness will erode
Looking out the corner of my eye
I can see that the sunshine will explode
Far across the desert in the sky

Beautiful girl
Won?€™t you be my inspiration?
Beautiful girl
Don?€™t you throw your love around
What in the world, what in the world
Could ever come between us?
Beautiful girl, beautiful girl
I?€™ll never let you down
Won?€™t let you down

This is the beginning of your day
Life is more intricate than it seems
Always be yourself along the way
Living through the spirit of your dreams

Beautiful girl
Won?€™t you be my inspiration?
Beautiful girl
Don?€™t you throw your love around
What in the world, what in the world
Could ever come between us?
Beautiful girl, beautiful girl
I?€™ll never let you down
Won?€™t let you down
Down, down?€¦

Source: Cranberries-Fan.com

Posted in Dolores News |


We have all 3 video & mp3 recordings from Monaco 2006 on our site:

- Away in a Manger
(password: http://www.the-cranberries.ru/eng/video)
- Angel Fire
(password: http://www.the-cranberries.ru/eng/video)
- War Is Over
(password: http://www.the-cranberries.ru/eng/video)

Download 3 high-quality mp3 versions in Audio-Section.

And all these video-files and mp3-s are in PERFECT quality! (just like Vatican 2005, for example)

We have already reuploaded Angel Fire, Away in a Manger and War Is Over to our hosting.

Special thanks to Italian fan BadJoe for ripping this video. Dolores looks great at this concert, and sings like an angel! Specially her new Solo-song Angel Fire. We can realize that her new song is incredible! And we will really happy if the whole album will be so great.

This concert was broadcasted on Italian TV on December 24 and ripped by BadJoe.

Thank you, Dolores, for this great X-mas present to all cran-fans all over the World! You?€™re so perfect the way you are!

 

Source: BadJoe

Posted in Dolores News |


Adam Sandler, director Frank Coraci, and producer Tim Herlihy talk about Dolores, Cranberries and ?€?Linger?€?.

About the flashback scene where ?€?Linger?€? plays in a bar

Sandler: ?€?This is Herlihy?€™s favorite tune. He picked it. We all love it though. The Cranberries.?€?

Herlihy: ?€?It?€™s a great, great tune. A band from Ireland.?€?

Sandler: ?€?Great people. They came out here and sang the tune live at the wedding.?€?

Coraci: ?€?So when I filmed this, all the flashbacks tried to look the period. When I filmed this, I wanted it to look like late 80s, early 90s movie ?€“ a little bit overlit, movies like that, kind of crisp looking. The other [flashbacks] were 70s and all washed out and golden. But doesn?€™t this look a little bit like a movie from the 80s that you?€™d see on HBO? ?€¦We pushed it a little bit, the look, so that everybody looked more 80s than 90s. It?€™s really ?€™93 or something in the movie, but just to make it fun, we leaned a little back further on the way people dressed.?€?

About Dolores?€™s live performance

Sandler: ?€?Dolores came and sang for us, and she sings live. It sounds awesome. People were blown away every time she would sing.?€?

Coraci: ?€?At first we did pre-records, but then when she got loose, we said, would you mind singing live, so she sang live and that?€™s what?€™s in the movie. Her voice is just amazing.?€?

Sandler: ?€?She looks terrific.?€?

Coraci: ?€?That Irish thing works for her, eh? What a voice. So beautiful and sexy.?€?

 

Source: ZG

Posted in Dolores News |


New Dolores’ promo photos. Dolores looks really special, like a model!

Photo1
Photo2
Photo3
Photo4
Photo5
Photo6
Photo7

High quality variant of some previous promo photos:
Photo8
Photo9
Photo10

Posted in Dolores News |


Today was a premier of 2 new Dolores’ song “Human Spirit” & “When We Were Young” on Croatian radio! You can listen to these songs right now. Just click here.

Vote for these songs in our poll Here, plz!

Human Spirit

Don’t let life consume you
It could eat you up inside
Can you see the human spirit
Tell me why should I have to hide

And With my heart in my hand
And with my hand upon my heart
And with my heart in my hand
It’s not like we planned

Don’t betray your lover
You will just betray yourself
Can you see the human spirit
Is there emptiness inside

And With my heart in my hand
And with my hand upon my heart
And with my heart in my hand
It’s not like we planned

Can you see the human spirit
Is there emptiness inside
Can you see the human spirit
Is there lonelyness inside

When We Were Young

Doodoo doo doo

Funny how things just tasted better
When we were young
Funny how things just seem so easy
When we were young

It’s been a long day
It’s been a long day
It’s been a long day
It’s been a long day

I wanna get out
I wanna go home
Is anything better
That you wanted for?
I wanna get out
I wanna go home
Is anything better
That you wanted for?

Doodoo doo doo

I think that we weren’t always grateful
For what you’ve done
When we were young
I think that we weren’t always grateful
For what you’ve done

We’ve come a long way
We’ve come a long way
We’ve come a long way
We’ve come a long way

I wanna get out
I wanna go home
Is anything better
That you wanted for?
I wanna get out
I wanna go home
Is anything better
That you wanted for?

You wanted for
You wanted for
You wanted for

I wanna get out
I wanna go home
Is anything better
That you wanted for?
I wanna get out
I wanna go home
I wanna feel better
And make it alone

I wanna get out
I wanna go home
Is anything better
That you wanted for?

Ahhhhehhhohhahahahhhh

Source: ZGF

Posted in Dolores News |


Information about European tour:

29TH MAY - BARCELONA, SPAIN - RAZZMATAZZ
31ST MAY - MILAN, ITALY - ALCATRAZ
01ST JUNE - ZURICH, SWITZERLAND - KAUFLEUTEN
03RD JUNE - AMSTERDAM, HOLLAND - PARADISO
05TH JUNE - BRUSSELS, BELGIUM - ANCIENNE BELGIQUE
06TH JUNE - PARIS, FRANCE - BATACLAN
09TH JUNE - BERLIN, GERMANY - COLUMBIA CLUB
10TH JUNE - STOCKHOLM,SWEDEN - BERNS
11TH JUNE - COPENHAGEN, DENMARK - VEGA
13TH JUNE - COLOGNE, GERMANY - GLORIA
15TH JUNE - LONDON, U.K. - KOKO CLUB

Source: Official Site

Posted in Dolores News |


Personal Dolores’ company Helter Ltd. has bought domain www.doloresoriordan.ie. The site is not ready yet. But it’s so great that Dolores has bought ireland domain! BTW Don Burton is a manager of Helter Ltd. So maybe Dolores’ official site will be www.doloresoriordan.ie for years!

Posted in Dolores News |


French press release by Sanctuary Records includes the title of a song called “Watch the Stars”. We don’t know maybe it’s a B-side or song from Dolores’ album “Are you Listening”. But anyway we will get +1 Dolores’ song! Also French press release says that “Ordinary Day” is the fist single, and Dan Brodbeck and Dolores O?€™Riordan co-produced most of the album.

Source: Metal-Live.com

Posted in Dolores News |


Short, but important news! Dolores will perform in Paris, Bataclan, France on the 6 of June 2007. Maybe it’s the beginning of her summer tour or not. But it means that Dolores’ solo tour will be on summer!

When there will be another information about Dolores’ gigs and ways to buy tickets we will write about it for sure! Keep visiting our site for more news about Dolores.

Source: zegut.blogspot.com

Posted in Dolores News |


You have opportunity to see Dolores’ solo Cover before album release! Do you like it? Dolores looks like model!

We discuss theme about Dolores’ solo cover Here. To join us!

Dolores' solo Cover

Source: zegut.blogspot.com

Posted in Dolores News |


New Dolores o’Riordan’s song “ORDINARY DAY” sounds on Croatian radio! You can listen to this song on Official Site

Write your opinion about this song on our forum

DOLORES O’RIORDAN ORDINARY DAY

This is just an ordinary day
Wipe the insecurities away
I can see that the darkness will erode
Looking out the corner of my eye
I can see that the sunshine will explode
Far across the desert in the sky

Beautiful girl
Won’t you be my inspiration?
Beautiful girl
Don’t you throw your love around
What in the world, what in the world
Could ever come between us?
Beautiful girl, beautiful girl
I’ll never let you down
Won’t let you down

This is the beginning of your day
Life is more intricate than it seems
Always be yourself along the way
Living through the spirit of your dreams

Beautiful girl
Won’t you be my inspiration?
Beautiful girl
Don’t you throw your love around
What in the world, what in the world
Could ever come between us?
Beautiful girl, beautiful girl
I’ll never let you down
Won’t let you down
Down, down…

Source: Cranberries-Fan.com

Posted in Dolores News |


We have all 3 video & mp3 recordings from Monaco 2006 on our site:
- Away in a Manger
(password: http://www.the-cranberries.ru/eng/video)
- Angel Fire
(password: http://www.the-cranberries.ru/eng/video)
- War Is Over
(password: http://www.the-cranberries.ru/eng/video)

Download 3 high-quality mp3 versions in Audio-Section.

And all these video-files and mp3-s are in PERFECT quality! (just like Vatican 2005, for example)

We have already reuploaded Angel Fire, Away in a Manger and War Is Over to our hosting.

Special thanks to Italian fan BadJoe for ripping this video. Dolores looks great at this concert, and sings like an angel! Specially her new Solo-song Angel Fire. We can realize that her new song is incredible! And we will really happy if the whole album will be so great.

This concert was broadcasted on Italian TV on December 24 and ripped by BadJoe.

Thank you, Dolores, for this great X-mas present to all cran-fans all over the World! You’re so perfect the way you are!

 

Source: BadJoe

Posted in Dolores News |


Adam Sandler, director Frank Coraci, and producer Tim Herlihy talk about Dolores, Cranberries and “Linger”.

About the flashback scene where “Linger” plays in a bar

Sandler: “This is Herlihy’s favorite tune. He picked it. We all love it though. The Cranberries.”

Herlihy: “It’s a great, great tune. A band from Ireland.”

Sandler: “Great people. They came out here and sang the tune live at the wedding.”

Coraci: “So when I filmed this, all the flashbacks tried to look the period. When I filmed this, I wanted it to look like late 80s, early 90s movies a little bit overlit, movies like that, kind of crisp looking. The other [flashbacks] were 70s and all washed out and golden. But doesn’t this look a little bit like a movie from the 80s that you’d see on HBO. We pushed it a little bit, the look, so that everybody looked more 80s than 90s. It’s really ‘93 or something in the movie, but just to make it fun, we leaned a little back further on the way people dressed.”

About Dolores’s live performance

Sandler: “Dolores came and sang for us, and she sings live. It sounds awesome. People were blown away every time she would sing.”

Coraci: “At first we did pre-records, but then when she got loose, we said, would you mind singing live, so she sang live and that’s what’s in the movie. Her voice is just amazing.”

Sandler: “She looks terrific.”

Coraci: “That Irish thing works for her, eh? What a voice. So beautiful and sexy.”

 

Source: ZG

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores O’Riordan appeared three times during the Christmas concert on December 9. She sang the Christmas song “Away in a Manger”, her new song “Angel Fire” and participated in the performance of John Lennon’s “War is Over”.

We have the recordings of Away in a Manger and Angel Fire. Thanks to Italian fans Tipsy, Irishsoul, Free to Decide. Photo by Tipsy. The quality of these mp3s is not very good. But we can realize the beauty of Dolores’s singing. We can realize that her new song is incredible! And we will really happy if the whole album will be so great.

This concert will be broadcasted on Italian TV on December 24. After that we’ll get the video and audio in an excellent quality. We hope so.

And now we’d like to thank our beloved Dolores for her beautiful strong songs, for her significant voice. Thank you, Dolores! You are still with us! We wish you good luck, and more great songs!

 

Source: ZG, I Still Dream. The Italian forum

Posted in Dolores News |


“Are You Listening?” that is the title of so long-awaited Dolores’s album. Of course we are listening, we are hoping, we are waiting. Because we love you, Dolores. This is our answer to Dol’s question.

The album will release on May 7 2007 in Europe / May 8 in the United States. We congratulate everyone who cannot remain indifferent to Dolores singing!

The lead single will release in late April 2007.

Dolores will tour in support of the album in spring and summer.

In USA the album will be released by Sanctuary Records. In Europe it’ll be released by Sequel - Sanctuary’s sublabel. Sanctuary’s CEO Joe Cokell said that the Sequel label specializes “as a home for contemporary artists, particularly those who have already established a fan base and who are looking for an alternative to the major labels”.

 

Source: ZG, Sanctuary Records, Billboard

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores will perform at Grimaldi Forum in Monte Carlo, Monaco.

The Christmas concert took place in Vatican during the last 13 years. But this year Pope Benedict XVI cancelled it. And now it has moved to Monaco. The concert will be broadcasted on the national Italian TV channel RAI Due. Hopefully, we’ll get the record of Dolores’s performance.

Free to Decide - the Italian fan said that our beloved Dolores will sing HER NEW song - “Angel Fire” in addition to one or more traditional Christmas songs.

“Angel Fire” is a song from the forthcoming Dolores’s solo album “Are You Listening”. We don’t know whether it will be a single or not.

This is the forth time when Dolores appears at the Christmas concert. The first three took place in 2001, 2002, 2005.

 

Source: ZG, Concerto di Natale, I Still Dream. The Italian forum

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores O’Riordan and her husband Don Burton have won a lawsuit against a Limerick window company, the UK’s The Sun reports.

The Burtons hired Four Seasons Conservatories, a company run by brothers Brian and Anthony Fitzgerald to do work in the couple’s Killmallock home before it sold in 2004. However, the job was unsatisfactory and the Burtons ended up taking the matter to court.

Now the brothers must pay 46,582 Euro ($59,000 US) to the couple, which includes a hefty 35,155 Euro in legal fees.

Anthony Fitzgerald said, ‘We have gone through with appeals but that is too late now. This only started out as a small amount of money originally.’?

 

Source: The Sun (UK), ZG

Posted in Dolores News |


HER distinctive Limerick lilt might have made her a star, but planners claim Dolores O’Riordan hasn’t lingered long enough in her native county to qualify as a local.

The former lead singer with the Cranberries has hit a snag in her plans to build a lavish contemporary house and stables in Kilmallock, a rural town 40km from Limerick city. Citing local rules, residents claim that she has severed her ties with the area and should not be allowed to build a one-off home in their sleepy community.

Following a string of objections by residents of Kilmallock, planners from Limerick county council have asked O’Riordan to clarify that she has lived locally for at least 10 years and that she intends to use the proposed property as her primary home. They have also asked her to produce evidence that she is in the process of selling her current dwelling and to confirm that she hasn’t built a house before in Co Limerick.

O’Riordan, divides her time between a log cabin in Ontario, Canada, where her husband, Don Burton, comes from, and Howth, Co Dublin. She bought Riversfield Stud, a sprawling, 150-acre farm in Kilmallock in 1998. She remained in the property for six years before selling it and most of the surrounding land for ?†4.5m in 2004 saying she needed to move to Dublin for career reasons.

She currently lives in the Thormanby Woods development in Howth but recently applied for planning permission to construct a state-of-the-art hilltop pad on a 2.5-acre site on upmarket Ceanchor Road in Howth, where neighbours include Feargal Quinn. She paid ?†2m for the sea-front site in 2004 and plans to build a contemporary 4,500-sq-ft mansion with a pool, sauna, and gym.

Residents of Kilmallock, some of whom have been refused planning permission for one-off homes on their land, claim that the house on a two-acre site will be built ‘for financial gain’ and that O’Riordan’s visiting entourage will ruin their ‘quiet and beautiful road’. While living in Riversfield Stud, the pop star maintained a large security personnel.

Chris Hargreaves and Annette Hayes, who bought a 0.75-acre site from O’Riordan when she was selling her stud farm, said in their objection that the singer assured them that the two-acre site she is currently trying to develop would only be used as agricultural land.

‘This information had a huge influence on our decision to purchase our property as it afforded beautiful views and is a perfect complement to what is in its present state an extremely well-balanced and harmonious area of natural beauty.’

The couple are also sceptical of O’Riordan’s claims that she intends to use the property as her permanent base. ‘There was a previous application for three dwelling houses on the site which was rejected by Limerick county council,’ they said. ‘We therefore feel it is highly unlikely that the Burtons would intend to reside in the property, should planning be approved. This refutes their claim that the property is ?€?needed’ or required for personal use.’

Luke Lillington, the owner of Mount Coote stud nearby, said: ‘They [Burton and O’Riordan] moved to Dublin in 2004 mentioning that life was ?€?too quiet’ here. My belief is that the proposal is for further financial gain and not personal use.’

He also questioned the size of the adjoining stables. ‘I wonder where the horses will be kept outside of stabling as the area of land is very small relative to the area of stabling. There is also no mention of a manure pit. How will this affect the water supply?’

In a letter accompanying her planning application O’Riordan stated that she was ‘born and reared in Grange, Kilmallock, Co Limerick’ and that she has family in the area.

Gerry Sheeran, a senior planner with Limerick county council, said the latest county development plan sets out the criteria for building in an area with a strong agricultural base.

‘Applicants should be long-term residents, preferably resident before 1990 or should be involved in essential local activities, for example the local teacher or doctor,’ he said.

‘Someone can qualify on all counts but if they don’t need a house in the countryside, then we take a dim view.’

O’Riordan’s architect, Wesley Stanhope, would not comment on the couple’s plans for the Kilmallock site.

Source: The Sunday Times, ZG

Posted in Dolores News |


HER distinctive Limerick lilt might have made her a star, but planners claim Dolores O’Riordan hasn’t lingered long enough in her native county to qualify as a local.

The former lead singer with the Cranberries has hit a snag in her plans to build a lavish contemporary house and stables in Kilmallock, a rural town 40km from Limerick city. Citing local rules, residents claim that she has severed her ties with the area and should not be allowed to build a one-off home in their sleepy community.

Following a string of objections by residents of Kilmallock, planners from Limerick county council have asked O’Riordan to clarify that she has lived locally for at least 10 years and that she intends to use the proposed property as her primary home. They have also asked her to produce evidence that she is in the process of selling her current dwelling and to confirm that she hasn’t built a house before in Co Limerick.

O’Riordan, divides her time between a log cabin in Ontario, Canada, where her husband, Don Burton, comes from, and Howth, Co Dublin. She bought Riversfield Stud, a sprawling, 150-acre farm in Kilmallock in 1998. She remained in the property for six years before selling it and most of the surrounding land for ?†4.5m in 2004 saying she needed to move to Dublin for career reasons.

She currently lives in the Thormanby Woods development in Howth but recently applied for planning permission to construct a state-of-the-art hilltop pad on a 2.5-acre site on upmarket Ceanchor Road in Howth, where neighbours include Feargal Quinn. She paid ?†2m for the sea-front site in 2004 and plans to build a contemporary 4,500-sq-ft mansion with a pool, sauna, and gym.

Residents of Kilmallock, some of whom have been refused planning permission for one-off homes on their land, claim that the house on a two-acre site will be built ‘for financial gain’ and that O’Riordan’s visiting entourage will ruin their ‘quiet and beautiful road’. While living in Riversfield Stud, the pop star maintained a large security personnel.

Chris Hargreaves and Annette Hayes, who bought a 0.75-acre site from O’Riordan when she was selling her stud farm, said in their objection that the singer assured them that the two-acre site she is currently trying to develop would only be used as agricultural land.

‘This information had a huge influence on our decision to purchase our property as it afforded beautiful views and is a perfect complement to what is in its present state an extremely well-balanced and harmonious area of natural beauty.’

The couple are also sceptical of O’Riordan’s claims that she intends to use the property as her permanent base. ‘There was a previous application for three dwelling houses on the site which was rejected by Limerick county council,’ they said. ‘We therefore feel it is highly unlikely that the Burtons would intend to reside in the property, should planning be approved. This refutes their claim that the property is ?€?needed’ or required for personal use.’

Luke Lillington, the owner of Mount Coote stud nearby, said: ‘They [Burton and O’Riordan] moved to Dublin in 2004 mentioning that life was ?€?too quiet’ here. My belief is that the proposal is for further financial gain and not personal use.’

He also questioned the size of the adjoining stables. ‘I wonder where the horses will be kept outside of stabling as the area of land is very small relative to the area of stabling. There is also no mention of a manure pit. How will this affect the water supply?’

In a letter accompanying her planning application O’Riordan stated that she was ‘born and reared in Grange, Kilmallock, Co Limerick’ and that she has family in the area.

Gerry Sheeran, a senior planner with Limerick county council, said the latest county development plan sets out the criteria for building in an area with a strong agricultural base.

‘Applicants should be long-term residents, preferably resident before 1990 or should be involved in essential local activities, for example the local teacher or doctor,’ he said.

‘Someone can qualify on all counts but if they don’t need a house in the countryside, then we take a dim view.’

O’Riordan’s architect, Wesley Stanhope, would not comment on the couple’s plans for the Kilmallock site.

Source: The Sunday Times, ZG

Posted in Dolores News |


Music industry site A&R Worldwide (Yahoo! cache, snapshot) reports that Dolores O’Riordan is working with Tony Ciulla, former manager for Marilyn Manson, to manage her solo career.
Ciulla is a native of Cleveland, Ohio. He was the president of Nothing Records, owned by Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor, until he became Marilyn Manson’s (also a Cleveland native) manager in 1996. In 2000, Ciulla and Manson founded Posthuman Records together, but they parted ways in late 2005. He has also worked with Rammstein and The Rasmus, and his other current clients include The Lovemakers.
A&R Worldwide also reports that Dolores is looking for signing and licensing of her completed solo album in various territories around the world.

 

Source: A&R Worldwide, www.zombieguide.com

Posted in Dolores News |


Paddy writes in to say that a trailer for the movie recently shown on Australian TV predominantly features “Linger,” and the song has a role in the movie’s plot. You can watch that international trailer here.

Meanwhile, Jacqueline Lovell, a background actress who stood in for Dolores for some parts of the wedding scene, wrote up a report from the set, which was filmed sometime last fall:

 

Two days later I was out shopping when I got a rush call from Central Casting. They wanted me back down at the Sony Studios in two hours for Adam Sandler’s new movie ?€?Click?€? to replace a stand-in. I was told I would be standing in for Katie Cassidy, but as the night wore on and I still hadn’t been used after being there 8 hours I figured out why her original stand in had taken the night off. The five-page scene they were shooting was originally scheduled to be shot over three days and this was now day four and the call sheet said they wouldn’t finish it until day five. With shooting averaging a page a day and Katie being only in the last page of the scene, her original stand in must have been bored to tears. Along with the fact Adam prefers night shoots, the nights were getting longer and longer. I was finally used to stand in for Dolores O’Riordan of the Cranberries who was in the wedding reception scene singing her hit song ‘Linger’. The set was magical and standing in center stage, so to speak, was cool. When Dolores arrived to set she said ‘Hey sweetie’ to me as I stepped down and she took her place. We finally rapped up around 3:30am.

There’s no word yet on a soundtrack, but it’s very likely that “Linger” will be on it.

If anyone has more on Dolores’s participation in the movie, send it in! In the meantime, if you’d like to discuss this news (or drop some bad “wedding singer” puns), visit the The Cranberries’ forum.

 

Source: Krush the Serpent

Posted in Dolores News |


Dolores O’Riordan made her third appearance at the Vatican Christmas Concert in 2005. There were also performers Riccardo Cocciante, Gigi D’Alessio, Claudio Baglioni, Dolcenera, Alex Britti, Black Eyes Peas, Negramaro, Mango, Nicky Nicolai and Stefano Di Battista Quartet this year. This year’s concert took place on December 3, 2005 and was broadcast on Italian TV network Canale 5 and on radio network RTL 102.5 at 9:00 PM on December 24. Dolores last performed at the concerts for Pope John Paul II in 2001 and 2002 and was said to be one of his favorite singers. This will be Dolores’s first public performance in more than a year. This year’s concert is dubbed “Concert for East Asian Missions,” as funds from the concert will be used to build churches and fund missionaries in East Asia. Dolores performed Adeste Fideles (duet with Gianluca Terranova), Linger (she sang a really special version of this song!) and White Christmas (Dolores O’Riordan & others).

It was an AMAZING PERFORMANCE!
You can find Videos of Adeste Fideles and Linger in Video-Section and mp3 of all song-performances in Audio-Section

Source: Hot Press, Zombieguide.com

Posted in Dolores News |


Year: 2001
Translated by MB_Number5

Dolores O’Riordan is having solo plans. The singer of The Cranberries wants to experiment with folk music and release her own album. Would she be infected by Sinead O’Conner who’s having a lot of succes with her folk CD “Sean-Nos Nua”? In January Dolores will go into the studio. It’s not known yet which musicians will accompany her. She also has aspirations to be an actrice. She’s going to join a workshop.

The Cranberries have just ended an extensive Greatest-Hits tour and are back home right now to celebrate Christmas with their families. Meanwhile Dolores has travelled to Rome to perform two solo songs: the traditional Christmas carol “Adeste Fideles” (O Come All Ye Faithful), and the old Cranberry hit “Linger”.

Several media speculate about an end of the group. The band responded furious on their site: “We have received numerous e-mails regarding the band “breaking up”. Its just like 1994 / 1995 all over again! We would like to put an end to rumours that the band are splitting up, and / or are planning any solo albums. We realise there were some articles in various newspapers and magazines which cited Dolores as having said she was thinking about recording some solo work. The band have expressed their desire to change their approach to songwriting, and this could see them writing separately, initially. Dolores has performed solo before (e.g. “God Be With You”, “Pavorotti Charity Concert”) and no doubt she will in the future. She is going to start recording new material in January and the band hope to begin recording a new album by February. They are already in discussions with various producers”.

The Cranberries were established in 1990. De band scored at the beginning world hits like “Zombie”, “Linger” and “Dreams”.

Posted in Stuff, Articles |


Published: 05/05/96

 

May 10, 1996 — Ireland’s Cranberries may have found a cure for hyper-happiness and excessive good cheer. It’s an album, the band’s latest, called “To The Faithful Departed,” and, yes , much of it is about people of the deceased persuasion, and, yes, the song about John Lennon ends with gun-shot sound effects. Singer Delores O’Riordan shared the sorrow with us recently.

MTV: With a title like “To The Faithful Departed,” you expect the Cranberries to be dealing with the topic of death, and they do, but there are also songs about love and life and “Salvation,” the first single takes on all three in what some could see as a “just say no to drugs” anthem for the 90’s.

Dolores: It’s not so much like an anti-drug song. It’s kind of anti- the idea of becoming totally controlled by anything, any substance at all, because I know what’s it’s like. And it wasn’t a nice experience and it didn’t get me anywhere. It just confused me more.

MTV: So you tried some of these drugs that you were talking about in the song.

Dolores: Oh no, I didn’t try heroin. I was just trying to find the answer in getting out of it, whether it was drinking or whatever. I’m not going to elaborate. But it just, basically, any substances don’t really help. Reality is reality, and unfortunately, no how much you go away, you come back, and it’s always here.

MTV: Two of the albums’ tracks were debuted last year, during the Cranberries MTV “Unplugged” performance. One of them, called “I’m Still Remembering,” was written six months after Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain committed suicide.

Dolores: It was kind of sad how, you know, sometimes, when people die, you expect there to be a silence. But there wasn’t a silence. You know what RIP means. It means “rest in peace.” And I suppose it was kind of sad because nobody seemed to want to let it be. Everybody was just like, boom! It was just a big media thing, so it was kind of sad.

MTV: Other tracks on the album deal with such somber issues as the war in Bosnia, and the children who are victims of war — all of which seems to have affected Dolores, who we asked if she considered bringing children into such a world.

Dolores: I think it’s debatable. I love kids and I would love to but, it’s a pretty miserable old planet, all the same. Man! (laughs) But I imagine having kids and it’s like, there’s so much crap going on. Right now, I couldn’t deal with that pressure. So I’ll hold off for a few years.

Posted in Stuff, Interviews with Dolores |


• It’s time for amazing things! Our dear Lisa sings 3 songs in Dolores style, she imitates Dolores voice SO GREAT! You know, it sounds just like Dolores sang in 1990-1991 demo-records! It’s a really wonderfull performance! Listen to all 3 tracks and you will see that it’s beautiful and really sounds like Dolores’ singing!
- Lisa - Umbrella (time - 4:31)
- Lisa - Gomenasai (time - 3:43)
- Lisa - Umka (time - 3:13)

2 Dolores portraits are added to section Fan-Art. Big thanks to Ainaven ELF! These 2 portraits were given to Dolores by our Fan-Club when Dolores performed in Moscow on 10.11.2007! She was really glad and amazed!

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